72 Works

Eagles enter rotor-swept zones of wind turbines at rates that vary by turbine

Christopher McClure, Brian Rolek, Melissa Braham, Tricia Miller, Adam Duerr, Jennifer McCabe, Leah Dunn & Todd Katzner
There is increasing pressure on wind energy facilities to manage or mitigate for wildlife collisions. However, little information exists regarding spatial and temporal variation in collision rates, meaning that mitigation is most often a blanket prescription. To address this knowledge gap, we evaluated variation among turbines and months in an aspect of collision risk—probability of entry by an eagle into a rotor swept zone (hereafter, ‘probability of entry’). We examined 10,222 eagle flight paths identified...

Temperature‐associated decreases in demographic rates of Afrotropical bird species over 30 years

Montague H. C. Neate‐Clegg, Thomas R. Stanley, Çağan H. Şekercioğlu & William D. Newmark
Tropical mountains harbor globally significant levels of biodiversity and endemism. Climate change threatens many tropical montane species, yet little research has assessed the effects of climate change on the demographic rates of tropical species, particularly in the Afrotropics. Here, we report on the demographic rates of 21 Afrotropical bird species over 30 years in montane forests in Tanzania. We used mark-recapture analyses to model rates of population growth, recruitment, and apparent survival as functions of...

Growth model used in Guzy et al. Increased growth rates of stream salamanders following forest harvesting

Jacquelyn Guzy, Brian Halstead, Kelly Halloran, Jessica Homyack & John D. Willson
Timber harvesting can influence headwater streams by altering stream productivity, with cascading effects on the food web and predators within, including stream salamanders. Although studies have examined shifts in occupancy or abundance following timber harvest, few examine sublethal effects such as changes in growth and demography. To examine the effect of upland harvesting on growth of the stream-associated Ouachita dusky salamander (Desmognathus brimleyorum), we used capture-mark-recapture over three years at three headwater streams embedded in...

Combined influence of intrinsic and environmental factors in shaping productivity in a small pelagic gull, the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla

Aly McKnight, David Irons, Cynthia Loftin, Shawn McKinney & Brian Olsen
While we have a good understanding in many systems of the effects of single variable changes on organisms, we understand far less about how variables act in concert to affect living systems, where interactions among variables can lead to unanticipated results. We used mixed-effect models to evaluate the effects of multiple variables that we expected to play a role in the early reproductive stages of a North Pacific seabird, the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla, during...

Pairing functional connectivity with population dynamics to prioritize corridors for Southern California spotted owls

Erin Conlisk, Emily Haeuser, Alan Flint, Rebecca Lewison & Megan Jennings
Aim: Land use change, climate change, and shifts to disturbance regimes make successful wildlife management challenging, particularly when ongoing urbanization constrains habitat and movement. Preserving and maintaining landscape connectivity is a potential strategy to support wildlife responding to these stressors. Using a novel model framework, we determined the population-level benefit of a set of identified potential corridors for spotted owl population viability. Location: Southern California, United States. Methods: Combining habitat suitability and dynamic metapopulation models,...

Data from: Drivers of site fidelity in ungulates

Thomas Morrison, Jerod Merkel, J. Grant Hopcraft, Ellen Aikens, Jeffrey Beck, Randall Boone, Alyson Courtemanch, Samantha Dwinnell, Sue Fairbanks, Brad Griffith, Arthur Middleton, Kevin Monteith, Brendan Oates, Louise Riotte-Lambert, Hall Sawyer, Kurt Smith, Jared Stabach, Kaitlyn Taylor & Matthew Kauffman
While the tendency to return to previously visited locations – termed ‘site fidelity’ – is common in animals, the cause of this behaviour is not well understood. One hypothesis is that site fidelity is shaped by an animal’s environment, such that animals living in landscapes with predictable resources have stronger site fidelity. Site fidelity may also be conditional on the success of animals’ recent visits to that location, and it may become stronger with age...

