84 Works

Data from: Season rather than habitat affects lynx survival and risk of mortality in the human-dominated landscape of southern Sweden

Henrik Andren, Aronsson Malin, José V. Lopez-Bao, Gustaf Samelius, Guillaume Chapron, Geir Rune Rauset, Heather Hemmingmoore & Jens Persson
Landscapes are mosaics of habitat associated with different risks and resources, including human activities, which can affect individual survival in wildlife. Different relationships between habitat characteristics and human-caused and natural mortality can result in attractive sinks. We used individual-based data from 97 Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) monitored for 160 exposure years to link adult survival and the risk of mortality to home range habitat characteristics in the human-dominated landscape of southern Sweden. Human-caused mortality dominated...

Organic fertilization suppresses aphid growth via carabids in the absence of specialist predators

Guillermo Aguilera Núñez
Biological control by natural enemies is a valuable ecosystem service. The predator community in a crop field is a combination of predators dwelling in the field and those moving into it from the surrounding landscape. The former is mainly affected by field management, the latter more by the composition of the surrounding landscape. Yet, separate and combined effects of local and landscape management on pest suppression have seldom been investigated. We set-up mesocosms within an...

The female pheromone (Z)-4-undecenal mediates flight attraction and courtship in Drosophila melanogaster

Peter Witzgall, Felipe Borrero-Echeverry, Marit Solum, Federica Trona, Erika A. Wallin, Marie Bengtsson, Peter Witzgall & Sebastien Lebreton
Specific mate communication and recognition underlies reproduction and hence speciation. Mate communication evolves during adaptation to ecological niches and makes use of social signals and habitat cues. Our study provides new insights in Drosophila melanogaster premating olfactory communication, showing that female pheromone (Z)-4-undecenal (Z4-11Al) and male pheromone cVA interact with food odour in a sex-specific manner. Furthermore, Z4-11Al, which mediates upwind flight attraction in both sexes, also elicits courtship in experienced males. Twin variants of...

Age at first reproduction in wolves: different patterns of density dependence for females and males

Camilla Wikenros, Morgane Gicquel, Barbara Zimmermann, Øystein Flagstad & Mikael Åkesson
Age at first reproduction constitutes a key life history trait in animals and is evolutionary shaped by fitness benefits and costs of delayed versus early reproduction. The understanding of how intrinsic and extrinsic changes affects age at first reproduction is crucial for conservation and management of threatened species because of its demographic effects on population growth and generation time. For a period of 40 years in the Scandinavian wolf (Canis lupus) population, including the recolonization...

Data from: Reindeer control over subarctic treeline alters soil fungal communities with potential consequences for soil carbon storage

Henni Ylänne, Rieke L. Madsen, Carles Castaño, Daniel B. Metcalfe & Karina E. Clemmensen
Here we present the data and R script from “Reindeer control over subarctic treeline alters soil fungal communities with potential consequences for soil carbon storage” by Henni Ylänne, Rieke L. Madsen, Carles Castaño, Daniel B. Metcalfe and Karina E. Clemmensen (Global Change Biology, 2021). In this study we reported the impacts of grazing regime and mountain birch vicinity on the abundance, diversity and community composition of the soil fungal community, and explored how the soil...

Disentangling the nonlinear effects of habitat complexity on functional responses

Julien Mocq, Pavel Soukup, Joacim Näslund & David Boukal
1. Structural complexity of habitats modifies trophic interactions by providing refuges and altering predator and prey behaviour. Nonlinear effects on trophic interaction strengths driven by these mechanisms may alter food web dynamics and community structure in response to habitat modifications. However, changes in functional response, the relationship between prey density and feeding rate, along habitat complexity (HC) gradients are little understood. 2. We quantified functional responses along a HC gradient from an entirely unstructured to...

Data from: Thermal differences between juveniles and adults increased over time in European forest trees

Maria Mercedes Caron, Florian Zellweger, Kris Verheyen, Lander Baeten, Radim Hédl, Bernhardt-Römermann Markus, Imre Berki, Jörg Brunet, Guillaume Decocq, Sandra Díaz, Thomas Dirnböck, Tomasz Durak, Thilo Heinken, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Martin Kopecký, Jonathan Lenoir, Martin Macek, Malicki Marek, František Máliš, Thomas Nagel, Michael Perring, Petr Petřík, Kamila Reczyńska, Remigiusz Pielech, Wolfgang Schmidt … & Pieter De Frenne
Woody species’ requirements and environmental sensitivity change from seedlings to adults, a process referred to as ontogenetic shift. Such shifts can be increased by climate change. To assess the changes in the difference of temperature experienced by seedlings and adults in the context of climate change, it is essential to have reliable climatic data over long periods that capture the thermal conditions experienced by the individuals throughout their life cycle. Here we used a unique...

