11 Works

Great tits (Parus major) flexibly learn that herbivore-induced plant volatiles indicate prey location – an experimental evidence with two tree species

Katerina Sam, Eliska Kovarova, Inga Freiberga, Henriette Uthe, Alexander Weinhold, Leonardo Jorge & Rachakonda Sreekar
1. When searching for food, great tits (Parus major) can use herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) as an indicator of arthropod presence. Their ability to detect HIPVs was shown to be learned, and not innate, yet the flexibility and generalization of learning remains unclear. 2. We studied if, and if so how, naïve and trained great tits (Parus major) discriminate between herbivore-induced and non-induced saplings of Scotch elm (Ulmus glabra) and cattley guava (Psidium cattleyanum). We...

Koi sleepy disease as a pathophysiological and immunological consequence of a branchial infection of common carp with carp edema virus

Mikolaj Adamek, Felix Teitge, Ilka Baumann, Verena Jung-Schroers, Sahar Abd El Rahman, Richard Paley, Veronica Piackova, David Gela, Martin Kocour, Sebastian Rakers, Sven M. Bergmann, Martin Ganter & Dieter Steinhagen
Gills of fish are involved in respiration, excretion and osmoregulation. Due to numerous interactions between these processes, branchial diseases have serious implications on fish health. Here, “koi sleepy disease” (KSD), caused by carp edema virus (CEV) infection was used to study physiological, immunological and metabolic consequences of a gill disease in fish. A metabolome analysis shows that the moderately hypoxic-tolerant carp can compensate the respiratory compromise related to this infection by various adaptations in their...

The species richness-productivity relationship varies among regions and productivity estimates, but not with spatial resolution

Aleš Lisner, Gianluigi Ottaviani, Jitka Klimešová, Ondřej Mudrák, Jana Martínková & Jan Lepš
The relationship between species richness and productivity (SRPR) has been a long-studied and hotly debated topic in ecology. Different studies have reported different results with variable shapes (i.e. unimodal, linear) and directions (i.e. positive, negative) of SRPRs depending on spatial grain (i.e. size of sampling unit for species richness), productivity estimates, and study extent. In this study, we quantified the effect of multiple estimates of productivity (aboveground, belowground and total biomass, and various measures of...

Data from: Are belowground clonal traits good predictors of ecosystem functioning in temperate grasslands?

Jitka Klimesova, Ondrej Mudrak, Jana Martinkova, Ales Lisner, Jan Leps, Arinawa Filartiga & Gianluigi Ottaviani
Dataset contains data on biomass distribution, soil characteristics and trait data for 52 temperate grasslands. Data are presented at community level. Biomass distribution (aboveground biomass, rhizome biomass, and root biomass) and soil chemistry data are original. The trait data are from existing databases and are presented as averages for a community (not weighted by species abundance).

Data from: Spectroscopic approach to correction and visualisation of bright-field light transmission microscopy biological data

Ganna Platonova, Dalibor Štys, Pavel Souček, Kirill Lonhus, Jan Valenta & Renata Rychtáriková
The most realistic information about the transparent sample such as a live cell can be obtained only using bright-field light microscopy. At high-intensity pulsing LED illumination, we captured a primary 12-bit-per-channel (bpc) response from an observed sample using a bright-field wide-field microscope equipped with a high-resolution (4872x3248) image sensor. In order to suppress data distortions originating from the light interactions with undesirable elements in the optical path, poor sensor reproduction (geometrical defects of the camera...

Complex reticulate evolution of the speckled brush-furred rats (Lophuromys) in the Ethiopian centre of endemism

Valeria Komarova, Danila Kostin, Josef Bryja, Ondřej Mikula, Anna Bryjová, Dagmar Čížková, Radim Šumbera, Yonas Meheretu & Leonid Lavrenchenko
The Ethiopian highlands represent a remarkable biodiversity “hotspot” with a very high number of endemic species, even among vertebrates. Ethiopian representatives of a species complex of speckled brush-furred rats (Lophuromys flavopunctatus sensu lato) inhabit highland habitats ranging from low-elevation forests to Afroalpine grasslands. These may serve as a suitable model for understanding evolutionary processes leading to high genetic and ecological diversity in montane biodiversity hot-spots. Here, we analyze the most comprehensive genetic dataset of this...

