4 Works

Data from: Palaeoecological inferences for the fossil Australian snakes Yurlunggur and Wonambi (Serpentes, Madtsoiidae)

Alessandro Palci, Mark N. Hutchinson, Michael W. Caldwell, John D. Scanlon, Michael S.Y. Lee & Michael S. Y. Lee
Madtsoiids are among the most basal snakes, with a fossil record dating back to the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian). Most representatives went extinct by the end of the Eocene, but some survived in Australia until the late Cenozoic. Yurlunggur and Wonambi are two of these late forms, and also the best-known madtsoiids to date. A better understanding of the anatomy and palaeoecology of these taxa may shed light on the evolution and extinction of this poorly...

Data from: Specific MHC class I supertype associated with parasite infection and colour morph in a wild lizard population

Jessica D. Hacking, Devi Stuart-Fox, Stephanie S. Godfrey & Michael G. Gardner
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a large gene family that plays a central role in the immune system of all jawed vertebrates. Non-avian reptiles are under-represented within the MHC literature and little is understood regarding the mechanisms maintaining MHC diversity in this vertebrate group. Here, we examined the relative roles of parasite-mediated selection and sexual selection in maintaining MHC class I diversity of a colour polymorphic lizard. We discovered evidence for parasite-mediated selection acting...

Data from: Avian predation intensity as a driver of clinal variation in colour morph frequency

Genevieve Matthews, Celine T. Goulet, Kaspar Delhey, Zak S. Atkins, Geoffrey M. While, Michael G. Gardner & David G. Chapple
1) Phenotypic variation provides the framework for natural selection to work upon, enabling adaptive evolution. One of the most discernible manifestations of phenotypic variability is colour variation. When this variation is discrete, genetically-based colour pattern morphs occur simultaneously within a population. 2) Why and how colour polymorphisms are maintained is an evolutionary puzzle. Several evolutionary drivers have been hypothesized as influencing clinal patterns of morph frequency, with spatial variation in climate and predation being considered...

Data from: Selection outweighs drift at a fine scale: lack of MHC differentiation within a family living lizard across geographically close but disconnected rocky outcrops

Sarah K. Pearson, C. Michael Bull & Michael G. Gardner
The highly polymorphic genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are involved in disease resistance, mate choice, and kin recognition. Therefore, they are widely used markers for investigating adaptive variation. Although selection is the key driver, gene flow and genetic drift also influence adaptive genetic variation, sometimes in opposing ways and with consequences for adaptive potential. To further understand the processes that generate MHC variation, it is helpful to compare variation at the MHC with...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Flinders University
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  • South Australian Museum
    4
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • University of Otago
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  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • La Trobe University
    1
  • Monash University
    1
  • UNSW Sydney
    1