7 Works

Data from: Sustained miniaturization and anatomical innovation in the dinosaurian ancestors of birds

Andrea Cau, Gareth J. Dyke, Michael S. Y. Lee & Darren Naish
Recent discoveries have highlighted the dramatic evolutionary transformation of massive, ground-dwelling theropod dinosaurs into light, volant birds. Here, we apply Bayesian approaches (originally developed for inferring geographic spread and rates of molecular evolution in viruses) in a different context: to infer size changes and rates of anatomical innovation (across up to 1549 skeletal characters) in fossils. These approaches identify two drivers underlying the dinosaur-bird transition. The theropod lineage directly ancestral to birds undergoes sustained miniaturization...

Data from: Phylogeography of the Australian freshwater turtle Chelodina expansa reveals complex relationships among inland and coastal bioregions

Kate Hodges, Arthur Georges, Steve Donnellan & Stephen Donnellan
We examined range-wide mitochondrial phylogeographic structure in the riverine freshwater turtle Chelodina expansa to determine if this species exhibits deep genetic divergence between coastal and inland hydrological provinces as seen in co-distributed freshwater taxa. We sequenced two mitochondrial loci, genealogical relationships were assessed using a network approach, and relationships among biogeographic regions were tested using analyses of molecular variance. Population history was evaluated using neutrality tests, indices of demographic expansion, and mismatch analyses. Twenty one...

Data from: Opsin transcripts of predatory diving beetles: a comparison of surface and subterranean photic niches

Simon M. Tierney, Steven J. B. Cooper, Kathleen M. Saint, Terry Bertozzi, Josephine Hyde, William F. Humphreys & Andrew D. Austin
The regressive evolution of eyes has long intrigued biologists yet the genetic underpinnings remain opaque. A system of discrete aquifers in arid Australia provides a powerful comparative means to explore trait regression at the genomic level. Multiple surface ancestors from two tribes of diving beetles (Dytiscidae) repeatedly invaded these calcrete aquifers and convergently evolved eye-less phenotypes. We use this system to assess transcription of opsin photoreceptor genes among the transcriptomes of two surface and three...

Data from: A multigene molecular assessment of cryptic biodiversity in the iconic freshwater blackfishes (Teleostei: Percichthyidae: Gadopsis) of south-eastern Australia

Michael P. Hammer, Peter J. Unmack, Mark Adams, Tarmo A. Raadik & Jerald B. Johnson
Freshwater biodiversity is under ever increasing threat from human activities, and its conservation and management require a sound knowledge of species-level taxonomy. Cryptic biodiversity is a common feature for aquatic systems, particularly in Australia, where recent genetic assessments suggest that the actual number of freshwater fish species may be considerably higher than currently listed. The freshwater blackfishes (genus Gadopsis) are an iconic group in south-eastern Australia and, in combination with their broad, naturally divided distribution...

Data from: Crossing the line: increasing body size in a trans-Wallacean lizard radiation (Cyrtodactylus, Gekkota)

Paul M. Oliver, Phillip Skipwith & Michael S. Y. Lee
The region between the Asian and Australian continental plates (Wallacea) demarcates the transition between two differentiated regional biotas. Despite this striking pattern, some terrestrial lineages have successfully traversed the marine barriers of Wallacea and subsequently diversified in newly colonized regions. The hypothesis that these dispersals between biogeographic realms are correlated with detectable shifts in evolutionary trajectory has however rarely been tested. Here, we analyse the evolution of body size in a widespread and exceptionally diverse...

Data from: Global biodiversity assessment and hyper-cryptic species complexes: more than one species of elephant in the room?

Mark Adams, Tarmo A. Raadik, Christopher P. Burridge & Arthur Georges
Several recent estimates of global biodiversity have concluded that the total number of species on Earth lies near the lower end of the wide range touted in previous decades. However, none of these recent estimates formally explore the real ‘elephant in the room’, namely, what proportion of species are taxonomically invisible to conventional assessments, and thus, as undiagnosed cryptic species, remain uncountable until revealed by multi-gene molecular assessments. Here we explore the significance and extent...

Data from: Microsatellite markers from the Ion Torrent: a multi-species contrast to 454 shotgun sequencing

Carole P. Elliott, Neal J. Enright, Richard J. N. Allcock, Michael G. Gardner, Emese Meglécz, Janet Anthony & Siegfried L. Krauss
The development and screening of microsatellite markers have been accelerated by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and in particular GS-FLX pyro-sequencing (454). More recent platforms such as the PGM semiconductor sequencer (Ion Torrent) offer potential benefits such as dramatic reductions in cost, but to date have not been well utilized. Here, we critically compare the advantages and disadvantages of microsatellite development using PGM semiconductor sequencing and GS-FLX pyro-sequencing for two gymnosperm (a conifer and a cycad)...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • South Australian Museum
    7
  • University of Adelaide
    3
  • University of Canberra
    3
  • Murdoch University
    1
  • Western Australian Museum
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • Flinders University
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • University of Southampton
    1