Distribution of large carnivores in Europe 2012 - 2016: Distribution maps for Brown bear, Eurasian lynx, Grey wolf, and Wolverine

Petra Kaczensky, John D.C. Linnell, Djuro Huber, Manuela Von Arx, Henrik Andren, Urs Breitenmoser & Luigi Boitani
Regular assessments of species’ status are an essential component of conservation planning and adaptive management. They allow the progress of past or ongoing conservation actions to be evaluated and can be used to redirect and prioritise future conservation actions. Most countries perform periodic assessments for their own national adaptive management procedures or national red lists. Furthermore, the countries of the European Union have to report on the status of all species listed on the directives...

Punctuational ecological changes rather than global factors drive species diversification and the evolution of wing phenotypes in Morpho butterflies

Nicolas Chazot, Patrick Blandin, Vincent Debat, Marianne Elias & Fabien Condamine
Assessing the relative importance of geographical and ecological drivers of evolution is paramount to understand the diversification of species and traits at the macroevolutionary scale. Here, we use an integrative approach, combining phylogenetics, biogeography, ecology, and quantified phenotypes to investigate the drivers of both species and phenotypic diversification of the iconic Neotropical butterfly genus Morpho. We generated a time-calibrated phylogeny for all known species and inferred historical biogeography. We fitted models of time-dependent (accounting for...

Variation in developmental rates is not linked to environmental unpredictability in annual killifishes

Piotr Rowinski, Will Sowersby, Joacim Näslund, Simon Eckerström-Liedholm, Karl Gotthard & Björn Rogell
Comparative evidence suggests that adaptive plasticity may evolve as a response to predictable environmental variation. However, less attention has been placed on unpredictable environmental variation, which is considered to affect evolutionary trajectories by increasing phenotypic variation (or bet-hedging). Here, we examine the occurrence of bet-hedging in egg developmental rates in seven species of annual killifish that originate from a gradient of variation in precipitation rates, under three treatment incubation temperatures (21°C, 23°C, and 25°C). In...

Biochar increases tree biomass in a managed boreal forest, but does not alter N2O, CH4, and CO2 emissions

Roger Grau-Andrés, Melissa RA Pingree, Mats G Öquist, David A Wardle, Marie-Charlotte Nilsson & Michael J Gundale
Biochar soil amendment may provide the forestry sector with a formidable tool to simultaneously sequester carbon (C) in the soil and aboveground by enhancing plant productivity, yet several key uncertainties remain. Crucially, empirical evidence of long-term effects of biochar management on vegetation and on greenhouse gas emissions in forest ecosystems is scarce. Using a large field experiment in a young managed boreal forest in northern Sweden, we investigated the effects of biochar (applied either on...

The legacy of forest disturbance on stream ecosystem functioning

André Frainer & Brendan McKie
1. Forest clearance is a pervasive disturbance worldwide, but many of its impacts are regarded as transient, diminishing in intensity as forest recovers. However, forests can take decades to centuries to recover after severe disturbances, and temporal lags in recovery of ecosystem properties for different forest habitats are mostly unknown. This includes forest streams, where most studies of the impacts of forest clearance are restricted to the first years of recovery, typically finding that temporary...

Tree water uptake enhances nitrogen acquisition in a fertilized boreal forest – but not under nitrogen poor conditions

Nils Henriksson, Hyungwoo Lim, John Marchall, Oskar Franklin, Ross McMurtrie, Reimo Lutter, Ruth Magh, Tomas Lundmark & Torgny Näsholm
Understanding how plant water uptake interacts with acquisition of soil nitrogen (N) and other nutrients is fundamental for predicting plant responses to a changing environment, but it is an area where models disagree. We present a novel isotopic labelling approach which reveals spatial patterns of water and N uptake, and their interaction, by trees. The stable isotopes 15N and 2H were applied to a small area of the forest floor in stands with high and...

