71 Works

Experimental evidence for the recovery of mercury-contaminated fish populations

Lee Hrenchuk, Paul Blanchfield, John Rudd, Marc Amyot, Christopher Babiarz, Ken Beaty, Drew Bodaly, Brian Branfireun, Cynthia Gilmour, Jennifer Graydon, Britt Hall, Reed Harris, Andrew Heyes, Holger Hintelmann, James Hurley, Carol Kelly, David Krabbenhoft, Steve Lindberg, Robert Mason, Michael Paterson, Cheryl Podemski, Ken Sandilands, George Southworth, Vincent St. Louis, Lori Tate … & Michael Tate
Anthropogenic releases of mercury (Hg) are a human health issue because the potent toxicant methylmercury (MeHg), formed primarily by microbial methylation of inorganic Hg in aquatic ecosystems, bioaccumulates to high concentrations in fish consumed by humans. Predicting the efficacy of Hg pollution controls on fish MeHg concentrations is complex because many factors influence the production and bioaccumulation of MeHg. Here we conducted a 15-year whole-ecosystem, single-factor experiment to determine the magnitude and timing of reductions...

Supplementary information for Paleoceanographic changes in the late Pliocene promoted rapid diversification in pelagic seabirds

Joan Ferrer Obiol, Helen F. James, R. Terry Chesser, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís, Julio Rozas, Andreanna J. Welch & Marta Riutort
Aim: Paleoceanographic changes can act as drivers of diversification and speciation, even in highly mobile marine organisms. Shearwaters are a group of globally distributed and highly mobile pelagic seabirds. Despite a recent well resolved phylogeny, shearwaters have controversial species limits, and show periods of both slow and rapid diversification. Here, we explore the role of paleoceanographic changes on the diversification and speciation in these highly mobile pelagic seabirds. We investigate shearwater biogeography and the evolution...

Data for impact of “non-lethal” tarsal clipping on bumble bees (Bombus vosnesenskii) may depend on queen stage and worker size

John Mola, Clara Stuligross, Maureen Page, Danielle Rutkowski & Neal Williams
Recent bumble bee declines have prompted the development of novel population monitoring tools, including the use of putatively non-lethal tarsal clipping to obtain genetic material. However, the potential side effects of tarsal clipping have only been tested in the worker caste of a single domesticated species, prompting the need to more broadly test whether tarsal clipping negatively affects sampled individuals. To determine if tarsal clipping reduces queen survivorship and colony establishment, we collected wild queens...

Data from: Biocrusts do not differentially influence emergence and early establishment of native and non-native grasses

Cheryl McIntyre, Steven R. Archer, Katharine I. Predick & Jayne Belnap
Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) cover the soil surface of global drylands and interact with vascular plants. Biocrusts may influence the availability and nature of safe sites for plant recruitment and the susceptibility of an area to invasion by non-native species. Therefore, to investigate the potential role of biocrusts in invasive species management, we sought to determine if native and non-native grass recruitment in two North American deserts were differentially affected by biocrusts. We conducted a...

Microcoleus (Cyanobacteria) form watershed-wide populations without strong gradients in population structure

Keith Bouma-Gregson, Alex Crits-Christoph, Matthew Olm, Mary Power & Jillian Banfield
The relative importance of separation by distance and by environment to population genetic diversity can be conveniently tested in river networks, where these two drivers are often independently distributed over space. To evaluate the importance of dispersal and environmental conditions in shaping microbial population structures, we performed genome-resolved metagenomic analyses of benthic Microcoleus-dominated cyanobacterial mats collected in the Eel and Russian River networks (California, USA). The 64 Microcoleus genomes were clustered into three species that...

Data from: Seasonal variation in resource selection by subadult golden eagles in the Great Basin Desert

Robert Lonsinger, Kathy Hixson, Steven Slater & Robert Knight
Golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) are a long-lived and wide-ranging species believed to be stable or in slight decline across North America. Golden eagles have an extended subadult stage (4–5 years) that is critical to maintaining recruitment into the breeding population and population viability. We investigated patterns of resource selection for subadults in the Great Basin Desert of the western United States during summer and winter, 2013–2019. We monitored 46 subadults with GPS transmitters and related...

