45 Works

Data from: Above-ground and below-ground responses to long-term nutrient addition across a retrogressive chronosequence

David A. Wardle, Micael Jonsson, Jordan R. Mayor & Daniel B. Metcalfe
1. There is much interest in understanding ecosystem responses to local-scale soil fertility variation, which has often been studied using retrogressive chronosequences that span thousands of years and show declining fertility and plant productivity over time. There have been few attempts to experimentally test how plant nutrient limitation changes during retrogression. 2. We studied a well-characterized system of 30 forested lake islands in northern Sweden that collectively represent a 5350-year post-fire retrogressive chronosequence, with fertility...

Data from: Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species

Per Alström, Jon Fjeldså, Knud Andreas Jønsson, Anders Ödeen, Per G. P. Ericson, Martin Irestedt, J. Fjeldsa, K. A. Jonsson, P. Alstrom & A. Odeen
Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has...

Data from: Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest Mechanisms Involving Early B-Cell Development in Canine IgA Deficiency

Mia Olsson, Katarina Tengvall, Marcel Frankowiack, Marcin Kierczak, Kerstin Bergvall, Erik Axelsson, Linda Tintle, Eliane Marti, Petra Roosje, Tosso Leeb, Åke Hedhammar, Lennart Hammarström & Kerstin Lindblad-Toh
Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immune deficiency disorder in both humans and dogs, characterized by recurrent mucosal tract infections and a predisposition for allergic and other immune mediated diseases. In several dog breeds, low IgA levels have been observed at a high frequency and with a clinical resemblance to human IgAD. In this study, we used genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genomic regions associated with low IgA levels in dogs...

Data from: Consequences of a demographic bottleneck on genetic structure and variation in the Scandinavian brown bear

Georgios Xenikoudakis, Erik Ersmark, Lisette Waits, Jonas Kindberg, Jon E. Swenson & Love Dalén
The Scandinavian brown bear went through a major decline in population size approximately 100 years ago, due to intense hunting. After being protected, the population subsequently recovered and today numbers in the thousands. The genetic diversity in the contemporary population has been investigated in considerable detail, and it has been shown that the population consists of several subpopulations that display relatively high levels of genetic variation. However, previous studies have been unable to resolve the...

Data from: Stoichiometric imbalances between detritus and detritivores are related to shifts in ecosystem functioning

André Frainer, Jérémy Jabiol, Mark O. Gessner, Andreas Bruder, Eric Chauvet, Brendan McKie & Brendan G. McKie
How are resource consumption and growth rates of litter-consuming detritivores affected by imbalances between consumer and litter C:N:P ratios? To address this question, we offered leaf litter as food to three aquatic detritivore species, which represent a gradient of increasing body N:P ratios: a crustacean, a caddisfly and a stonefly. The detritivores were placed in microcosms and submerged in a natural stream. Four contrasting leaf species were offered, both singly and in two-species mixtures, to...

Data from: Effects of elevation and nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on plant defence compounds in subarctic tundra heath vegetation

Jonathan R. De Long, Maja K. Sundqvist, Michael J. Gundale, Reiner Giesler & David A. Wardle
1. Plant chemical and structural defence compounds are well known to impact upon herbivory of fresh leaves and influence decomposition rates after leaf senescence. A number of theories predict that alleviating nutrient limitation and reducing other environmental stressors will result in decreased production of plant chemical defences. 2. In this study, we measured plant defence properties [total polyphenols (TP), condensed tannins (CT) and lignin concentrations, and protein complexation capacity (PCC)] in both fresh and senesced...

Data from: Relative impacts of environmental variation and evolutionary history on the nestedness and modularity of tree-herbivore networks.

Kathryn M. Robinson, Céline Hauzy, Nicolas Loeuille & Benedicte R. Albrectsen
Nestedness and modularity are measures of ecological networks whose causative effects are little understood. We analyzed antagonistic plant–herbivore bipartite networks using common gardens in two contrasting environments comprised of aspen trees with differing evolutionary histories of defence against herbivores. These networks were tightly connected owing to a high level of specialization of arthropod herbivores that spend a large proportion of the life cycle on aspen. The gardens were separated by ten degrees of latitude with...

