56 Works

Data from: Stream microbial communities and ecosystem functioning show complex responses to multiple stressors in wastewater

Francis J. Burdon, Yaohui Bai, Marta Reyes, Manu Tamminen, Phillip Staudacher, Simon Mangold, Heinz Singer, Katja Räsänen, Adriano Joss, Scott D. Tiegs, Jukka Jokela, Rik I. L. Eggen & Christian Stamm
Multiple anthropogenic drivers are changing ecosystems globally, with a disproportionate and intensifying impact on freshwater habitats. A major impact of urbanisation are inputs from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Initially designed to greatly reduce nutrient loads, WWTPs increasingly release a multitude of micropollutants (i.e., synthetic chemicals) and organisms (including antibiotic resistant bacteria) to receiving environments. This pollution may have pervasive impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services. Viewed through multiple lenses of macroecological and ecotoxicological theory, we...

Niche differentiation and evolution of the wood decay machinery in the invasive fungus Serpula lacrymans

Jaqueline Hess, Sudhagar V. Balasundaram, Renee I Bakkemo, Elodie Drula, Bernard Henrissat, Nils Högberg, Daniel Eastwood & Inger Skrede
Ecological niche breadth and the mechanisms facilitating its evolution are fundamental to understanding adaptation to changing environments, persistence of generalist and specialist lineages and the formation of new species. Woody substrates are structurally complex resources utilized by organisms with specialized decay machinery. Wood-decaying fungi represent ideal model systems to study evolution of niche breadth, as they vary greatly in their host range and preferred decay stage of the substrate. In order to dissect the genetic...

Close relatives in population samples: Evaluation of the consequences for genetic stock identification

Johan Östergren, Stefan Palm, John Gilbey & Johan Dannewitz
Determining the origin of individuals in mixed population samples is key in many ecological, conservation and management contexts. Genetic data can be analyzed using Genetic Stock Identification (GSI), where the origin of single individuals is determined using Individual Assignment (IA) and population proportions are estimated with Mixed Stock Analysis (MSA). In such analyses, allele frequencies in a reference baseline are required. Unknown individuals or mixture proportions are assigned to source populations based on the likelihood...

Robustness of a meta‐network to alternative habitat loss scenarios

Micaela Santos, Luciano Cagnolo, Tomas Roslin, Emmanuel F. Ruperto, María Laura Bernaschini & Diego P. Vázquez
Studying how habitat loss affects the tolerance of ecological networks to species extinction (i.e. their robustness) is key for our understanding of the influence of human activities on natural ecosystems. With networks typically occurring as local interaction networks interconnected in space (a meta-network), we may ask how the loss of specific habitat fragments affects the overall robustness of the meta-network. To address this question, for an empirical meta-network of plants, herbivores and natural enemies we...

Accounting for environmental variation in co‐occurrence modelling reveals the importance of positive interactions in root‐associated fungal communities

Nerea Abrego, Tomas Roslin, Tea Huotari, Ayco J.M. Tack, Björn D. Lindahl, Gleb Tikhonov, Panu Somervuo, Niels Martin Schmidt, Otso Ovaskainen & Ayco J. M. Tack
Understanding the role of interspecific interactions in shaping ecological communities is one of the central goals in community ecology. In fungal communities, measuring interspecific interactions directly is challenging because these communities are composed of large numbers of species, many of which are unculturable. An indirect way of assessing the role of interspecific interactions in determining community structure is to identify the species co-occurrences that are not constrained by the environmental conditions. In this study, we...

Moose (Alces alces) parturition dates, Sweden

Wiebke Neumann, Navinder J. Singh, Fredrik Stenbacka, Jonas Malmsten, Kjell Wallin, John P. Ball & Göran Ericsson
In northern environments, the period of access to high-quality forage is limited, exerting strong selective pressure to optimize the timing of parturition. We analysed timing and variation in moose parturition dates of 555 females at 18 study sites across 12ᵒ of latitude (56-68ᵒ N, 1,350 km) in Sweden. We found evidence for a spatial match of parturition timing to vegetation onset, but no evidence that moose adjust parturition to vegetation onset in a given year....

Agricultural intensification reduces plant taxonomic and functional diversity across European arable systems.

