343 Works

Data from: Ranking and characterization of established BMI and lipid associated loci as candidates for gene-environment interactions

Dmitry Shungin, Wei Q. Deng, Tibor V. Varga, Jian'an Luan, Evelin Mihailov, Andres Metspalu, Andrew P. Morris, Nita G. Forouhi, Cecilia Lindgren, Patrik K. E. Magnusson, Nancy L. Pedersen, Göran Hallmans, Audrey Y. Chu, Anne E. Justice, Mariaelisa Graff, Thomas W. Winkler, Lynda M. Rose, Claudia Langenberg, L. Adrienne Cupples, Paul M. Ridker, Nicholas J. Wareham, Ken K. Ong, Ruth J. F. Loos, Daniel I. Chasman, Erik Ingelsson … & Paul W. Franks
Phenotypic variance heterogeneity across genotypes at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may reflect underlying gene-environment (G·E) or gene-gene interactions. We modeled variance heterogeneity for blood lipids and BMI in up to 44,211 participants and investigated relationships between variance effects (Pv), G·E interaction effects (with smoking and physical activity), and marginal genetic effects (Pm). Correlations between Pv and Pm were stronger for SNPs with established marginal effects (Spearman's ρ=0.401 for triglycerides, and ρ=0.236 for BMI) compared...

Data from: Genetic consequences of population expansions and contractions in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) since the Late Pleistocene

Céline Stoffel, Christophe Dufresnes, John B. A. Okello, Christian Noirard, Pierre Joly, Silvester Nyakaana, Vincent B. Muwanika, Nicolas Alcala, Séverine Vuilleumier, Hans R. Siegismund & Luca Fumagalli
Over the past two decades, an increasing amount of phylogeographic work has substantially improved our understanding of African biogeography, in particular the role played by Pleistocene pluvial–drought cycles on terrestrial vertebrates. However, still little is known on the evolutionary history of semi-aquatic animals, which faced tremendous challenges imposed by unpredictable availability of water resources. In this study, we investigate the Late Pleistocene history of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence...

Data from: Beyond thermal limits: comprehensive metrics of performance identify key axes of thermal adaptation in ants

Clint A. Penick, Sarah E. Diamond, Nathan J. Sanders & Robert R. Dunn
How species respond to temperature change depends in large part on their physiology. Physiological traits, such as critical thermal limits (CTmax and CTmin), provide estimates of thermal performance but may not capture the full impacts of temperature on fitness. Rather, thermal performance likely depends on a combination of traits—including thermal limits—that vary among species. Here we examine how thermal limits correlate with the main components that influence fitness in ants. First, we compare how temperature...

Data from: Extinctions, genetic erosion and conservation options for the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)

Yoshan Moodley, Isa-Rita M. Russo, Desiré L. Dalton, Antoinette Kotzé, Shadrack Muya, Patricia Haubensak, Boglárka Bálint, Gopi K. Munimanda, Caroline Deimel, Andrea Setzer, Kara Dicks, Barbara Herzig-Straschil, Daniela C. Kalthoff, Hans R. Siegismund, Jan Robovský, Paul O’Donoghue & Michael W. Bruford
The black rhinoceros is again on the verge of extinction due to unsustainable poaching in its native range. Despite a wide historic distribution, the black rhinoceros was traditionally thought of as depauperate in genetic variation, and with very little known about its evolutionary history. This knowledge gap has hampered conservation efforts because hunting has dramatically reduced the species’ once continuous distribution, leaving five surviving gene pools of unknown genetic affinity. Here we examined the range-wide...

Data from: Climate change and human colonization triggered habitat loss and fragmentation in Madagascar.

Jordi Salmona, Rasmus Heller, Erwan Quéméré & Lounès Chikhi
The relative effect of past climate fluctuations and anthropogenic activities on current biome distribution is subject to increasing attention, notably in biodiversity hot spots. In Madagascar, where humans arrived in the last ~4 to 5,000 years, the exact causes of the demise of large vertebrates that cohabited with humans are yet unclear. The prevailing narrative holds that Madagascar was covered with forest before human arrival and that the expansion of grasslands was the result of...

Data from: The effects of insects, nutrients, and plant invasion on community structure and function above- and belowground

Phoebe Wright, Melissa A. Cregger, Lara Souza, Nathan J. Sanders & Aimée T. Classen
Soil nutrient availability, invasive plants, and insect presence can directly alter ecosystem structure and function, but less is known about how these factors may interact. In this 6-year study in an old-field ecosystem, we manipulated insect abundance (reduced and control), the propagule pressure of an invasive nitrogen-fixing plant (propagules added and control), and soil nutrient availability (nitrogen added, nitrogen reduced and control) in a fully crossed, completely randomized plot design. We found that nutrient amendment...

