32 Works

Herbivores reduce seedling recruitment in alpine plant communities

Øystein H. Opedal, Kristin Nystuen, Dagmar Hagen, Håkon Holien, Mia Sørensen, Simone Lang, Sigrid Lindmo, G. RIchard Strimbeck & Bente Graae
Through changes in climate and other environmental factors, alpine tundra ecosystems are subject to increased cover of erect shrubs, reduced predictability of rodent dynamics, and changes in wild and domesticated herbivore densities. To predict the dynamics of these ecosystems, we need to understand how these simultaneous changes affect alpine vegetation. In the long term, vegetation dynamics may depend critically on seedling recruitment. To study drivers of alpine plant seedling recruitment, we set up a field...

Data from: Draining the pool? Carbon storage and fluxes in three alpine plant communities

Mia Vedel Sørensen, Richard Strimbeck, Kristin Odden Nystuen, Rozalia Erzsebet Kapas, Brian J. Enquist & Bente Jessen Graae
Shrub communities have expanded in arctic and alpine tundra during recent decades. Changes in shrub abundance may alter ecosystem carbon (C) sequestration and storage, with potential positive or negative feedback on global C cycling. To assess potential implications of shrub expansion in different alpine plant communities, we compared C fluxes and pools in one Empetrum-dominated heath, one herb- and cryptogam-dominated meadow, and one Salix-shrub community in Central Norway. Over two growing seasons, we measured Gross...

Data from: Parasite escape through trophic specialization in a species flock

Pascal I. Hablützel, Maarten P.M. Vanhove, Pablo Deschepper, Arnout F. Grégoir, Anna K. Roose, Filip A.M. Volckaert & Joost A.M. Raeymaekers
Adaptive radiation occurs when species diversify rapidly to occupy an array of ecological niches. Since opportunities for parasite infection and transmission may greatly vary among these niches, adaptive radiation is expected to be associated with a turnover of the parasite community. As major agents of natural and sexual selection, parasites may play a central role in host diversification. The study of parasite turnover may thus be of general relevance and could significantly improve our understanding...

Sunflower seed predation rates in Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function in Tropical Agriculture (BEFTA) plots, Kandista and Ujun Tanjung estates, Indonesia

A. E. Eycott, E.C. Turner, S. H. Luke & A. D. Advento
Data comprise sunflower seed predation rates (i.e. number of seeds remaining) after 24 hours under different treatments in 18 experimental plots plots established in 2013 as part of the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function in Tropical Agriculture (BEFTA) programme. Eighteen plots were examined across three estates – plots in Ujung Tanjung and Kandista estates were planted in 1987 to 1992 and are mature or over-mature oil palm, while Libo plots were replanted in 2014. Plots were...

Data from: Quantifying risk of overharvest when implementation is uncertain

Lasse F. Eriksen, Pål F. Moa & Erlend B. Nilsen
1. Sustainable harvest management implies an ability to control harvest rates. This is challenging in systems that have limited control of resources and resource users, which is often the case in small game harvest management. The difference between management strategies and actual harvest bag size (i.e. implementation uncertainty) may be substantial, but few studies have explored this. 2. We investigated how different management strategies and ecosystem variables affected realised harvest of willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus...

Population and seascape genomics of a critically endangered benthic elasmobranch, the blue skate Dipturus batis

Aurelien Delaval, Michelle Frost, Victoria Bendall, Stuart Hetherington, David Stirling, Galice Hoarau, Catherine Jones & Leslie Noble
The blue skate (Dipturus batis) has a patchy distribution across the North-East Atlantic Ocean, largely restricted to occidental seas around the British Isles following fisheries-induced population declines and extirpations. The viability of remnant populations remains uncertain, and could be impacted by continued fishing and bycatch pressure and the projected impacts of climate change. We genotyped 503 samples of D. batis, obtained opportunistically from the widest available geographic range, across 6,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using...

In a comfort zone and beyond – ecological plasticity of key marine mediators

Emilia Trudnowska, Kaja Balazy, Joanna Stoń-Egiert, Irina Smolina, Thomas A. Brown & Marta Gluchowska
Copepods of the genus Calanus are the key components of zooplankton. Understanding their response to a changing climate is crucial to predict the functioning of future warmer high-latitude ecosystems. Although specific Calanus species are morphologically very similar, they have different life strategies and roles in ecosystems. In this study, C. finmarchicus and C. glacialis were thoroughly studied with regard to their plasticity in morphology and ecology both in their preferred original water mass (Atlantic vs....