Carlos P Carmona, Irene Guerrero, Begoña Peco, Manuel B. Morales, Juan J Onate, Tomas Pärt, Teja Tscharntke, Jaan Liira, Tsipe Aavik, Mark Emmerson, Frank Berendse, Piotr Ceryngier, Vincent Bretagnolle, Wolfgang Weisser & Jan Bengtsson
1. Agricultural intensification is one of the main drivers of species loss worldwide, but there is still a lack of information about its effect on functional diversity of arable weeds communities. 2. Using a large scale pan European study including 786 fields within 261 farms from eight countries, we analysed differences in the taxonomic and functional diversity of arable weeds assemblages across different levels of agricultural intensification in. We estimated weed species frequency in each...

Data from: Evolution and disappearance of sympatric Coregonus albula in a changing environment - a case study of the only remaining population pair in Sweden

Stefan Palm
During the past 50 years Fennoscandian populations of spring-spawning Baltic cisco (Coregonus albula), sympatric to common autumn-spawners, have declined or disappeared; e.g., three out of four known spring-spawning populations in Sweden are regarded as extinct. Over the same period, climate has changed and populations have been subject to other anthropogenic stressors. We compared historic (1960s) and recent (1990-2000s) morphological data from the still existent sympatric cisco populations in Lake Fegen, Sweden. Phenotypic changes were found...

Globally, plant-soil feedbacks are weak predictors of plant abundance

Kurt Reinhart, Jonathan Bauer, Sarah McCarthy-Neumann, Andrew MacDougall, José Hierro, Mariana Chiuffo, Scott Mangan, Johannes Heinze, Joana Bergmann, Jasmin Joshi, Richard Duncan, Jeff Diaz, Paul Kardol, Gemma Rutten, Markus Fischer, Wim Van Der Putten, T. Bezemer & John Klironomos
Plant-soil feedbacks (PSFs) have been shown to strongly affect plant performance under controlled conditions, and PSFs are thought to have far reaching consequences for plant population dynamics and the structuring of plant communities. However, thus far the relationship between PSF and plant species abundance in the field is not consistent. Here, we synthesize PSF experiments from tropical forests to semiarid grasslands, and test for a positive relationship between plant abundance in the field and PSFs...

Data from: Assessing the usefulness of Citizen Science Data for habitat suitability modelling: opportunistic reporting versus sampling based on a systematic protocol

Laura Henckel, Ute Bradter, Mari Jönsson, Nick Isaac & Tord Snäll
Aim: To evaluate the potential of models based on opportunistic reporting (OR) compared to models based on data from a systematic protocol (SP) for modelling species distributions. We compared model performance for eight forest bird species with contrasting spatial distributions, habitat requirements, and rarity. Differences in the reporting of species were also assessed. Finally, we tested potential improvement of models when inferring high quality absences from OR based on questionnaires sent to observers. Location: Both...

Genetic diversity of farmed and wild Rufiji tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis urolepis) populations

Christos Palaiokostas
Rufiji tilapia (Oreochromis urolepis urolepis) is an endemic cichlid in Tanzania. In addition to its importance for biodiversity conservation, Rufiji tilapia is also attractive for farming due to its high growth-rate, salinity tolerance, and the production of all-male hybrids when crossed with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The aim of the current study was to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of both wild and farmed Rufiji tilapia populations in order to inform conservation and...

Data from: Fire and grazing controlling a tropical tree line: Effects of long‐term grazing exclusion in Bale Mountains, Ethiopia

Maria Ulrika Johansson & Anders Granström
Aims: Tropical tree lines are often associated with abrupt shifts in vegetation, soils and disturbance regimes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We analysed the role of grazing, fuels and fire in maintaining a sharp tree line with flammable heathland above non-flammable forest. Location: Bale Mountains, Ethiopia. Methods: Grazing exclosures, repeated vegetation sampling, soil analyses and burning and sowing experiments along an altitudinal gradient with Hagenia abyssinica forest, Erica trimera forest and Erica heathland;...

Modelled spatiotemporally explicit fish densities at different fisheries management scenarios

Jonas Hentati-Sundberg
Conflicts of interest between resource extraction and conservation are widespread, and negotiating such conflicts or trade-offs is a key issue for ecosystem managers. One such trade-off is resource competition between fisheries and marine top predators. Managing this trade-off has so far been difficult due to a lack of knowledge regarding the amount and distribution of prey required by top predators. Here, we develop a framework that can be used to address this gap: a bio-energetic...