Environmental and seasonal correlates of capercaillie movement traits in a Swedish wind farm

Jim-Lino Kämmerle, Julia Taubmann, Henrik Andrén, Wolfgang Fiedler & Joy Coppes
Animals continuously interact with their environment through behavioural decisions, rendering the appropriate choice of movement speed and directionality an important phenotypic trait. Anthropogenic activities may alter animal behaviour, including movement. A detailed understanding of movement decisions is therefore of great relevance for science and conservation alike. The study of movement decisions in relation to environmental and seasonal cues requires continuous observation of movement behaviour, recently made possible by high-resolution telemetry. We studied movement traits of...

Data for: Parasitoids indicate major climate-induced shifts in Arctic communities

Tuomas Kankaanpää, Eero Vesterinen, Bess Hardwick, Niels Martin Martin Schmidt, Tommi Andersson, Paul Eric Aspholm, Isabel Barrio, Niklas Beckers, Joël Bêty, Tone Birkemoe, Melissa DeSiervo, Katherine Drotos, Dorothee Ehrich, Olivier Gilg, Vladimir Gilg, Nils Hein, Toke Høye, Kristian Jakobsen, Camille Jodouin, Jesse Jorna, Mikhail Kozlov, Jean-Claude Kresse, Don-Jean Leandri-Breton, Nicolas Lecomte, Maia Olsen … & Tomas Roslin
Climatic impacts are especially pronounced in the Arctic, which as a region is warming twice as fast as the rest of the globe. Here, we investigate how mean climatic conditions and rates of climatic change impact parasitoid insect communities in 16 localities across the Arctic. We focus on parasitoids in a wide-spread habitat, Dryas heathlands, and describe parasitoid community composition in terms of larval host use (i.e. parasitoid use of herbivorous Lepidoptera versus pollinating Diptera)...

Data from: The future of invasive terrestrial vertebrates in Europe under climate and land-use change

Ester Polaina, Alaaeldin Soultan, Tomas Pärt & Mariano R. Recio
Predicting suitable locations for invasive alien terrestrial vertebrates (IATV) under different scenarios of global change is essential for local and transboundary management aimed to prevent the spread of invasions. Using a spatial modelling approach adapted to invasive species, we identify range-shifts in suitable areas for 15 of the most harmful IATV in Europe, considering future climate and land-use changes. We predict range contractions for seven of these IATV, expansion for four, and inconclusive outputs for...

Conservation of Birds in Fragmented Landscapes Requires Protected Areas

Robert Timmers, Marijke Van Kuijk, Pita Verweij, Jaboury Ghazoul, Yann Hautier, William Laurance, Stefan Arriaga-Weiss, Robert Askins, Corrado Battisti, Åke Berg, Gretchen Daily, Cristián Estades, Beatrice Frank, Reiko Kurosawa, Rosamund Pojar, John Woinarski & Merel Soons
For successful conservation of biodiversity, it is vital to know whether protected areas in increasingly fragmented landscapes effectively conserve species. However, how large habitat fragments must be and what level of protection is required to sustain species, remains poorly known. We compiled a global dataset on almost 2000 bird species in 741 forest fragments varying in size and protection status, and show that protection is associated with higher bird occurrence, especially for threatened species. Protection...

Size, connectivity and edge effects of stream habitats explain spatiotemporal variation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) density

Carl Tamario, Erik Degerman, Daniela Polic, Petter Tibblin & Anders Forsman
Ecological theory postulates that size and isolation of habitat patches impact the colonization/extinction dynamics that determine community species richness and population persistence. Given the key role of lotic habitats for life history completion in rheophilic fish, evaluating how the distribution of swift-flowing habitats affects the abundance and dynamics of subpopulations is essential. Using extensive electrofishing data, we show that merging island biogeography with meta-population theory, where lotic habitats are considered as islands in a lentic...

Fast life-histories are associated with larger brain size in killifishes

Will Sowersby, Simon Eckerström-Liedholm, Alexander Kotrschal, Joacim Näslund, Piotr Rowiński, Alejandro Gonzalez-Voyer & Björn Rogell
The high energetic demands associated with the vertebrate brain are proposed to result in a trade-off between the pace of life-history and relative brain size. However, because both life-history and brain size also have a strong relationship with body size, any associations between the pace of life-history and relative brain size may be confounded by coevolution with body size. Studies on systems where contrasts in the pace of life-history occur without concordant contrasts in body...

