56 Works

Saiga antelope die-off and calving sites in Kazakhstan

S. J. Robinson, N. Singh & S. Zuther
This dataset records the Saiga antelope die-off and calving sites in Kazakhstan. It represents the locations (and where available dates) of (i) die-offs and (ii) normal calving events in the Betpak-dala population of the saiga antelope, in which three major mass mortality events have been recorded since 1988. In total, the data contains 214 saiga die-off and calving sites obtained from field visits, aerial surveys, telemetry and literature. Locations derived from field data, aerial surveys...

Data from: Integrating genetic analysis of mixed populations with a spatially-explicit population dynamics model

Rebecca Whitlock, Samu Mäntyniemi, Stefan Palm, Marja-Liisa Koljenen, Johan Dannewitz, Johan Östergren & Marja-Liisa Koljonen
Inferring the dynamics of populations in time and space is a central challenge in ecology. Intra-specific structure (for example genetically distinct sub-populations or meta-populations) may require methods that can jointly infer the dynamics of multiple populations. This is of particular importance for harvested species, for which management must balance utilization of productive populations with protection of weak ones. Here we present a novel method for simultaneous learning about the spatio-temporal dynamics of multiple populations that...

Data from: Plant-pollinator networks in semi-natural grasslands are resistant to the loss of pollinators during blooming of mass-flowering crops

Ainhoa Magrach, Anna Holzschuh, Ignasi Bartomeus, Verena Riedinger, Stuart P.M. Roberts, , Ante Vujic, Jennifer B. Wickens, Victoria J. Wickens, Riccardo Bommarco, Juan P. Gonzalez-Varo, Simon G. Potts, Henrik G. Smith, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, Montserrat Vilà, Andrea Holzschuh & Stuart P. M. Roberts
Mass-flowering crops lead to spatial redistributions of pollinators and to transient shortages within nearby semi-natural grasslands, but the impacts on plant-pollinator interactions remain largely unexplored. Here, we characterised which pollinator species are attracted by oilseed rape and how this affected the structure of plant-pollinator networks in nearby grasslands. We surveyed 177 networks from three countries (Germany, Sweden and United Kingdom) in 24 landscapes with high crop cover, and compared them to 24 landscapes with low...

Data from: Informative plot sizes in presence-absence sampling of forest floor vegetation

Göran Ståhl, Magnus Ekström, Jonas Dahlgren, Per-Anders Esseen, Anton Grafström & Bengt-Gunnar Jonsson
1. Plant communities are attracting increased interest in connection with forest and landscape inventories due to society’s interest in ecosystem services. However, the acquisition of accurate information about plant communities poses several methodological challenges. Here we investigate the use of presence-absence sampling with the aim to monitor state and change of plant density. We study what plot sizes are informative, i.e. the estimators should have as high precision as possible. 2. Plant occurrences were modeled...

Data from: Functional traits associated with the establishment of introduced Phytophthora spp. in Swedish forests

Miguel A. Redondo, Johanna Boberg, Jan Stenlid & Jonàs Oliva
1. Invasive forest pathogens of the genus Phytophthora are threatening ecosystems globally. Phytophthora species are mainly introduced by humans importing infected nursery stock. However, due to the presence of environmental filters, not all introduced Phytophthoras manage to establish and spread. Some Phytophthoras’ ability to overcome these filters may be linked to functional traits. In Northern Europe, the increasing number of reports calls for a better understanding of the invasion process to prevent future outbreaks. 2....

Data from: A context-dependent induction of natal habitat preference in a generalist herbivorous insect

Patrick Lhomme, David Carrasco, Mattias Larsson, Bill Hansson & Peter Anderson
In many species adults exploit sensory information experienced in their natal habitat when searching for resources. This behavioral plasticity may help animals to establish themselves in new habitats by quickly locating suitable resources and avoiding unsuitable resources in complex environments. However the processes guiding positive or negative natal habitat preference induction (NHPI) remain poorly understood. In the polyphagous moth Spodoptera littoralis, earlier studies have shown that female innate host-plant preference is modulated by larval feeding...

Data from: Active farmsteads are year-round strongholds for farmland birds

Martin Šálek, Miroslav Bažant & Michał Żmihorski
1. Farmland birds have experienced substantial declines over recent decades and various conservation measures have been designed to halt their massive decrease. The effectiveness of these measures is however limited, due to inappropriate identification of crucial breeding and wintering habitats. Identification of appropriate habitats, like farmsteads, and understanding seasonal changes in species richness and abundance of farmland birds within these habitats may therefore be key for farmland bird conservation. 2. We investigated the effect of...