Data from: Why we should care about movements: Using spatially explicit integrated population models to assess habitat source-sink dynamics

Matthieu Paquet, Debora Arlt, Jonas Knape, Matthew Low, Pär Forslund & Tomas Pärt
1. Assessing the source-sink status of populations and habitats is of major importance for understanding population dynamics and for the management of natural populations. Sources produce a net surplus of individuals (per capita contribution to the metapopulation >1) and will be the main contributors for self-sustaining populations, whereas sinks produce a deficit (contribution < 1). However, making these types of assessments is generally hindered by the problem of separating mortality from permanent emigration, especially when...

Evolution of chain migration in an aerial insectivorous bird, the common swift Apus apus

Susanne Akesson, Phil Atkinson, Ana Bermejo, Javier De La Puente, Mauro Ferri, Chris Hewson, Jan Holmgren, Erich Kaiser, Lyndon Kearsley, Raymond Klaassen, Heikki Kolunen, Gittan Matsson, Fausto Minelli, Gabriel Norevik, Hannu Pietiäinen, Navinder J Singh, Fernando Spina, Lukas Viktora & Anders Hedenstrom
Spectacular long-distance migration has evolved repeatedly in animals enabling exploration of resources separated in time and space. In birds, these patterns are largely driven by seasonality, cost of migration, and asymmetries in competition leading most often to leap-frog migration, where northern breeding populations winter furthest to the south. Here we show that the highly aerial common swift Apus apus, spending the non-breeding period on the wing, instead exhibits a rarely-found chain migration pattern, where the...

European soil seed bank communities across a climate and land-cover gradient

Jan Plue, Hans Van Calster, Inger Auestad, Sofia Basto, Reneé M. Bekker, Hans Henrik Bruun, Richard Chevalier, Guillaume Decocq, Ulf Grandin, Martin Hermy, Hans Jacquemyn, Anna Jakobsson, Rein Kalamees, Rob H. Marrs, Bryndis Marteinsdóttir, Per Milberg, Robin J. Pakeman, Gareth Phoenix, Ken Thompson, Vigdis Vandvik, Markus Wagner, Sara A.O. Cousins, Ove Eriksson, Jamshid Ghorbani, Małgorzata Jankowska-Błaszczuk … & Alistair G. Auffret
This is the data set used for the publication Buffering effects of soil seed banks on plant community composition in response to land use and climate, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. Aim. Climate and land use are key determinants of biodiversity, with past and ongoing changes posing serious threats to global ecosystems. Unlike most other organism groups, plant species can possess dormant life-history stages such as soil seed banks, which may help...

Data from: Ecosystem service multifunctionality of low-productivity forests and implications for conservation and management

Mari Jönsson & Tord Snäll
Low-productivity forests are often the last remaining pristine forests in managed forest landscapes and typically overrepresented among protected forests. However, the provisioning of individual and multiple ecosystem services (ES-multifunctionality) by these forests remains poorly assessed, making it difficult to evaluate their importance in forest conservation and management. Using nationwide data on ecosystem services (ES) from forest plots, we test whether levels of ES-multifunctionality and individual ES differ between low-productivity forested mires and rocky outcrops in...

Data from: Resource dispersion and relatedness interact to explain space use in a solitary predator

Malin Aronsson, Mikael Åkesson, Matthew Low, Jens Persson & Henrik Andrén
Resource dispersion or kin selection are commonly used to explain animal spatial and social organization. Despite this, studies examining how these factors interact in wild populations of solitary animals are rare. We used 16 years of individual-level spatial and genetic data to disentangle how resources and relatedness influence spatial organization of a solitary predator, the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx). As expected, space-use overlap between neighbouring individuals increased when food resources were heterogeneous and unpredictably distributed...

Central place foraging in a human-dominated landscape - how do common cranes select feeding sites?

Lovisa Nilsson, Jens Persson, Nils Bunnefeld & Johan Månsson
Human infrastructure and disturbance play an important role when animals select resources in human-modified landscapes. Theory predicts that animals trade food intake against costs of movement or disturbance to optimize net energy gain and fitness, but other necessary resources may also constrain the decisions, e.g. when animals repeatedly need to return to a central location, such as a nest, waterhole or night roost. Central place foraging theory states that the probability of occurrence of an...