Moose omics dataframe

Christian Fohringer
With accelerated land conversion and global heating at northern latitudes, it becomes crucial to understand, how life histories of animals in extreme environments adapt to these changes. Animals may either adapt by adjusting foraging behaviour or through physiological responses, including adjusting their energy metabolism or both. Until now, it has been difficult to study such adaptations in free ranging animals due to methodological constraints that prevent extensive spatiotemporal coverage of ecological and physiological data. Through...

Root traits and soil microorganisms as drivers of plant-soil feedbacks within the sub-arctic tundra meadow

Clydecia Spitzer, David Wardle, Björn Lindahl, Maja Sundqvist, Michael Gundale, Nicolas Fanin & Paul Kardol
Plant-soil feedback (PSF) can influence the composition of various soil microorganisms (antagonistic and mutualistic), which can have reciprocal effects on plants. At the same time, we do not understand the effects of fine root traits in moderating microbial-driven PSF. We therefore conducted a greenhouse study to aid in understanding the relationship between root traits, soil community composition (PLFAs and high-throughput sequencing data) and plant-soil feedback (PSF). These data therefore include datasets with fine root traits,...

Data from: Collapse, reorganization, and regime identity: breaking down past management paradigms in a forest-grassland ecotone

Victoria Donovan, Caleb Roberts, Carissa Wonkka, Daniel Uden, David Angeler, Craig Allen, David Wedin, Rhae Drijber & Dirac Twidwell
The identity of an ecological regime is central to modern resilience theory and our understanding of how systems collapse and reorganize following disturbance. However, resilience-based models used in ecosystem management have been criticized for their failure to integrate disturbance outcomes into regime identity. Assessments are needed to understand how well these classifications represent ecosystem responses that occur over management relevant time scales. We tracked post-wildfire forest and grassland dynamics 27 years after wildfire in eastern...

HARVEST : Harvest behaviour in common pool resource systems

Kwabena Afriyie Owusu, Micaela M. Kulesz & Agostino Merico
We conducted continuous-time Common Pool Resource (CPR) experiments where resource users were allowed to (1) harvest from a dynamically varying resource (mimicking a fishery) and (2) change their extraction behavior in real-time under different treatments namely, communication and no communication. The experiments were conducted at the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research in Bremen, Germany in August 2015 and February 2016 with a total of 70 participants. This data is the resource levels and efforts...

Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans

Inger Skrede, Claude Murat, Jaqueline Hess, Sundy Maurice, Jørn Henrik Sønstebø, Annegret Kohler, Dominique Barry-Etienne, Dan Eastwood, Nils Högberg, Francis Martin & Håvard Kauserud
Globalization and international trade have impacted organisms around the world leading to a considerable number of species establishing in new geographic areas. Many organisms have taken advantage of human-made environments, including buildings. One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, which is the most aggressive wood-decay fungus in indoor environments in temperate regions. Using population genomic analyses of 36 full genome sequenced isolates, we demonstrated that European and Japanese isolates are highly divergent...

Data from: Urbanization affects oak–pathogen interactions across spatial scales

Laura Van Dijk, Xoaquin Moreira, Anna Barr, Luis Abdala-Roberts, Bastien Castagneyrol, Maria Faticov, Bess Hardwick, Jan Ten Hoopen, Raul De La Mata, Ricardo Matheus Pires, Tomas Roslin, Dmitry Schigel, Bart Timmermans & Ayco Tack
The world is rapidly urbanizing, thereby transforming natural landscapes and changing the abundance and distribution of organisms. However, insights into the effects of urbanization on species interactions, and plant-pathogen interactions in particular, are lacking. We investigated the effects of urbanization on powdery mildew infection on Quercus robur at continental and within-city scales. At the continental scale, we compared infection levels between urban and rural areas of different-sized cities in Europe, and investigated whether plant traits,...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    84

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    84

Affiliations

  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    84
  • Stockholm University
    8
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    7
  • Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences
    4
  • University of Helsinki
    4
  • Ghent University
    3
  • Nanyang Technological University
    3
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    3
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    3
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    2