Data from: Intraspecific variation in incubation behaviors along a latitudinal gradient is driven by nest microclimate and selection on neonate quality

Carl Lundblad & Courtney Conway
The strategies by which animals allocate reproductive effort across their lifetimes vary, and the causes of variation in those strategies are actively debated. In birds, most research has focused heavily on variation in clutch size and fecundity, but incubation behavior and other functionally related traits have received less attention. Variation in incubation period duration is notable because time-dependent sources of clutch mortality should impose strong directional selection to minimize the incubation period. However, life-history theory...

Forecasting NDVI in the Galapagos

Noah Charney, Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau, Charles Yackulic, Stephen Blake & James Gibbs
Forecasting ecosystem response to climate change is critical for guiding policy-making but challenging due to: complicated relationships between microclimates and regional climates; species’ responses that are driven by extremes rather than averages; the multifaceted nature of species’ interactions; and the lack of historical analogs to future climates. Given these challenges, even model systems such as the Galapagos Islands, a world-famous biodiversity hotspot and World Heritage Site, lack clear forecasts for future environmental change. Here, we...

Invasion and Global Change Meta-analysis Data

Bianca E. Lopez, Jenica M. Allen, Jeffrey S. Dukes, Jonathan Lenoir, Montserat Vila, Dana M. Blumenthal, Evelyn M. Beaury, Emily J. Fusco, Toni Lyn Morelli, Cascade J. B. Sorte & Bethany A. Bradley
We conducted a global meta-analysis to investigate invasions, abiotic global environmental changes, and their combined effects on native species, communities, and ecosystems.We searched the Web of Science Core Collection for articles and reviews that were available in English through September 30, 2020. Search terms were chosen to identify papers reporting impacts of invasions with one of six abiotic global environmental changes (GECs: warming, nitrogen deposition, O2 depletion, drought, CO2 addition, and altered pH). We assessed...

Loss of branches due to winter storms could favor deciduousness in oaks

Richard Karban & Ian Pearse
Premise of the study. Ecologists have an incomplete understanding of the factors that select for deciduous, evergreen, and marcescent leaf habits. Evergreens have more opportunities for photosynthesis but may experience costs when abiotic conditions are unfavorable such as during ice and windstorms. Methods. We documented branch loss for species of oaks (Quercus spp) in a common garden in California during an unusual windstorm. Key Results. Branches of marcescent trees were more likely to break during...

Geographic variation in dispersal of western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) populations

Alberto Macías-Duarte & Courtney J. Conway
Dispersal is one of the key elements of species’ metapopulation dynamics and, hence, influences global conservation status. Furthermore, determining the geographic variation in magnitude and direction of dispersal throughout a species’ distribution may expand our understanding of the causes of population declines in species of conservation concern. For instance, western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) populations have declined at the northern and eastern edge of their breeding distribution during the 20th century. In the same...

Data for: Long-term surveys support declines in early-season forest plants used by bumble bees

John Mola, Leif Richardson, Greg Spyreas, David Zaya & Ian Pearse
Populations of bumble bees and other pollinators have declined over the past several decades due to numerous threats, including habitat loss and degradation. However, we can rarely investigate the role of resource loss due to a lack of detailed long-term records of forage plants and habitats. We use 22-year repeated surveys of more than 262 sites located in grassland, forest, and wetland habitats across Illinois, USA to explore how the abundance and richness of bumble...

Global resorption efficiencies of trace elements in leaves of terrestrial plants

Hao Chen, Sasha Reed, Xiao-Tao Lü, Kongcao Xiao, Kelin Wang & Dejun Li
1. Leaf nutrient resorption is a critical nutrient conservation strategy. Previous studies focus mainly on resorption patterns of macronutrients, but resorption patterns of trace elements remain poorly understood. 2. A meta-analysis was conducted to explore the general patterns of the leaf resorption of eight trace elements [i.e., copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), boron (B), manganese (Mn), sodium (Na), aluminum (Al), and iron (Fe)], and a macronutrient [i.e., sulfur (S)] using data collected from 53...