Data from: Latitudinal variation in plant chemical defences drives latitudinal patterns of leaf herbivory

Xoaquón Moreira, Bastien Castagneyrol, Luis Abdala-Roberts, Jorge C. Berny-Mier Y Terán, Bart G. H. Timmermans, Hans Henrik Kehlet Bruun, Felisa Covelo, Gaétan Glauser, Sergio Rasmann, Ayco J. M. Tack & Hans Henrik Bruun
A long-standing paradigm in ecology holds that herbivore pressure and thus plant defences increase towards lower latitudes. However, recent work has challenged this prediction where studies have found no relationship or opposite trends where herbivory or plant defences increase at higher latitudes. Here we tested for latitudinal variation in herbivory, chemical defences (phenolic compounds), and nutritional traits (phosphorus and nitrogen) in leaves of a long-lived tree species, the English oak Quercus robur. We further investigated...

Data from: Red and orange flags for secondary headaches in clinical practice: SNNOOP10 list

Thien Phu Do, Angelique Remmers, Henrik Winther Schytz, Christoph Schankin, Sarah E. Nelson, Mark Obermann, Jakob Møller Hansen, Alexandra J. Sinclair, Andreas R. Ganteinbein & Guus G. Schoonman
A minority of headache patients have a secondary headache disorder. The medical literature presents and promotes red flags to increase the likelihood of identifying a secondary etiology. In this review, we aim to discuss the incidence and prevalence of secondary headaches as well as the data on sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of red flags for secondary headaches. We review the following red flags: (1) systemic symptoms including fever; (2) neoplasm history; (3) neurologic deficit...

Data from: Mass-independent maximal metabolic rate predicts geographic range size of placental mammals

Jack P. Hayes, Chris R. Feldman & Miguel B. Araújo
1.Understanding the mechanisms driving geographic range sizes of species is a central issue in ecology, but remarkably few rules link physiology with the distributions of species. Maximal metabolic rate (MMR) during exercise is an important measure of physiological performance. It sets an upper limit to sustained activity and locomotor capacity, so MMR may influence ability to migrate, disperse, and maintain population connectivity. Using both conventional ordinary least squares (OLS) analyses and phylogenetically generalized least squares...

Data from: Prey‐specific impact of cold pre‐exposure on kill rate and reproduction

Kim Jensen, Søren Toft, Lene Sigsgard, Jesper G. Sørensen, Martin Holmstrup & Lene Sigsgaard
1.Temperature influences biological processes of ectotherms including ecological interactions, but interaction strengths may depend on species‐specific traits. Furthermore, ectotherms acclimate to prevailing thermal conditions by adjusting physiological parameters, which often implies costs to other fitness‐related parameters. Both predators and prey may therefore pay thermal acclimation costs following exposure to suboptimal temperatures. However, these costs may be asymmetrical between predator and prey, and between the predator and different species of concurrent prey. 2.We investigated whether thermal...

Data from: Experimental warming in the field delays phenology and reduces body mass and survival: implications for the persistence of a pollinator under climate change

Paul J. CaraDonna, James L. Cunningham & Amy M. Iler
1. Climate change is rapidly altering thermal environments across the globe. The effects of increased temperatures in already warm environments may be particularly strong because organisms are likely to be near their thermal safety margins, with limited tolerance to additional heat stress. 2. We conduct an in situ field experiment over two years to investigate the direct effects of temperature on an early-season solitary bee in a warm, arid region of the Southwestern USA. Our...

Data from: Artificial selection on ant female caste ratio uncovers a link between female-biased sex ratios and infection by Wolbachia endosymbionts

Luigi Pontieri, Anna M. Schmidt, Rohini Singh, Jes Søe Pedersen & Timothy A. Linksvayer
Social insect sex and caste ratios are well-studied targets of evolutionary conflicts, but the heritable factors affecting these traits remain unknown. To elucidate these factors, we carried out a short-term artificial selection study on female caste ratio in the ant Monomorium pharaonis. Across three generations of bidirectional selection, we observed no response for caste ratio, but sex ratios rapidly became more female-biased in the two replicate high selection lines and less female-biased in the two...

Data from: Evidence for varying social strategies across the day in chacma baboons

Claudia Sick, Alecia J. Carter, Harry H. Marshall, Leslie A. Knapp, Torben Dabelsteen & Guy Cowlishaw
Strong social bonds can make an important contribution to individual fitness, but we still have only a limited understanding of the temporal period relevant to the adjustment of social relationships. While there is growing recognition of the importance of strong bonds that persist for years, social relationships can also vary over weeks and months, suggesting that social strategies may be optimized over shorter timescales. Using biological market theory as a framework, we explore whether temporal...