Data from: MetaBARFcoding: DNA-barcoding of regurgitated prey yields insights into Christmas Shearwater (Puffinus nativitatis) foraging ecology at Hōlanikū (Kure Atoll), Hawaiʻi

Matthew Iacchei, Ilana Nimz, Mark Renshaw, John Baczenas, Cynthia Vanderlip & Karl David Hyrenbach
Morphological identification of digested prey remains from a generalist predator can be challenging, especially when attempting to match degraded remains to taxonomic keys. DNA techniques, whereby prey is sequenced and matched to large public nucleotide sequence databases, are increasingly being used to augment morphological identification. We used “metaBARFcoding” (DNA metabarcoding) to target a region of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I mitochondrial gene to identify prey in highly-digested regurgitations from Christmas Shearwaters Puffinus nativitatis at...

Integrating ecosystem metabolism and consumer allochthony reveals nonlinear drivers in lake organic matter processing

Meredith Holgerson, Rachel Hovel, Patrick Kelly, Lauren Bortolotti, Jennifer Brentrup, Amber Bellamy, Samantha Oliver & Alexander Reisinger
Lakes process both terrestrial and aquatic organic matter, and the relative contribution from each source is often measured via ecosystem metabolism and terrestrial resource use in the food web (i.e., consumer allochthony). Yet, ecosystem metabolism and consumer allochthony are rarely considered together, despite possible interactions and potential for them to respond to the same lake characteristics. In this study, we compiled global datasets of lake gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER), and zooplankton allochthony...

Consequences of migratory coupling of predators and prey when mediated by human actions

Navinder Singh, Frauke Ecke, Todd Katzner, Sumanta Bagchi, Per Sandstöm & Birger Hörnfeldt
Aim: Animal migrations influence ecosystem structure, dynamics, and persistence of predator and prey populations. The theory of migratory coupling postulates that aggregations of migrant prey can induce large-scale synchronized movements in predators, and this coupling is consequential for the dynamics of ecological communities. The degree to which humans influence these interactions remains largely unknown. We tested whether the creation of large resource pulses by humans such as seasonal herding of reindeer Rangifer tarandus and hunting...

Threading the needle: how humans influence predator-prey spatiotemporal interactions in a multiple-predator system

Asia Murphy, Duane Diefenbach, Mark Ternent, Matt Lovallo & David Miller
Perceived predation risk and the resulting antipredator behavior varies across space, time, and predator identity. Communities with multiple predators that interact and differ in their use of space, time of activity, and hunting mode create a complex landscape for prey to avoid predation. Anthropogenic presence and disturbance have the potential to shift interactions among predators and prey and the where and when encounters occur. We examined how spatiotemporal antipredator behavior of white-tailed deer fawns (Odocoileus...

Biodiversity-productivity relationships in a natural grassland community vary under diversity loss scenarios

Qingmin Pan, Amy Symstad, Yongfei Bai, Jianhui Huang, Jianguo Wu, Shahid Naeem, Dima Chen, Dashuan Tian, Qibing Wang & Xingguo Han
Understanding the biodiversity-productivity relationship and underlying mechanisms in natural ecosystems under realistic diversity loss scenarios remains a major challenge for ecologists despite its importance for predicting impacts of rapid loss of biodiversity worldwide. Here we report the results of a plant functional group (PFG) removal experiment conducted on the Mongolian Plateau, the largest remaining natural grassland in the world. Our results demonstrated that the biodiversity-productivity relationship varied among positive linear, neutral, and unimodal forms under...

Resource selection functions based on hierarchical generalized additive models provide new insights into individual animal variation and species distributions

Jennifer McCabe, John Clare, Tricia Miller, Todd Katzner, Jeff Cooper, Scott Somershoe, David Hanni, Christine Kelly, Robert Sargent, Eric Soehren, Carrie Threadgill, Mercedes Maddox, Jonathan Stober, Mark Martell, Thomas Salo, Andrew Berry, Michael Lanzone, Melissa Braham & Christopher McClure
Habitat selection studies are designed to generate predictions of species distributions or inference regarding general habitat associations and individual variation in habitat use. Such studies frequently involve either individually indexed locations gathered across limited spatial extents and analyzed using resource selection functions (RSF), or spatially extensive locational data without individual resolution typically analyzed using species distribution models. Both analytical methodologies have certain desirable features, but analyses that combine individual- and population-level inference with flexible non-linear...