Calanus InDel genotypes from: No evidence for hybridization between Calanus finmarchicus and C. glacialis in a subarctic area of sympatry

Marvin Choquet, Gauthier Burckard, Stig Skreslet, Galice Hoarau & Janne E. Søreide
In the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean, four species of the copepod genus Calanus dominate the zooplankton biomass. Because of their morphological resemblance, knowledge of their respective distribution range has long been biased by misidentification, until the recent use of molecular tools uncovered numerous areas of sympatry. As hybridization between Calanus finmarchicus and C. glacialis has been claimed in the East-Canadian Arctic based on microsatellites, we investigated further the potential for interbreeding in newly...

Fear the reaper: ungulate carcasses may generate an ephemeral landscape of fear for rodents

Shane Frank, Rakel Blaalid, Martin Mayer, Andreas Zedrosser & Sam Steyaert
Animal carcasses provide an ephemeral pulse of nutrients for scavengers that utilize them. Carcass sites can increase species interactions and/or ephemeral, localized landscapes of fear for prey within the vicinity. Few studies have applied the landscape of fear to carcasses. Here we use a mass die-off of reindeer caused by lightning in Norway to test whether rodents avoided larger scavengers (e.g. corvids and fox). We used the presence and abundance of faeces as a proxy...

Do genetic differences in growth thermal reaction norms maintain genetic variation in timing of diapause induction?

Erlend Fossen, Joost Raeymaekers & Sigurd Einum
An optimal timing for diapause induction through the sexual production of dormant propagules is expected in organisms with temporary populations. Yet, empirical studies often find high within-population genetic variation in the sexual production of such propagules, suggesting that this is a common feature of such organisms. Here, we hypothesize that genetic variation in the propensity to produce dormant propagules, Pd, is maintained by a genotype-by-environment interaction in clonal reproductive rates, where fast-growing genotypes within an...

Directed endozoochorous dispersal by scavengers facilitate sexual reproduction in otherwise clonal plants at cadaver sites

Mie P. Arnberg, Shane C. Frank, Rakel Blaalid, Marie L. Davey, Amy E. Eycott & Sam M. J. G. Steyaert
The regeneration niche of many plant species involves spatially and temporally unpredictable disturbances, called recruitment windows of opportunity. However, even species with clear dispersal adaptations such as fleshy berries may not successfully reach such elusive regeneration microsites. Ericaceous, berry-producing species in the northern hemisphere demonstrate this dispersal limitation. They are said to display a reproductive paradox owing to their lack of regeneration in apparently suitable microsites despite considerable investment in producing large quantities of berries....

Data from: Does egg carotenoid improve larval quality in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus)?

Torvald B. Egeland, Jarle Tryti Nordeide & Einar Skarstad Egeland
Females in mutually ornamented species are often less conspicuously ornamented than their male conspecifics. It has been hypothesized that offspring quality may decrease if females invest more resources into ornaments at the expense of resources in eggs. An experiment was carried out to test whether natural variation in carotenoid in the eggs from a wild population of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) was associated with survival and growth of their offspring until hatching. Wild Arctic charr...

Data from: Phylogeographic differentiation versus transcriptomic adaptation to warm temperatures in Zostera marina, a globally important seagrass

Alexander Jueterbock, Susanne U. Franssen, Nina Bergmann, Jenny Gu, James A. Coyer, Thorsten B. H. Reusch, Erich Bornberg-Bauer & Jeanine L. Olsen
Populations distributed across a broad thermal cline are instrumental in addressing adaptation to increasing temperatures under global warming. Using a space-for-time substitution design, we tested for parallel adaptation to warm temperatures along two independent thermal clines in Zostera marina, the most widely distributed seagrass in the temperate Northern Hemisphere. A North–South pair of populations was sampled along the European and North American coasts and exposed to a simulated heatwave in a common-garden mesocosm. Transcriptomic responses...

Data from: Spawning behaviour of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus): spawning synchrony, vibrational communication and mate guarding

Magnus B. Brattli, Torvald B. Egeland, Jarle T. Nordeide & Ivar Folstad
A mismatch between male and female gamete release in external fertilizers can result in reduced or failed fertilization, sperm competition and reduced paternity. Here, spawning behaviour of free-living Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) was video recorded, and their reproductive behaviour was analysed. From evaluating 157 spawning events we observed that females mainly spawned with a guarding male and the female and the guarding male synchronized timing of gamete releaseunder sperm competition. Although sneakers spawned with higher...

