7 Works

Data from: Local adaptation in transgenerational responses to predators

Matthew R. Walsh, Todd Castoe, Julian Holmes, Michelle Packer, Kelsey Biles, Melissa Walsh, Stephan B. Munch & David M. Post
Environmental signals can induce phenotypic changes that span multiple generations. Along with phenotypic responses that occur during development (i.e., ‘within-generation’ plasticity), such ‘transgenerational plasticity’ (TGP) has been documented in a diverse array of taxa spanning many environmental perturbations. New theory predicts that temporal stability is a key driver of the evolution of TGP. We tested this prediction using natural populations of zooplankton from lakes in Connecticut that span a large gradient in the temporal dynamics...

Data from: Influence of environmental parameters on movements and habitat utilization of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the Madagascar breeding ground

Laurène Trudelle, Salvatore Cerchio, Alexandre N. Zerbini, Ygor Geyer, Francois-Xavier Mayer, Jean-Luc Jung, Maxime R. Hervé, Stéphane Pous, Jean-Baptiste Sallée, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Olivier Adam & Jean-Benoit Charrassin
Assessing the movement patterns and key habitat features of breeding humpback whales is a prerequisite for the conservation management of this philopatric species. To investigate the interactions between humpback whale movements and environmental conditions off Madagascar, we deployed 25 satellite tags in the northeast and southwest coast of Madagascar. For each recorded position, we collated estimates of environmental variables and computed two behavioural metrics: behavioural state of ‘transiting’ (consistent/directional) versus ‘localized’ (variable/non-directional), and active swimming...

Data from: Genetic variation in blue whales in the eastern Pacific: implication for taxonomy and use of common wintering grounds

Richard G. LeDuc, F.I. Archer, Aimee R. Lang, Karen K. Martien, Brittany Hancock-Hanser, Juan P. Torres-Florez, Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Koen Van Waerebeek, Robert L. Brownell, Barbara L. Taylor & F. I. Archer
Many aspects of blue whale biology are poorly understood. Some of the gaps in our knowledge, such as those regarding their basic taxonomy and seasonal movements, directly affect our ability to monitor and manage blue whale populations. As a step towards filling in some of these gaps, microsatellite and mtDNA sequence analyses were conducted on blue whale samples from the Southern Hemisphere, the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP), and the northeast Pacific. The results indicate that...

Data from: Sex change and effective population size: implications for population genetic studies in marine fish

Ilaria Coscia, Julien Chopelet, Robin S. Waples, Bruce Mann & Stefano Mariani
Large variance in reproductive success is the primary factor that reduces effective population size (Ne) in natural populations. In sequentially hermaphroditic (sex-changing) fish, the sex ratio is typically skewed and biased towards the 'first' sex, while reproductive success increases considerably after sex change. Therefore, sex-changing fish populations are theoretically expected to have lower Ne than gonochorists (separate sexes), assuming all other parameters are essentially equal. In this study, we estimate Ne from genetic data collected...

Data from: Genome-wide SNP data suggests complex ancestry of sympatric North Pacific killer whale ecotypes

Andrew D. Foote & Phillip A. Morin
Three ecotypes of killer whale occur in partial sympatry in the North Pacific. Individuals assortatively mate within the same ecotype, resulting in correlated ecological and genetic differentiation. A key question is whether this pattern of evolutionary divergence is an example of incipient sympatric speciation from a single panmictic ancestral population, or whether sympatry could have resulted from multiple colonisations of the North Pacific and secondary contact between ecotypes. Here, we infer multilocus coalescent trees from...

Data from: Predator-driven brain size evolution in natural populations of Trinidadian killifish (Rivulus hartii)

Matthew R. Walsh, Whitnee Broyles, Shannon M. Beston & Stephan B. Munch
Vertebrates exhibit extensive variation in relative brain size. It has long been assumed that this variation is the product of ecologically driven natural selection. Yet, despite more than 100 years of research, the ecological conditions that select for changes in brain size are unclear. Recent laboratory selection experiments showed that selection for larger brains is associated with increased survival in risky environments. Such results lead to the prediction that increased predation should favour increased brain...

Data from: An integrated approach to historical population assessment of the great whales: case of the New Zealand southern right whale

Jennifer A. Jackson, Emma L. Carroll, Tim D. Smith, Alex N. Zerbini, Nathalie J. Patenaude & C. Scott Baker
Accurate estimation of historical abundance provides an essential baseline for judging the recovery of the great whales. This is particularly challenging for whales hunted prior to twentieth century modern whaling, as population-level catch records are often incomplete. Assessments of whale recovery using pre-modern exploitation indices are therefore rare, despite the intensive, global nature of nineteenth century whaling. Right whales (Eubalaena spp.) were particularly exploited: slow swimmers with strong fidelity to sheltered calving bays, the species...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • National Marine Fisheries Service
    7
  • The University of Texas at Arlington
    2
  • Wildlife Conservation Society
    2
  • Federal University of São Carlos
    1
  • New England Aquarium
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • British Antarctic Survey
    1
  • University of Salford
    1
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    1
  • University Austral de Chile
    1