Data from: Soil fertility shapes belowground food webs across a regional climate gradient

Etienne Laliberté, Paul Kardol, Raphael K. Didham, François P. Teste, Benjamin L. Turner & David A. Wardle
Changes in soil fertility during pedogenesis affect the quantity and quality of resources entering the belowground subsystem. Climate governs pedogenesis, yet how climate modulates responses of soil food webs to soil ageing remains unexplored because of the paucity of appropriate model systems. We characterised soil food webs along each of four retrogressive soil chronosequences situated across a strong regional climate gradient to show that belowground communities are predominantly shaped by changes in fertility rather than...

Data from: Stable isotopes reveal the effect of trawl fisheries on the diet of commercially exploited species

Hilmar Hinz, Joan Moranta, Stephen Balestrini, Marija Sciberras, Julia R. Pantin, James Monnington, Alex Zalewski, Michel J. Kaiser, Mattias Sköld, Patrik Jonsson, Francois Bastardie & Jan Geert Hiddink
Bottom trawling can change food availability for benthivorous demersal species by (i) changing benthic prey composition through physical seabed impacts and (ii) by removing overall benthic consumer biomass increasing the net availability of benthic prey for remaining individuals. Thus trawling may both negatively and positively influence the quantity and quality of food available. Using δ13C and δ15N we investigated potential diet changes of three commercially exploited species across trawling gradients in the Kattegat (plaice, dab...

Data from: A Drosophila female pheromone elicits species-specific long-range attraction via an olfactory channel with dual specificity for sex and food

Sebastien Lebreton, Felipe Borrero-Echeverry, Francisco Gonzalez, Marit Solum, Erika A. Wallin, Erik Hedenström, Bill S. Hansson, Anna-Lena Gustavsson, Marie Bengtsson, Göran Birgersson, , Hany K. M. Dweck, Paul G. Becher & Peter Witzgall
Background: Mate finding and recognition in animals evolves during niche adaptation and involves social signals and habitat cues. Drosophila melanogaster and related species are known to be attracted to fermenting fruit for feeding and egg-laying, which poses the question of whether species-specific fly odours contribute to long-range premating communication. Results: We have discovered an olfactory channel in D. melanogaster with a dual affinity to sex and food odorants. Female flies release a pheromone, (Z)-4-undecenal (Z4-11Al),...

Data from: Direct and pollinator-mediated effects of herbivory on strawberry and the potential for improved resistance

Anne Muola, Daniela Weber, Lisa E. Malm, Paul A. Egan, Robert Glinwood, Amy L. Parachnowitsch & Johan A. Stenberg
The global decline in pollinators has partly been blamed on pesticides, leading some to propose pesticide-free farming as an option to improve pollination. However, herbivores are likely to be more prevalent in pesticide-free environments, requiring knowledge of their effects on pollinators, and alternative crop protection strategies to mitigate any potential pollination reduction. Strawberry leaf beetles (SLB) Galerucella spp. are important strawberry pests in Northern Europe and Russia. Given that SLB attack both leaf and flower...

Data from: Forest restoration as a double-edged sword: the conflict between biodiversity conservation and pest control

Simon Kärvemo, Christer Björkman, Therese Johansson, Jan Weslien & Joakim Hjältén
1. Forestry has markedly changed a large proportion of the world’s boreal forests, often with negative effects on biodiversity. As a result, forest restoration is increasingly implemented to counteract the negative effects. However, restoration measures aimed at mimicking natural disturbance regimes could simultaneously increase the risk of unwanted negative effects, such as damage by forest pest species. This study compares the effect of two restoration methods (prescribed burning and gap-cutting), on both biodiversity conservation and...

Data from: The role of bryophytes for tree seedling responses to winter climate change: implications for the stress gradient hypothesis

Signe Lett, David A. Wardle, Marie-Charlotte Nilsson, Laurenz M. Teuber & Ellen Dorrepaal
1.When tree seedlings establish beyond the current tree line due to climate warming, they encounter existing vegetation, such as bryophytes that often dominate in arctic and alpine tundra. The stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) predicts that plant interactions in tundra become increasingly negative as climate warms and conditions become less harsh. However, for seedlings climate warming might not result in lower winter stress, if insulating snow cover is reduced. 2.We aimed to understand to if bryophytes...