Dataset to study the population genomics of introduced Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758)) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: repeated introductions since colonial times with multiple sources

Mare Geraerts, Carl Vangestel, Tom Artois, Jorge Manuel De Oliveira Fernandes, Michiel W. P. Jorissen, Auguste Chocha Manda, Célestin Danadu Mizani, Karen Smeets, Jos Snoeks, Gontran Sonet, Yang Tingbao, Maarten Van Steenberge, Emmanuel Vreven, Soleil Lunkayilakio Wamuini, Maarten P. M. Vanhove & Tine Huyse
During colonial times, Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758) was introduced in non-native parts of the Congo Basin (Democratic Republic of the Congo, DRC) for the first time. Currently, it is the most farmed cichlid in the DRC, and is present throughout the Congo Basin. Although Nile tilapia has been reported as an invasive species, documentation of historical introductions into this basin and its consequences are scant. Here, we study the genetic consequences of these...

Data for: Warming temperatures limit the maximum body length of teleost fishes across a latitudinal gradient in Norwegian waters

Charles P. Lavin, Cesc Gordó-Vilaseca, Mark John Costello, Zhiyuan Shi, Fabrice Stephenson & Arnaud Grüss
As the majority of marine organisms are water-breathing ectotherms, temperature and dissolved oxygen are key environmental variables that influence their fitness and geographic distribution. In line with the gill-oxygen limitation theory (GOLT), the maximum asymptotic body size of water-breathing ectotherms is limited by an insufficient amount of oxygen that is supplied to meet metabolic demand once a threshold of gill surface area to body weight ratio is surpassed. Here we employed generalised additive models (GAMs)...

Past and future decline of tropical pelagic biodiversity

Moriaki Yasuhara, Chih-Lin Wei, Michal Kucera, Mark Costello, Derek Tittensor, Wolfgang Kiessling, Timothy Bonebrake, Clay Tabor, Ran Feng, Andrés Baselga, Kerstin Kretschmer, Buntarou Kusumoto & Yasuhiro Kubota
A major research question concerning global pelagic biodiversity remains unanswered: when did the apparent tropical biodiversity depression (i.e., bimodality of latitudinal diversity gradient [LDG]) begin? The bimodal LDG may be a consequence of recent ocean warming or of deep-time evolutionary speciation and extinction processes. Using rich time-slice datasets of planktonic foraminifers, we show here that a unimodal (or only weakly bimodal) diversity gradient, with a plateau in the tropics, occurred during the last ice age...

Reconciling seascape genetics and fisheries science in three co-distributed flatfishes

Sara Vandamme, Joost Raeymaekers, Filip Volckaert, Gregory Maes, Karl Cottenie, Eveline Diopere & Federico Calboli
Uncertainty hampers innovative mixed-fisheries management by the scales at which connectivity dynamics are relevant to management objectives. The spatial scale of sustainable stock management is species-specific and depends on ecology, life history and population connectivity. One valuable approach to understand these spatial scales is to determine to what extent population genetic structure correlates with the oceanographic environment. Here we compare the level of genetic connectivity in three co-distributed and commercially exploited demersal flatfish species living...

Intraspecific genetic variation matters when predicting seagrass distribution under climate change

Zi-Min Hu, Quan-Sheng Zhang, Jie Zhang, Kass Jamie, Mammola Stefano, Fresia Pablo, Draisma Stefano, Assis Jorge, Jueterbock Alexander, Yokota Masashi & Zhixin Zhang
Seagrasses play a vital role in structuring coastal marine ecosystems, but their distributional range and genetic diversity have declined rapidly over the past decades. In order to improve conservation of seagrass species, it is important to predict how climate change may impact their ranges. Such predictions are typically made with correlative species distribution models (SDMs), which can estimate a species’ potential distribution under present and future climatic scenarios given species’ presence data and climatic predictor...

Animal-borne video systems provide insight into the reproductive behavior of the Asian black bear

Tomoko Naganuma, Mii Tanaka, Shiori Tezuka, Sam M.J.G. Steyaert, Kahoko Tochigi, Akino Inagaki, Hiroaki Myojo, Koji Yamazaki & Shinsuke Koike
Previous studies on the mating system of the Asian black bear (Ursus thibetanus) have been limited to observations of captive populations and estimations of multiple paternities. Hence, the mating system of wild bears remains poorly understood. Animal-borne camera systems (i.e., cameras mounted on animals) provide novel tools to study the behavior of elusive animals. Here, we used an animal-borne video system to record the activities of wild bears during the mating season. Video camera collars...