Behavioral patterns of bats at a wind turbine events

Shifra Goldenberg, Paul Cryan, P. Marcos Gorresen & Lee Jay Fingersh
Bat fatalities at wind energy facilities in North America are predominantly comprised of migratory, tree-dependent species, but it is unclear why these bats are at higher risk. Factors influencing bat susceptibility to wind turbines might be revealed by temporal patterns in their behaviors around these dynamic landscape structures. In northern temperate zones fatalities occur mostly from July through October, but whether this reflects seasonally variable behaviors, passage of migrants, or some combination of factors remains...

Lake food webs: Species invasion progressively disrupts the trophic structure of native food webs

Charles Wainright, Clint Muhlfeld, James Elser, Samuel Bourret & Shawn Devlin
Species invasions can have substantial impacts on native species and ecosystems, with important consequences for biodiversity. How these disturbances drive changes in the trophic structure of native food webs through time is poorly understood. Here, we quantify trophic disruption in freshwater food webs to invasion by an apex fish predator, lake trout, using an extensive stable isotope dataset across a natural gradient of uninvaded and invaded lakes in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. Lake trout...

Local fruit availability and en route wind conditions are poor predictors of bird abundance and composition during fall migration in coastal Yucatán Peninsula

Richard Feldman, Antonio Celis Murillo, Jill Deppe & Alfredo Dorantes Euan
In migratory stopover habitats, bird abundance and composition change on a near daily basis. On any given day, the local bird community should reflect local environmental conditions but also the environments that birds encountered previously along their migratory route. For example, during fall migration, the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico receives birds that have just crossed the Gulf of Mexico and their abundance and composition may be associated with regional factors such as...

Data from: Hybridization alters growth and migratory life history expression of native trout

Jeffrey T. Strait, Lisa A. Eby, Ryan P. Kovach, Clint C. Muhlfeld, Matthew C. Boyer, Stephen J. Amish, Seth Smith, Winsor H. Lowe & Gordon Luikart
Human-mediated hybridization threatens many native species, but the effects of introgressive hybridization on life history expression are rarely quantified, especially in vertebrates. We quantified the effects of non-native rainbow trout admixture on important life history traits including growth and partial migration behavior in three populations of westslope cutthroat trout over five years. Rainbow trout admixture was associated with increased summer growth rates in all populations, and decreased spring growth rates in two populations with cooler...

Species mixture effects and climate influence growth, recruitment and mortality in Interior West U.S.A. Populus tremuloides - conifer communities

Christopher Looney, Wilfred Previant, John Bradford & Linda Nagel
Tree-species mixture effects (e.g., complementarity and facilitation) have been found to increase individual-tree productivity, lessen mortality, and improve recruitment in forests worldwide. By promoting more efficient and complete resource use, mixture effects may also lessen individual-tree-level water stress, thus improving drought-resistance. We investigated the influence of mixture effects on tree productivity, mortality, and recruitment across broad compositional and moisture gradients in high-elevation Interior West US mixed-conifer communities, where Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen) is the major...

Vegetation characteristics and precipitation jointly influence grassland bird abundance beyond the effects of grazing management

Kristin Davis, David Augustine, Adrian Monroe & Cameron Aldridge
Grassland birds have experienced some of the steepest population declines of any guild of birds in North America. The shortgrass steppe contains some of North America’s most-intact grasslands, which makes the region particularly important for these species. Grassland birds differentially respond to variation in vegetation structure generated by spatiotemporally-varying disturbance like grazing management. However, understanding how species respond to characteristics beyond vegetation structure or grazing could better inform management for these species in the shortgrass...

Short-term responses to a human-altered landscape do not affect fat dynamics of a migratory ungulate

Samantha Dwinnell, Hall Sawyer, , Jill Randall, Rusty Kaiser, Mark Thonhoff, Gary Fralick & Kevin Monteith
According to risk-sensitive foraging theory, animals should make foraging decisions that balance nutritional costs and gains to promote fitness. Human disturbance is a form of perceived risk that can prompt avoidance of risky habitat over the acquisition of food. Consequently, behavioral responses to perceived risk could induce nutritional costs. Population declines often coincide with increases in human disturbance, which likely is associated with direct and indirect habitat loss. Nevertheless, behavioral and physiological responses to perceived...