Examining the link between relaxed predation and bird colouration on islands

Louis Bliard, Matthieu Paquet, Aloïs Robert, Paul Dufour, Julien Renoult, Arnaud Gregoire, Pierre-Andre Crochet, Rita Covas & Claire Doutrelant
Insular ecosystems share analogous ecological conditions, leading to patterns of convergent evolution that are collectively termed the “island syndrome”. In birds, part of this syndrome is a tendency for a duller plumage, possibly as a result of relaxed sexual selection and the reduced need for species recognition. Despite this global pattern, some insular species display a more colourful plumage than their mainland relatives, but why this occurs has remained unexplained. Here, we examine the hypothesis...

Data from: Molecular mapping and identification of quantitative trait loci for domestication traits in field cress (Lepidium campestre L.) genome

Zeratsion Abera Desta, Dirk-Jan De Koning & Rodomiro Ortiz
Lepidium campestre (L.) or field cress is a multifaceted oilseed plant, which has not been domesticated yet. Moreover, the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying the domestication traits of field cress remain largely elusive. The overarching goal is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that are fundamental for domestication of field cress. Mapping and dissecting quantitative trait variation may provide important insights into genomic trajectories underlying field cress domestication. We used 7624 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)...

Unexpectedly diverse forest dung beetle communities in degraded rainforest landscapes in Madagascar

Kaisa Torppa, Helena Wirta & Ilkka Hanski
Tropical forests, which harbor high levels of biodiversity, are being lost at an alarming speed. Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot, has lost more than half of its original forest cover. Most of the remaining forests are small fragments of primary and secondary forest with differing degrees of human impact. These forests, as well as coffee and fruit plantations, may be important in supporting the forest dependent biodiversity in Madagascar but this has been little studied. In...

Data offspring performance following two-donor crosses at different floral stages and with different competitor types in greenhouse studies of Collinsia heterophylla

Åsa Lankinen, Josefin Madjidian, Henrik G. Smith & Stefan Andersson
Data on two offspring performance traits (seeds per capsule and flower number) in greenhouse studies of Collinsia heterophylla to investigate indirect benefits of mate choice. We performed two-donor pollinations during successive floral stages and with different competitor types (outcross and self) to assess how stigma receptivity and two pollen traits known to affect siring success influence offspring performance. We also investigated the link between seed production in mothers and offspring as an indication of heritability...

Forest inventory data from Finland and Sweden for: Demographic performance of European tree species at their hot and cold climatic edges, plus ancillary climate data

Sophia Ratcliffe, Jonas Dahlgren, Aleksi Lehtonen, Christian Wirth, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Miguel A. Zavala, Gerald Kaendler, Raisa Mäkipää & Georges Kunstler
1. Species range limits are thought to result from a decline in demographic performance at range edges. However, recent studies reporting contradictory patterns in species demographic performance at their edges cast doubt on our ability to predict climate change demographic impacts. To understand these inconsistent demographic responses at the edges, we need to shift the focus from geographic to climatic edges and analyse how species responses vary with climatic constraints at the edge and species’...

A large wild salmon stock shows genetic and life history differentiation within, but not between, rivers

Antti Miettinen, Stefan Palm, Johan Dannewitz, Emma Lind, Craig R. Primmer, Atso Romakkaniemi, Johan Östergren & Victoria L. Pritchard
Anadromous salmonid fishes frequently exhibit strong geographic population structuring. However, population genetic differentiation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at fine geographic scales differs across equivalent spatial extents in different regions. So far, fine-scale genetic differentiation has not been assessed in rivers of the Baltic Sea, a region that contains an evolutionarily distinct Atlantic salmon lineage. Thus, Baltic salmon are currently managed on the river level, without focus on potential genetic structure and diversity within rivers....

Registration Year

  • 2020
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56

Affiliations

  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    56
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    5
  • University of Helsinki
    5
  • Stockholm University
    4
  • University of Turku
    4
  • Lund University
    3
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • Polish Academy of Sciences
    2
  • University of Picardie Jules Verne
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2