Data from: Genetics redraws pelagic biogeography of Calanus

Marvin Choquet, Maja Hatlebakk, Anusha K.S. Dhanasiri, Ksenia Kosobokova, Irina Smolina, Janne E. Søreide, Camilla Svensen, Webjørn Melle, Sławomir Kwaśniewski, Ketil Eiane, Malin Daase, Vigdis Tverberg, Stig Skreslet, Ann Bucklin & Galice Hoarau
Planktonic copepods of the genus Calanus play a central role in North Atlantic/Arctic marine food webs. Here, using molecular markers, we redrew the distributional ranges of Calanus species inhabiting the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and revealed much wider and more broadly overlapping distributions than previously described. The Arctic shelf species, C. glacialis, dominated the zooplankton assemblage of many Norwegian fjords, where only C. finmarchicus has been reported previously. In these fjords, high occurrences of...

Data from: No support for cryptic choice by ovarian fluid in an external fertilizer

Snøfrid April Kleppe, Jarle T. Nordeide, Geir Rudolfsen, Lars Figenschou, Berner Larsen, Katrin Reiss & Ivar Folstad
Whether the ovarian fluid represents a selective environment influencing cryptic female choice was tested using an external fertilizer experiencing intense sperm competition and large effects of ovarian fluid on sperm swimming behaviour - the Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). We physically separated the ovarian fluid from the eggs of reproductively active females and reintroduced either their own ovarian fluid or fluid from another female to the eggs. The eggs were then fertilized in vitro in a...

Data from: Phylogeographic diversification and postglacial range dynamics shed light on the conservation of the kelp Saccharina japonica

Jie Zhang, Jianting Yao, Zi-Min Hu, Alexander Jueterbock, Norishige Yotsukura, Tatiana N. Krupnova, Chikako Nagasato & Delin Duan
Studies of postglacial range shifts could enhance our understanding of seaweed species’ responses to climate change, and hence facilitate the conservation of natural resources. However, the distribution dynamics and phylogeographic diversification of the commercially and ecologically important kelp Saccharina japonica in the Northwest Pacific (NWP) are still poorly surveyed. In this study, we analyzed the evolutionary history of S. japonica using two mitochondrial markers and 24 nuclear microsatellites. A STRUCTURE analysis revealed two partially isolated...

The biogeography of community assembly: latitude and predation drive variation in community trait distribution in a guild of epifaunal crustaceans

Collin Gross, Collin Gross, J Duffy, Kevin Hovel, Melissa Kardish, Pamela Reynolds, Christoffer Boström, Katharyn Boyer, Mathiew Cusson, Johan Eklöf, Aschwin Engelen, Klemens Eriksson, Joel Fodrie, John Griffin, Clara Hereu, Masakazu Hori, A Randall Hughes, Mikhail Ivanov, Pablo Jorgensen, Claudia Kruschel, Kun-Seop Lee, Jonathan Lefcheck, Karen McGlathery, Per-Olav Moksnes, Masahiro Nakaoka … & Jay Stachowicz
While considerable evidence exists of biogeographic patterns in the intensity of species interactions, the influence of these patterns on variation in community structure is less clear. Using a model selection approach on measures of trait dispersion in crustaceans associated with eelgrass (Zostera marina) spanning 30º of latitude in two oceans, we found that dispersion strongly increased with increasing predation and decreasing latitude. Ocean and epiphyte load appeared as secondary predictors; Pacific communities were more overdispersed...

Data from: Host-parasite dynamics shaped by temperature and genotype: quantifying the role of underlying vital rates

Marjolein Bruijning, Erlend Fossen, Eelke Jongejans, Héléne Vanvelk, Joost Raeymaekers, Lynn Govaert, Kristien Brans, Sigurd Einum & Luc De Meester
1. Global warming challenges the persistence of local populations, not only through heat-induced stress, but also through indirect biotic changes. We study the interactive effects of temperature, competition and parasitism in the water flea Daphnia magna. 2. We carried out a common garden experiment monitoring the dynamics of Daphnia populations along a temperature gradient. Halfway through the experiment, all populations became infected with the ectoparasite Amoebidium parasiticum, enabling us to study interactive effects of temperature...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    3
  • 2021
    13
  • 2020
    7
  • 2019
    1
  • 2018
    3
  • 2017
    4
  • 2016
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    32

Affiliations

  • Nord University
    32
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    6
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    4
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    3
  • University Centre in Svalbard
    3
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Polish Academy of Sciences
    2
  • University of Connecticut
    2
  • Hokkaido University
    2