Shrub influence on soil carbon and nitrogen in a semi-arid grassland is mediated by precipitation and largely insensitive to livestock grazing

Heather Throop, Seth Munson, Nicole Hornslein & Mitchel McClaran
Dryland (arid and semi-arid) ecosystems globally provide more than half of livestock production and store roughly one-third of soil organic carbon (SOC). Biogeochemical pools are changing due toshrub encroachment, livestock grazing, and climate change. We assessed how vegetation microsite, grazing, and precipitation interacted to affect SOC and total nitrogen (TN) at a site with long-term grazing manipulations and well-described patterns of shrub encroachment across elevation and mean annual precipitation (MAP) gradients. We analyzed SOC and...

Supplementary information for integrating sequence capture and restriction-site associated DNA sequencing to resolve recent radiations of Pelagic seabirds

Joan Ferrer-Obiol, Helen F. James, R. Terry Chesser, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís, Julio Rozas, Marta Riutort & Andreanna J. Welch
The diversification of modern birds has been shaped by a number of radiations. Rapid diversification events make reconstructing the evolutionary relationships among taxa challenging due to the convoluted effects of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and introgression. Phylogenomic datasets have the potential to detect patterns of phylogenetic incongruence, and to address their causes. However, the footprints of ILS and introgression on sequence data can vary between different phylogenomic markers at different phylogenetic scales depending on factors...

Data for behavioral state-dependent habitat selection analysis of translocated female greater sage-grouse, North Dakota 2018-2020

Simona Picardi, Peter Coates, Jesse Kolar, Shawn O'Neil, Steven Mathews & David Dahlgren
This dataset is associated with the article, "Behavioral state-dependent habitat selection and implications for animal translocations" (Picardi et al., 2021, Journal of Applied Ecology). Post-release monitoring of translocated animals can be used to inform future translocation protocols. In particular, quantifying habitat selection of translocated individuals may help identify features that characterize suitable settlement habitat and inform the choice of future release sites; however, because translocated animals undergo post-release behavioral modification, the underlying behavioral state needs...

Demographic responses to climate change in a threatened Arctic species

Kylee D. Dunham, Anna M. Tucker, David N. Koons, Asheber Abebe, F. Stephen Dobson & James B. Grand
The Arctic is undergoing rapid and accelerating change in response to global warming, altering biodiversity patterns and ecosystem function across the region. For Arctic endemic species, our understanding of the consequences of such change remains limited. Spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri), a large Arctic sea duck, use remote regions in the Bering Sea, Arctic Russia, and Alaska throughout the annual cycle making it difficult to conduct comprehensive surveys or demographic studies. Listed as Threatened under the...

Widespread Ranavirus and Perkinsea infections in Cuban Treefrogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis) invading New Orleans, USA

Anna Savage, Net Galt, Matthew Atkinson, Brad Glorioso, Hardin Waddle & Melanie Litton
Invasive species can negatively impact ecosystems in numerous ways, including vectoring pathogenic organisms. In amphibians, a lineage globally threatened by multiple pathogens, this spread of disease via invasive species could contribute to declines in native populations. The Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) is invasive in the southeastern USA. To assess whether O. septentrionalis is a potential reservoir host for the pathogens Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), Ranavirus (Rv), and Perkinsea (Pr), we sampled 82 individuals from a recently...

Across borders: external factors and prior behavior influence North Pacific albatross associations with fishing vessels

Rachael Orben, Josh Adams, Michelle Hester, Scott Shaffer, Robert Suryan, Tomohiro Deguchi, Kiyoaki Ozaki, Fumio Sato, Lindsay Young, Corey Clatterbuck, Melinda Conners, David Kroodsma & Leigh Torres
1. Understanding encounters between marine predators and fisheries across national borders and outside national jurisdictions offers new perspectives on unwanted interactions to inform ocean management and predator conservation. Although seabird-fisheries overlap has been documented at many scales, remote identification of vessel encounters has lagged because vessel movement data often is lacking. 2. Here, we reveal albatross-fisheries associations throughout the North Pacific Ocean. We identified commercial fishing operations using Global Fishing Watch data and algorithms to...