Data from: Polyphasic data support the splitting of Aspergillus candidus into two species; proposal of Aspergillus dobrogensis sp. nov.

Vit Hubka, Alena Nováková, Željko Jurjević, František Sklenář, Jens C. Frisvad, Jos Houbraken, Maiken C. Arendrup, João P. Z. Siqueira, Josepa Gené & Miroslav Kolařík
Aspergillus candidus is a species frequently isolated from stored grain, food, indoor environments, soil and occasionally also from clinical material. Recent bioprospecting studies highlighted the potential of using A. candidus and its relatives in various industrial sectors as a result of their significant production of enzymes and bioactive compounds. A high genetic variability was observed among A. candidus isolates originating from various European countries and the USA, that were mostly isolated from indoor environments, caves...

Data from: Testosterone in ancient hair from an extinct species

Lee Koren, Devorah Matas, Patrícia Pečnerová, Love Dalén, Alexei Tikhonov, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Katherine E. Wynne-Edwards & Eli Geffen
Testosterone is a key regulator in vertebrate development, physiology, and behaviour. Whereas technology allows extraction of a wealth of genetic information from extant as well as extinct species, complimentary information on steroid hormone levels may add a social, sexual, and environmental context. Hair shafts have been previously used to sequence DNA from >50,000 14C years old Siberian woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius). Hair-testing has also been used to measure endogenous steroids in multiple extant species. Here...

Data from: Genetic resources of teak (Tectona grandis Linn. f.) – strong genetic structure among natural populations

Ole K. Hansen, Suchitra Changtragoon, Bundit Ponoy, Erik D. Kjær, Yazar Minn, Reiner Finkeldey, Knud B. Nielsen & Lars Graudal
Twenty-nine provenances of teak (Tectona grandis Linn. f.) representing the full natural distribution range of the species were genotyped with microsatellite DNA markers to analyse genetic diversity and population genetic structure. Provenances originating from the semi-moist east coast of India had the highest genetic diversity while provenances from Laos showed the lowest. In the eastern part of the natural distribution area, comprising Myanmar, Thailand and Laos, there was a strong clinal decrease in genetic diversity...

Data from: Evolution of non-kin cooperation: social assortment by cooperative phenotype in guppies

Josefine Brask, Darren Croft, Matthew Edenbrow, Richard James, Heather Bleakley, Indar Ramnarine, Robert Heathcote, Charles Tyler, Patrick Hamilton, Torben Dabelsteen & Safi Darden
Cooperation among non-kin constitutes a conundrum for evolutionary biology. Theory suggests that non-kin cooperation can evolve if individuals differ consistently in their cooperative phenotypes and assort socially by these, such that cooperative individuals interact predominantly with one another. However, our knowledge of the role of cooperative phenotypes in the social structuring of real-world animal populations is minimal. In this study, we investigated cooperative phenotypes and their link to social structure in wild Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia...

Data from: Electromagnetic source imaging in presurgical workup of patients with epilepsy: a prospective study

Lene Duez, Hatice Tankisi, Peter O. Hansen, Per Sidenius, Anne Sabers, Lars H. Pinborg, Martin Fabricius, György Rásonyi, Guido Rubboli, Birthe Pedersen, Anne-Mette Leffers, Peter Uldall, Bo Jespersen, Jannick Brennum, Otto M. Henriksen, Anders Fuglsang-Frederiksen & Sándor Beniczky
Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of electromagnetic source imaging (EMSI) in presurgical evaluation of patients with epilepsy. Methods: We prospectively recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) simultaneously with electroencephalography (EEG) and performed EMSI, comprising electric (ESI), magnetic source imaging (MSI) and analysis of combined MEG-EEG datasets (cEMSI), using two different software packages. As reference standard for irritative zone (IZ) and seizure onset zone (SOZ) we used intracranial recordings and for localization accuracy, outcome one...

Data from: Locality or habitat? Exploring predictors of biodiversity in Amazonia

Camila D. Ritter, Alexander Zizka, Christopher Barnes, R. Henrik Nilsson, Fabian Roger & Alexandre Antonelli
Amazonia is an environmentally heterogeneous and biologically megadiverse region, and its biodiversity varies considerably over space. However, existing knowledge on Amazonian biodiversity and its environmental determinants stems almost exclusively from studies of macroscopic above‐ground organisms, notably vertebrates and trees. In contrast, diversity patterns of most other organisms remain elusive, although some of them, for instance microorganisms, constitute the overwhelming majority of taxa in any given location, both in terms of diversity and abundance. Here, we...