Data from: Local and landscape-level floral resources explain effects of wildflower strips on wild bees across four European countries

Jeroen Scheper, Riccardo Bommarco, Andrea Holzschuh, Simon G. Potts, Verena Riedinger, Stuart P. M. Roberts, , Henrik G. Smith, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, Jennifer B. Wickens, Victoria J. Wickens & David Kleijn
1. Growing evidence for declines in wild bees calls for the development and implementation of effective mitigation measures. Enhancing floral resources is a widely accepted measure for promoting bees in agricultural landscapes, but effectiveness varies considerably between landscapes and regions. We hypothesize that this variation is mainly driven by a combination of the direct effects of measures on local floral resources and the availability of floral resources in the surrounding landscape. 2. To test this,...

Data from: Indirect effects of habitat disturbance on invasion: nutritious litter from a grazing resistant plant favors alien over native Collembola

Hans Petter Leinaas, Jan Bengtsson, Charlene Janion-Scheepers & Steven L. Chown
Biological invasions are major threats to biodiversity, with impacts that may be compounded by other forms of environmental change. Observations of high density of the invasive springtail (Collembola), Hypogastrura manubrialis in heavily grazed renosterveld vegetation in the Western Cape, South Africa, raised the question of whether the invasion was favored by changes in plant litter quality associated with habitat disturbance in this vegetation type. To examine the likely mechanisms underlying the high abundance of H....

Data from: Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists

Annegret Kohler, Alan Kuo, Laszlo G. Nagy, Emmanuelle Morin, Kerrie W. Barry, Francois Buscot, Bjorn Canback, Cindy Choi, Nicolas Cichocki, Alicia Clum, Jan Colpaert, Alex Copeland, Mauricio D. Costa, Jeanne Dore, Dimitrios Floudas, Gilles Gay, Mariangela Girlanda, Bernard Henrissat, Sylvie Herrmann, Jaqueline Hess, Nils Hogberg, Tomas Johansson, Hassine-Radhouane Khouja, Kurt LaButti, Urs Lahrmann … & Francis Martin
To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall–degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose....

Data from: Female Salix viminalis are more severely infected by Melampsora spp. but neither sex experiences associational effects

Kim K. Moritz, Christer Björkman, Amy L. Parachnowitsch & Johan A. Stenberg
Associational effects of plant genotype or species on plant biotic interactions are common, not least for disease spread, but associational effects of plant sex on interactions have largely been ignored. Sex in dioecious plants can affect biotic interactions with herbivores and pollinators; however, its effects on plant–pathogen interactions are understudied and associational effects are unknown. In a replicated field experiment, we assessed Melampsora spp. leaf rust infection in monosexual and mixed sex plots of dioecious...

Data from: Phantoms of the forest: legacy risk effects of a regionally extinct large carnivore

Ellinor Sahlén, Sonja Noell, Christopher S. DePerno, Jonas Kindberg, Göran Spong, Joris P. G. M. Cromsigt & Joris P.G.M. Cromsigt
The increased abundance of large carnivores in Europe is a conservation success, but the impact on the behavior and population dynamics of prey species is generally unknown. In Europe, the recolonization of large carnivores often occurs in areas where humans have greatly modified the landscape through forestry or agriculture. Currently, we poorly understand the effects of recolonizing large carnivores on extant prey species in anthropogenic landscapes. Here, we investigated if ungulate prey species showed innate...

Data from: Genome-wide association mapping in a wild avian population identifies a link between genetic and phenotypic variation in a life-history trait

Arild Husby, Takeshi Kawakami, Lars Rönnegård, Linnéa Smeds, Hans Ellegren, Anna Qvarnström, L. Ronnegard & A. Qvarnstrom
Understanding the genetic basis of traits involved in adaptation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology but remains poorly understood. Here, we use genome-wide association mapping using a custom 50 k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in a natural population of collared flycatchers to examine the genetic basis of clutch size, an important life-history trait in many animal species. We found evidence for an association on chromosome 18 where one SNP significant at the genome-wide...

Data from: Delayed timing of breeding as a cost of reproduction

Matthew Low, Debora Arlt, Tomas Pärt & Meit Öberg
Timing of breeding is a trait with considerable individual variation, often closely linked to fitness because of seasonal declines in reproduction. The drivers of this variation have received much attention, but how reproductive costs may influence the timing of subsequent breeding has been largely unexplored. We examined a population of northern wheatears Oenanthe oenanthe to compare three groups of individuals that differed in their timing of breeding termination and reproductive effort to investigate how these...