Data from: Temperature-dependent body size effects determine population responses to climate warming

Max Lindmark, Magnus Huss, Jan Ohlberger & Anna Gårdmark
Current understanding of animal population responses to rising temperatures is based on the assumption that biological rates such as metabolism, which governs fundamental ecological processes, scale independently with body size and temperature, despite empirical evidence for interactive effects. Here we investigate the consequences of interactive temperature- and size-scaling of vital rates for the dynamics of populations experiencing warming using a stage-structured consumer-resource model. We show that interactive scaling alters population and stage-specific responses to rising...

Data from: Coordinated responses of soil communities to elevation in three subarctic vegetation types

G. F. Ciska Veen, Jonathan R. De Long, Paul Kardol, Maja K. Sundqvist, L. Basten Snoek & David A. Wardle
Global warming has begun to have a major impact on the species composition and functioning of plant and soil communities. However, long-term community and ecosystem responses to increased temperature are still poorly understood. In this study, we used a well-established elevational gradient in northern Sweden to elucidate how plant, microbial and nematode communities shift with elevation and associated changes in temperature in three highly contrasting vegetation types (i.e. heath, meadow and Salix vegetation). We found...

Data from: The best of both worlds: a combined approach for analyzing microalgal diversity via metabarcoding and morphology-based methods

Sophie Groendahl, Maria Kahlert & Patrick Fink
An increasing number of studies use next generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze complex communities, but is the method sensitive enough when it comes to identification and quantification of species? We compared NGS with morphology-based identification methods in an analysis of microalgal (periphyton) communities. We conducted a mesocosm experiment in which we allowed two benthic grazer species to feed upon benthic biofilms, which resulted in altered periphyton communities. Morphology-based identification and 454 (Roche) pyrosequencing of the...

Data from: A test of the hierarchical model of litter decomposition

Mark A. Bradford, G. F. Veen, Anne Bonis, Ella M. Bradford, Aimee T. Classen, J. Hans C. Cornelissen, Thomas W. Crowther, Jonathan R. De Long, Gregoire T. Freschet, Paul Kardol, Marta Manrubia-Freixa, Daniel S. Maynard, Gregory S. Newman, Richard S. P. Van Logtestijn, Maria Viketoft, David A. Wardle, William R. Wieder, Stephen A. Wood & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Our basic understanding of plant litter decomposition informs the assumptions underlying widely applied soil biogeochemical models, including those embedded in Earth system models. Confidence in projected carbon cycle-climate feedbacks therefore depends on accurate knowledge about the controls regulating the rate at which plant biomass is decomposed into products such as CO2. Here, we test underlying assumptions of the dominant conceptual model of litter decomposition. The model posits that a primary control on the rate of...

Data from: A cross-scale trophic cascade from large predatory fish to algae in coastal ecosystems

Serena Donadi, Åsa N. Austin, Ulf Bergström, B. Klemens Eriksson, Joakim P. Hansen, Philip Jacobson, Göran Sundblad, Marin Van Regteren & Johan S. Eklöf
Trophic cascades occur in many ecosystems, but the factors regulating them are still elusive. We suggest that an overlooked factor is that trophic interactions (TIs) are often scale-dependent and possibly interact across spatial scales. To explore the role of spatial scale for trophic cascades, and particularly the occurrence of cross-scale interactions (CSIs), we collected and analysed food-web data from 139 stations across 32 bays in the Baltic Sea. We found evidence of a four-level trophic...

Data from: Trade-offs in the multi-use potential of managed boreal forests

Joachim Strengbom, E. Petter Axelsson, Tomas Lundmark & Annika Nordin
1. Implementing multi-use forest management to account for both commercial and non-commercial ecosystem services is gaining increased global recognition. Despite its spatial extent, and great economic and ecological values, few studies have evaluated the boreal forest and its management to assess the potential for simultaneous delivery of a suite of ecosystem services. 2. Using data from a Swedish long-term experiment this study explores how biodiversity of the ground vegetation and potential delivery of multiple ecosystem...