Data from: Field observations of turbulence, sand suspension and cross-shore transport under spilling and plunging breakers

Troels Aagaard, Michael G. Hughes & Gerben Ruessink
Measurements of wave orbital velocity, near-bed turbulence levels and sediment suspension were obtained under plunging and spilling breakers in the outer surf zone on the beach at Vejers, Denmark. For the same range of relative wave heights and indicators of wave nonlinearity, we observed significantly larger suspended sediment concentrations and onshore-directed rates of suspended sediment transport under (long-period) plunging breakers, compared to (short-period) spilling breakers. This is consistent with the long-held understanding that, for a...

Data from: Scrutinizing key steps for reliable metabarcoding of environmental samples

Antton Alberdi, Ostaizka Aizpurua, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Kristine Bohmann
1. Metabarcoding of environmental samples has many challenges and limitations that require carefully considered laboratory and analysis pipelines to ensure reliable results. We explore how decisions regarding study design, laboratory work and bioinformatic processing affect the final results, and provide guidelines for reliable study of environmental samples. 2. We evaluate the performance of four primer sets targeting COI and 16S regions characterising arthropod diversity in bat faecal samples, and investigate how metabarcoding results are affected...

Data from: Influence of hepatitis C virus and IL28B genotypes on liver stiffness

Lene Fogt Lundbo, Louise Nygaard Clausen, Nina Weis, Kristian Schønning, Lene Rosenørn, Thomas Benfield & Peer Brehm Christensen
Objective: Liver fibrosis has been associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype and genetic variation near the interleukin 28B (IL28B) gene, but the relative contribution is unknown. We aimed to investigate the relation between HCV genotypes, IL28B and development of liver stiffness. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study consists of 369 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastograhy (TE). Factors associated with development of liver fibrosis were identified by...

Data from: Effect of ecological momentary assessment, goal-setting and personalized phone-calls on adherence to interval walking training using the InterWalk application among patients with type 2 diabetes – a pilot randomized controlled trial

Laura Staun Valentiner, Ida Kær Thorsen, Malte Bue Kongstad, Cecilie Fau Brinkløv, Rasmus Tolstrup Larsen, Kristian Karstoft, Jens Steen Nielsen, Bente Klarlund Pedersen, Henning Langberg & Mathias Ried-Larsen
Objectives: The objective was to investigate the feasibility and usability of structured text-messages, goal-setting and phone-calls on adherence to a 12-week self-conducted interval walking training (IWT) program, delivered by the InterWalk smartphone among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods: In a two-arm pilot randomized controlled trial (Denmark, March 2014 to February 2015), patients with T2D (18-80 years with a Body Mass Index of 18 and 40 kg/m2) were randomly allocated to 12 weeks of...

Data from: Idiosyncratic responses to climate-driven forest fragmentation and marine incursions in reed frogs from Central Africa and the Gulf of Guinea Islands

Rayna C. Bell, Juan L. Parra, Gabriel Badjedjea, Michael F. Barej, David C. Blackburn, Marius Burger, Alan Channing, J. Maximilian Dehling, Eli Greenbaum, Václav Gvoždík, Jos Kielgast, Chifundera Kusamba, Stefan Lötters, Patrick J. McLaughlin, Zoltán T. Nagy, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Daniel M. Portik, Bryan L. Stuart, Jeremy VanDerWal, Ange-Ghislain Zassi Boulou & Kelly R. Zamudio
Organismal traits interact with environmental variation to mediate how species respond to shared landscapes. Thus, differences in traits related to dispersal ability or physiological tolerance may result in phylogeographic discordance among co-distributed taxa, even when they are responding to common barriers. We quantified climatic suitability and stability, and phylogeographic divergence within three reed frog species complexes across the Guineo-Congolian forests and Gulf of Guinea archipelago of Central Africa to investigate how they responded to a...

Data from: Environmental variation is a major predictor of global trait turnover in mammals

Ben G. Holt, Gabriel C. Costa, Caterina Penone, Jean-Philippe Lessard, Thomas M. Brooks, Ana D. Davidson, S. Blair Hedges, Volker C. Radeloff, Carsten Rahbek, Carlo Rondinini & Catherine H. Graham
Aim: To evaluate how environment and evolutionary history interact to influence global patterns of mammal trait diversity (a combination of 14 morphological and life-history traits). Location: The global terrestrial environment. Taxon: Terrestrial mammals. Methods: We calculated patterns of spatial turnover for mammalian traits and phylogenetic lineages using the mean nearest taxon distance. We then used a variance partitioning approach to establish the relative contribution of trait conservatism, ecological adaptation and clade specific ecological preferences on...

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