Cercarial behaviour alters the consumer functional response of three-spined sticklebacks

Ana Born-Torrijos, Rachel Paterson, Gabrielle Van Beest, Tereza Vyhlídalová, Eirik Haugstvedt Henriksen, Rune Knudsen, Roar Kristoffersen, Per-Arne Amundsen & Miroslava Soldánová
1. Free-living parasite life stages may contribute substantially to ecosystem biomass and thus represent a significant source of energy flow when consumed by non-host organisms. However, ambient temperature and the predator’s own infection status may modulate consumption rates towards parasite prey. 2. We investigated the combined effects of temperature and predator infection status on the consumer functional response of three-spined sticklebacks towards the free-living cercariae stages of two common freshwater trematode parasites (Plagiorchis, Trichobilharzia). 3....

Disentangling the nonlinear effects of habitat complexity on functional responses

Julien Mocq, Pavel Soukup, Joacim Näslund & David Boukal
1. Structural complexity of habitats modifies trophic interactions by providing refuges and altering predator and prey behaviour. Nonlinear effects on trophic interaction strengths driven by these mechanisms may alter food web dynamics and community structure in response to habitat modifications. However, changes in functional response, the relationship between prey density and feeding rate, along habitat complexity (HC) gradients are little understood. 2. We quantified functional responses along a HC gradient from an entirely unstructured to...

Weak coordination between leaf drought tolerance and proxy traits in herbaceous plants

Maria Májeková, Tomáš Hájek, Agnes J. Albert, Francesco De Bello, Jiří Doležal, Lars Götzenberger, Stepan Janeček, Jan Lepš, Pierre Liancourt & Ondrej Mudrák
Increased drought is predicted to have a major impact on plant performance under environmental change. Yet leaf hydraulic traits directly related to drought tolerance, such as leaf turgor loss point (πtlp), are underrepresented in trait-based studies and have been largely overlooked within the main frameworks evaluating trait–trait coordination and trade-offs: the leaf economics spectrum and the global spectrum of plant form and function. Using 122 herbaceous species from the Central European temperate grasslands, we investigated...

Dataset for estimation of the biotic and climatic niche breadths and geographic range size of beech (Fagus) species worldwide

Qiong Cai, Erik Welk, Chengjun Ji, Wenjing Fang, Francesco Maria Sabatini, Jianxiao Zhu, Jiangling Zhu, Zhiyao Tang, Fabio Attorre, Juan Antonio Campos, Andraž Čarni, Milan Chytrý, Süleyman Çoban, Jürgen Dengler, Jiri Dolezal, Richard Field, József Pál Frink, Hamid Gholizadeh, Adrian Indreica, Ute Jandt, Dirk Nikolaus Karger, Jonathan Lenoir, Robert K. Peet, Remigiusz Pielech, Michele De Sanctis … & Helge Bruelheide
This dataset could be used to test whether the commonly observed positive range size–niche breadth relationship, as posited by the “niche breadth hypothesis”, exists for Fagus, one of the most dominant and widespread broad‐leaved deciduous tree genera in temperate forests of the Northern Hemisphere. There are many ways to estimate niche breadth. Here, we estimated biotic and climatic niche breadths per species using plot‐based co‐occurrence data and climate data, respectively. The range sizes of the...

Koi sleepy disease as a pathophysiological and immunological consequence of a branchial infection of common carp with carp edema virus

Mikolaj Adamek, Felix Teitge, Ilka Baumann, Verena Jung-Schroers, Sahar Abd El Rahman, Richard Paley, Veronica Piackova, David Gela, Martin Kocour, Sebastian Rakers, Sven M. Bergmann, Martin Ganter & Dieter Steinhagen
Gills of fish are involved in respiration, excretion and osmoregulation. Due to numerous interactions between these processes, branchial diseases have serious implications on fish health. Here, “koi sleepy disease” (KSD), caused by carp edema virus (CEV) infection was used to study physiological, immunological and metabolic consequences of a gill disease in fish. A metabolome analysis shows that the moderately hypoxic-tolerant carp can compensate the respiratory compromise related to this infection by various adaptations in their...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice
    11
  • Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
    6
  • University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation
    2
  • Charles University
    2
  • Czech Academy of Sciences
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • Yunnan University
    1
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    1
  • National Institute for Research and Development in Forestry "Marin Drăcea"
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1