Data from: Experience buffers extrinsic mortality in a group-living bird species

Michael Griesser, Emeline Mourocq, Jonathan Barnaby, Katharine Bowegen, Sönke Eggers, Kevin Fletcher, Radoslav Kozma, Franziska Kurz, Anssi Laurila, Magdalena Nystrand, Enrico Sorato, Jan Ekman & Katharine M. Bowgen
Extrinsic mortality has a strong impact on the evolution of life-histories, prey morphology and behavioural adaptations, but for many animals the causes of mortality are poorly understood. Predation is an important driver of extrinsic mortality and mobile animals form groups in response to increased predation risk. Furthermore, in many species juveniles suffer higher mortality than older individuals, which may reflect a lower phenotypic quality, lower competitiveness, or a lack of antipredator or foraging skills. Here...

Data from: Berry production drives bottom-up effects on body mass and reproductive success in an omnivore

Anne G. Hertel, Richard Bischof, Ola Langvall, Atle Mysterud, Jonas Kindberg, Jon E. Swenson, Andreas Zedrosser & Ola Langval
Obligate herbivores dominate studies of the effects of climate change on mammals, however there is limited empirical evidence for how changes in the abundance or quality of plant food affect mammalian omnivores. Omnivores can exploit a range of different food resources over the course of a year, but they often rely on seasonally restricted highly nutritious fruiting bodies during critical life stages. Brown bears Ursus arctos in Sweden are dependent on berries for fattening before...

Data from: How bird clades diversify in response to climatic and geographic factors

Genoveva Rodriguez-Castaneda, Anouschka R. Hof & Roland Jansson
While the environmental correlates of global patterns in standing species richness are well understood, it is poorly known which environmental factors promote diversification (speciation minus extinction) in clades. We tested several hypotheses for how geographic and climatic variables should affect diversification using a large dataset of bird sister genera endemic to the New World. We found support for the area, evolutionary speed, environmental predictability and climatic stability hypotheses, but productivity and topographic complexity were rejected...

Data from: Spatio-temporal dynamics of a fish predator: density-dependent and hydrographic effects on Baltic Sea cod population

Valerio Bartolino, Huidong Tian, Ulf Bergström, Pekka Jounela, Eero Aro, Christian Dieterich, H.E. Markus Meier, Massimiliano Cardinale, Barbara Bland, Michele Casini & H. E. Markus Meier
Understanding the mechanisms of spatial population dynamics is crucial for the successful management of exploited species and ecosystems. However, the underlying mechanisms of spatial distribution are generally complex due to the concurrent forcing of both density-dependent species interactions and density-independent environmental factors. Despite the high economic value and central ecological importance of cod in the Baltic Sea, the drivers of its spatio-temporal population dynamics have not been analytically investigated so far. In this paper, we...

Data from: Distribution and functionality of copy number variation across European cattle populations

Maulik Upadhyay, Vinicius H. Da Silva, Hendrik-Jan Megens, Marleen H. P. W. Visker, Paolo Ajmone-Marsan, Valentin A. Bâlteanu, Susana Dunner, Jose Fernando Garcia, Catarina Ginja, Juha Kantanen, Martien A.M. Groenen, Richard P.M.A. Crooijmans, Vinicus H. Da Silva, Martien A. M. Groenen & Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans
Copy number variation (CNV), which is characterized by large-scale losses or gains of DNA fragments, contributes significantly to genetic and phenotypic variation. Assessing CNV across different European cattle populations might reveal genetic changes responsible for phenotypic differences, which have accumulated throughout the domestication history of cattle as consequences of evolutionary forces that act upon them. To explore pattern of CNVs across European cattle, we genotyped 149 individuals, that represent different European regions, using the Illumina...

Data from: Sociodemographic factors modulate the spatial response of brown bears to vacancies created by hunting

Shane C. Frank, Martin Leclerc, Fanie Pelletier, Frank Rosell, Jon E. Swenson, Richard Bischof, Jonas Kindberg, Hans Geir Eiken, Snorre B. Hagen, Andreas Zedrosser & Jon. E. Swenson
1.There is a growing recognition of the importance of indirect effects from hunting on wildlife populations, e.g., social and behavioral changes due to harvest, which occur after the initial offtake. Nonetheless, little is known about how the removal of members of a population influences the spatial configuration of the survivors. 2.We studied how surviving brown bears (Ursus arctos) used former home ranges that had belonged to casualties of the annual bear hunting season in southcentral...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56

Affiliations

  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    55
  • Wageningen University & Research
    6
  • University of Helsinki
    5
  • Lund University
    4
  • Uppsala University
    4
  • Nanyang Technological University
    3
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    3
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    3
  • Umeå University
    3
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    2