4 Works

Data from: Effects of increased flight on the energetics and life history of the butterfly Speyeria mormonia

Kristjan Niitepõld & Carol L. Boggs
Movement uses resources that may otherwise be allocated to somatic maintenance or reproduction. How does increased energy expenditure affect resource allocation? Using the butterfly Speyeria mormonia, we tested whether experimentally increased flight affects fecundity, lifespan or flight capacity. We measured body mass (storage), resting metabolic rate and lifespan (repair and maintenance), flight metabolic rate (flight capacity), egg number and composition (reproduction), and food intake across the adult lifespan. The flight treatment did not affect body...

Data from: Frost sensitivity of leaves and flowers of subalpine plants is related to tissue type and phenology

Paul J. CaraDonna & Justin A. Bain
Harsh abiotic conditions–such as low temperatures that lead to spring and summer frost events in high-elevation and high-latitude ecosystems–can have strong negative consequences for plant growth, survival, and reproduction. Despite the predicted increase in episodic frost events under continued climate change in some ecosystems, our general understanding of the factors associated with frost sensitivity of reproductive and vegetative plant structures in natural plant communities is limited. The timing of growth and reproduction may be an...

Data from: The effect of repeated, lethal sampling on wild bee abundance and diversity

Zachariah J. Gezon, Eli S. Wyman, John S. Ascher, David W. Inouye & Rebecca E. Irwin
1. Bee pollinators provide a critical ecosystem service to wild and agricultural plants but are reported to be declining world-wide due to anthropogenic change. Long-term data on bee abundance and diversity are scarce, and the need for additional quantitative sampling using repeatable methods has been emphasized. Recently, monitoring programmes have begun using a standardized method that employs a combination of pan traps and sweep netting, resulting in lethal sampling of bees. This standardized method can...

Data from: Quantifying direct vs. indirect effects of nectar robbers on male and female components of plant fitness

Rebecca E. Irwin, Paige Howell & Candace Galen
1. Plants interact simultaneously with both mutualists and antagonists. While webs of plant-animal interactions in natural systems can be highly complex, most interactions can be simplified into those that are either direct (mediated through pairwise interactions) or indirect (mediated through third-party species). Mechanistic studies of the direct and indirect pathways by which foliar herbivores affect plants have been well explored; however, mechanistic explorations of how floral herbivores, such as nectar robbers, affect total plant fitness...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory
    4
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of California, San Diego
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1
  • National University of Singapore
    1
  • University of South Carolina
    1
  • University of Missouri
    1
  • University of Arizona
    1
  • American Museum of Natural History
    1