6 Works

Data from: Quantifying heritable variation in fitness-related traits of wild, farmed and hybrid Atlantic salmon families in a wild river environment

Philip McGinnity, Thomas E. Reed, P. Prodohl, Rosaleen Hynes, Tom Cross & Andy Ferguson
Farmed fish are typically genetically different from wild conspecifics. Escapees from fish farms may contribute one-way gene flow from farm to wild gene pools, which can depress population productivity, dilute local adaptations and disrupt coadapted gene complexes. Here, we reanalyse data from two experiments (McGinnity et al., 1997, 2003) where performance of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) progeny originating from experimental crosses between farm and wild parents (in three different cohorts) were measured in a natural...

Data from: Effects of seal predation on a modelled marine fish community and consequences for a commercial fishery

Jennifer E. Houle, Francisco De Castro, Michelle A. Cronin, Keith D. Farnsworth, Martha Gosch & David G. Reid
We constructed a size- and trait-based dynamic marine community model of the Celtic Sea/Biologically Sensitive Area, including grey seals Halichoerus grypus (Fabricius 1791) and harbour seals Phoca vitulina vitulina (Linnaeus 1758) to examine potential resource conflict between seals and commercial trawl fisheries. The model incorporates seal diet preference, population size and commercial fishery catch, with survey data to quantify ecological interactions between seals and fisheries. Total annual consumption by seals was an order of magnitude...

Data from: Where the lake meets the sea: strong reproductive isolation is associated with adaptive divergence between lake resident and anadromous three-spined sticklebacks

Mark Ravinet, Rosaleen Hynes, Russell Poole, Tom F. Cross, Phil McGinnity, Harrod Harrod & Paulo A. Prodöhl
Contact zones between divergent forms of the same species are often characterised by high levels of phenotypic diversity over small geographic distances. What processes are involved in generating such high phenotypic diversity? One possibility is that introgression and recombination between divergent forms in contact zones results in greater phenotypic and genetic polymorphism. Alternatively, strong reproductive isolation between forms may maintain distinct phenotypes, preventing homogenisation by gene flow. Contact zones between divergent freshwater-resident and anadromous stickleback...

Data from: The signature of fine scale local adaptation in Atlantic salmon revealed from common garden experiments in nature

Ciar L O'Toole, Thomas E. Reed, Deborah Bailie, Caroline Bradley, Deirdre Cotter, Jamie Coughlan, Tom Cross, Eileen Dillane, Sarah McEvoy, Niall O'Maoileidigh, Paulo Prodöhl, Ger Rogan & Philip McGinnity
Understanding the extent, scale and genetic basis of local adaptation (LA) is important for conservation and management. Its relevance in salmonids at microgeographic scales, where dispersal (and hence potential gene flow) can be substantial, has however been questioned. Here, we compare the fitness of communally reared offspring of local and foreign Atlantic salmon Salmo salar from adjacent Irish rivers and reciprocal F1 hybrid crosses between them, in the wild ‘home’ environment of the local population....

Data from: Replicated analysis of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits in two wild great tit populations

Anna W. Santure, Jocelyn Poissant, Isabelle De Cauwer, Kees Van Oers, Matthew R. Robinson, John L. Quinn, Martien A. M. Groenen, Marcel E. Visser, Ben C. Sheldon & Jon Slate
Currently there is much debate on the genetic architecture of quantitative traits in wild populations. Is trait variation influenced by many genes of small effect or by a few genes of major effect? Where is additive genetic variation located in the genome? Do the same loci cause similar phenotypic variation in different populations? Great tits (Parus major) have been studied extensively in long-term studies across Europe, and consequently are considered an ecological 'model organism'. Recently,...

Data from: A genomewide catalogue of single nucleotide polymorphisms in white-beaked and Atlantic white-sided dolphins

Ruth Fernández, Mikkel Schubert, A. M. Vargas-Velázquez, Andrew Brownlow, Gisli A. Víkingsson, Ursula Siebert, Lasse Fast Jensen, Nils Øien, Dave Wall, Emer Rogan, Bjarni Mikkelsen, Willy Dabin, Gilles Guillot, Ludovic Orlando, A. H. Alfarhan, S. A. Alquraishi & K. A. S. Al-Rasheid
The field of population genetics is rapidly moving into population genomics as the quantity of data generated by high-throughput sequencing platforms increases. In this study, we used restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq) to recover genomewide genotypes from 70 white-beaked (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) and 43 Atlantic white-sided dolphins (L. acutus) gathered throughout their north-east Atlantic distribution range. Both species are at a high risk of being negatively affected by climate change. Here, we provide a resource of 38...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University College Cork
    6
  • Queen's University Belfast
    3
  • Marine Institute
    3
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • University of Veterinary Medicine Hanover
    1
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    1
  • Marine Research Institute
    1
  • King Saud University
    1
  • Queen's University
    1
  • University of Copenhagen
    1