Do fine-scale experiments underestimate predator consumption rates?

Lindsey Bruckerhoff, Casey Pennock & Keith Gido
Understanding ecological processes across spatial scales helps link observations and predictions from experiments to ecological patterns occurring at coarser scales relevant to management and conservation. Using fish, we experimentally manipulated the size of arenas to test the spatial scaling of predator-prey interactions. We measured variation in predator consumption and prey behavior (prey aggregation, spatial overlap with predators, and movement) across arena sizes. Variation in prey behavior across arena sizes was hypothesized to drive consumption patterns...

Functional traits reveal the dominant drivers of long‐term community change across a North American Great Lake

James Sinclair, Michael Fraker, James Hood, Kenneth Frank, Mark DuFour, Ann Marie Gorman & Stuart Ludsin
The datasets here were used to determine annual sentinel fish species and trait composition in Lake Erie's western and central basins during 1969-2018 in relation to multiple anthropogenic stressors. Here, we provide three datasets, which are used in the paper by Sinclair et al. titled: "Functional traits reveal the dominant drivers of long-term community change across a North American Great Lake". Each dataset is provided as a separate tab in a single Excel worksheet. The...

Functional connectivity in a continuously distributed, migratory species as revealed by landscape genomics

Melanie E. F. LaCava, Roderick B. Gagne, Kyle D. Gustafson, Sara J. Oyler-McCance, Kevin L. Monteith, Hall Sawyer, Matthew J. Kauffman, Daniel J. Thiele & Holly B. Ernest
Maintaining functional connectivity is critical for the long-term conservation of wildlife populations. Landscape genomics provides an opportunity to assess long-term functional connectivity by relating environmental variables to spatial patterns of genomic variation resulting from generations of movement, dispersal, and mating behaviors. Identifying landscape features associated with gene flow at large geographic scales for highly mobile species is becoming increasingly possible due to more accessible genomic approaches, improved analytical methods, and enhanced computational power. We characterized...

Disease or drought: Environmental fluctuations release zebra from a potential pathogen-triggered ecological trap

Yen-Hua Huang, Hendrina Joel, Martina Küsters, Zoe Barandongo, Claudine Cloete, Axel Hartmann, Pauline Kamath, Werner Kilian, John Mfune, Gabriel Shatumbu, Royi Zidon, Wayne Getz & Wendy Turner
When a transmission hotspot for an environmentally persistent pathogen establishes in otherwise high-quality habitat, the disease may exert a strong impact on a host population. However, fluctuating environmental conditions lead to heterogeneity in habitat quality and animal habitat preference, which may interrupt the overlap between selected and risky habitats. We evaluated spatiotemporal patterns in anthrax mortalities in a plains zebra (Equus quagga) population in Etosha National Park, Namibia, incorporating remote-sensing and host telemetry data. A...

Causes of delayed outbreak responses and their impacts on epidemic spread

Yun Tao, Matthew Ferrari, Katriona Shea, William Probeert, Michael Runge, Kevin Lafferty & Michael Tildesley
Livestock diseases have devastating consequences economically, socially, and politically across the globe. In certain systems, pathogens remain viable after host death, which enables residual transmissions from infected carcasses. Rapid culling and carcass disposal are well-established strategies for stamping out an outbreak and limiting its impact, however, wait-times for these procedures, i.e., response delays, are typically farm-specific and time-varying due to logistical constraints. Failing to incorporate variable response delays in epidemiological models may understate outbreak projections...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    72

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    72

Affiliations

  • United States Geological Survey
    72
  • Colorado State University
    7
  • University of California, Berkeley
    4
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    4
  • Utah State University
    3
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    3
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • University of Wyoming
    3
  • University of Maine
    3
  • Durham University
    3