Dietary composition and fatty acid content of giant salmonflies (Pteronarcys californica) in two Rocky Mountain rivers

Michelle Briggs, Lindsey Albertson, Zach Maguire, Sophia Swart, Wyatt Cross, Cornelia Twining, Jeff Wesner, Colden Baxter & David Walters
Many aquatic invertebrates are declining or facing extinction from stressors that compromise physiology, resource consumption, reproduction, and phenology. However, the influence of these common stressors specifically on consumer-resource interactions for aquatic invertebrate consumers is only beginning to be understood. We conducted a field study to investigate Pteronarcys californica (i.e., the ‘giant salmonfly’), a large-bodied insect that is ecologically and culturally significant to rivers throughout the western U.S. We sampled gut contents and polyunsaturated fatty acid...

Genetic variation in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from the North Pacific with relevance to the threatened Southwest Alaska distinct population segment

Blair Flannery, Ora Russ, Michelle St. Martin, William Beatty, Kristin Worman, Joel Garlich-Miller, Varena Gill, Patrick Lemons, Daniel Monson, Kimberly Kloecker, Daniel Esler & John Wenburg
For the sea otter (Enhydra lutris), genetic population structure is an area of research that has not received significant attention, especially in Southwest Alaska where that distinct population segment has been listed as threatened since 2005 pursuant to the U.S. Endangered Species Act. In this study, 501 samples from 14 locations from Prince William Sound, Alaska to the Commander Islands in Russia were analyzed for variation at 13 microsatellite loci. Our results indicate a high...

Habitat diversity influences puma (Puma concolor) diet in the Chihuahuan Desert

James Cain & Charles Prude
Habitat heterogeneity and corresponding diversity in potential prey species should increase the diet breadth of generalist predators. Many previous studies describing puma Puma concolor diets in the arid regions of the southwestern United States were focused within largely xeric locations, overlooking the influence of heterogeneity created by riparian forests. Such habitat heterogeneity and corresponding prey diversity could influence prey availability and puma diet composition. We examined seasonal prey composition of pumas occupying areas with different...

Data from: Intraspecific variation mediates density dependence in a genetically diverse plant species

Andrii Zaiats, Matthew J. Germino, Marcelo D. Serpe, Bryce A. Richardson & Trevor Caughlin
Interactions between neighboring plants are critical for biodiversity maintenance in plant populations and communities. Intraspecific trait variation and genome duplication are common in plant species and can drive eco-evolutionary dynamics through genotype-mediated plant-plant interactions. However, few studies have examined how species-wide intraspecific variation may alter interactions between neighboring plants. We investigate how subspecies and ploidy variation in a genetically diverse species, big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), can alter the demographic outcomes of plant interactions. Using a...

Plasma metabolite indices are robust to extrinsic variation and useful indicators of foraging habitat quality in Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis)

Eric Smith, Michael Anteau, Heath Hagy & Christopher Jacques
This dataset contains plasma lipid metabolite values collected from Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) during spring migration (March 2016 and 2017) as described in the paper "Smith, E.J., M.J. Anteau, H. M. Hagy and C.N. Jacques (2021). Plasma metabolite indices are robust to extrinsic variation and useful indicators of foraging habitat quality in Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis). Ornithology. In press." The experiment investigates the use of plasma metabolites beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) and triglyceride (TRIG) as predictors of...

Relationships of climate, human activity, and fire history to spatiotemporal variation in annual fire probability across California: Source Code and Core Data

Isaac Park, Michael Mann, Lorraine Flint, Alan Flint & Max Moritz
In the face of recent wildfires across the Western United States, it is essential that we understand both the dynamics that drive the spatial distribution of wildfire, and the major obstacles to modeling the probability of wildfire over space and time. However, it is well documented that the precise relationships of local vegetation, climate, and ignitions, and how they influence fire dynamics, may vary over space and among local climate, vegetation, and land use regimes....

Collins Pine and FIA Comparison

Alexis Bernal, Brandon Collins & Jens Stevens
The overwhelming majority of information on historical forest conditions in the western North America comes from public lands, which may provide an incomplete description of historical landscapes. Historical data from privately-owned lands could help inform large-scale forest restoration efforts across ownerships. In this study we made use of an archive containing extensive timber survey data collected in the early 1920’s from privately owned forestland. We then used contemporary FIA data to compare changes in tree...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    71

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    71

Affiliations

  • United States Geological Survey
    71
  • Colorado State University
    7
  • University of California, Berkeley
    4
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    4
  • Utah State University
    3
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    3
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • University of Wyoming
    3
  • University of Maine
    3
  • Durham University
    3