Data from: Environmental factors and traits that drive plant litter decomposition do not determine home-field advantage effects

Ciska G. F. Veen, Maja K. Sundqvist, David A. Wardle & G. F. Ciska Veen
The ‘home-field advantage’ (HFA) hypothesis predicts that plant litter is decomposed faster than expected underneath the plant from which it originates (‘home’) than underneath other plants (‘away’), because decomposer communities are specialized to break down litter from the plants they associate with. However, empirical evidence shows that the occurrence of HFA is highly variable, and the reasons for this are little understood. In our study we progress our understanding by investigating whether HFA is stronger...

Data from: Response of moose hunters to predation following wolf return in Sweden

Camilla Wikenros, Håkan Sand, Roger Bergström, Olof Liberg & Guillaume Chapron
Background: Predation and hunter harvest constitute the main mortality factors affecting the size and dynamics of many exploited populations. The re-colonization by wolves (Canis lupus) of the Scandinavian Peninsula may therefore substantially reduce hunter harvest of moose (Alces alces), the main prey of wolves. Methodology/Principal findings: We examined possible effects of wolf presence on hunter harvest in areas where we had data before and after wolf establishment (n = 25), and in additional areas that...

Data from: Migrating songbirds on stopover prepare for, and recover from, oxidative challenges posed by long-distance flight

Megan M. Skrip, Ulf Bauchinger, Wolfgang Goymann, Leonida Fusani, Massimiliano Cardinale, Rebecca R. Alan & Scott R. McWilliams
Managing oxidative stress is an important physiological function for all aerobic organisms, particularly during periods of prolonged high metabolic activity, such as long-distance migration across ecological barriers. However, no previous study has investigated the oxidative status of birds at different stages of migration and whether that oxidative status depends on the condition of the birds. In this study, we compared (1) energy stores and circulating oxidative status measures in (a) two species of Neotropical migrants...

Data from: Water use by Swedish boreal forests in a changing climate

Thomas B. Hasper, Göran Wallin, Shubhangi Lamba, Marianne Hall, Fernando Jaramillo, Hjalmar Laudon, Sune Linder, Jane L. Medhurst, Mats Räntfors, Bjarni D. Sigurdsson & Johan Uddling
The rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) and temperature have the potential to substantially affect the terrestrial water and energy balance by altering the stomatal conductance and transpiration of trees. Many models assume decreases in stomatal conductance and plant water use under rising [CO2], which has been used as a plausible explanation for the positive global trend in river run-off over the past century. Plant water use is, however, also affected by changes...

Data from: A multi-breed genome-wide association analysis for canine hypothyroidism identifies a shared major risk locus on CFA12

Matteo Bianchi, Stina Dahlgren, Jonathan Massey, Elisabeth Dietschi, Marcin Kierczak, Martine Lund-Ziener, Katarina Sundberg, Stein Istre Thoresen, Olle Kämpe, Göran Andersson, William E. R. Ollier, Åke Hedhammar, Tosso Leeb, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, Lorna J. Kennedy, Frode Lingaas & Gerli Rosengren Pielberg
Bianchi, Dahlgren et al., Canine Hypothyroidism data

Data from: Spatial soil heterogeneity has a greater effect on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and plant growth than genetic modification with Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes

Tanya E. Cheeke, Ursel M. Schütte, Chris M. Hemmerich, Mitchell B. Cruzan, Todd N. Rosenstiel & James D. Bever
Maize, genetically modified with the insect toxin genes of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), is widely cultivated, yet its impacts on soil organisms are poorly understood. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbiotic associations with plant roots and may be uniquely sensitive to genetic changes within a plant host. In this field study, the effects of nine different lines of Bt maize and their corresponding non-Bt parental isolines were evaluated on AMF colonization and community diversity in plant...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    45

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    45

Affiliations

  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    45
  • Lund University
    6
  • University of Copenhagen
    6
  • University of Helsinki
    6
  • Uppsala University
    6
  • Umeå University
    6
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Stockholm University
    3
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    3
  • Finnish Environment Institute
    2