45 Works

Data from: No evidence for maintenance of a sympatric Heliconius species barrier by chromosomal inversions

John W. Davey, Sarah L. Barker, Pasi M. Rastas, Ana Pinharanda, Simon H. Martin, Richard Durbin, W. Owen McMillan, Richard M. Merrill & Chris D. Jiggins
Mechanisms that suppress recombination are known to help maintain species barriers by preventing the breakup of coadapted gene combinations. The sympatric butterfly species Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius cydno are separated by many strong barriers, but the species still hybridize infrequently in the wild, and around 40% of the genome is influenced by introgression. We tested the hypothesis that genetic barriers between the species are maintained by inversions or other mechanisms that reduce between-species recombination rate....

Data from: Host-specific effects of soil microbial filtrates prevail over those of arbuscular mycorrhizae in a fragmented landscape

Camila Pizano, Scott A. Mangan, James H. Graham & Kaoru Kitajima
Plant-soil interactions have been shown to determine plant community composition in a wide range of environments. However, how plants distinctly interact with beneficial and detrimental organisms across mosaic landscapes containing fragmented habitats is still poorly understood. We experimentally tested feedback responses between plants and soil microbial communities from adjacent habitats across a disturbance gradient within a human-modified tropical montane landscape. In a greenhouse experiment, two components of soil microbial communities were amplified; arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: Leaf trait variations associated with habitat affinity of tropical karst tree species

Nalaka Geekiyanage, Uromi Goodale, Kunfang Cao, Kaoru Kitajima & Uromi Manage Goodale
1. Karst hills, i.e., jagged topography created by dissolution of limestone and other soluble rocks, are distributed extensively in tropical forest regions, including southern parts of China. They are characterized by a sharp mosaic of water and nutrient availability, from exposed hilltops with poor soil development to valleys with occasional flooding, to which trees show species specific distributions. Here we report the relationship of leaf functional traits to habitat preference of tropical karst trees. 2....

Data from: The Automated Root Exudate System (ARES): a method to apply solutes at regular intervals to soils in the field

Luis Lopez-Sangil, Charles T. George, Eduardo Medina-Barcenas, Ali J. Birkett, Catherine Baxendale, Laetitia M. Bréchet, Eduard Estradera-Gumbau, Emma J. Sayer & Charles George
1) Root exudation is a key component of nutrient and carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems. Exudation rates vary widely by plant species and environmental conditions but our understanding of how root exudates affect soil functioning is incomplete, in part because there are few viable methods to manipulate root exudates in situ. To address this, we devised the Automated Root Exudate System (ARES), which simulates increased root exudation by applying small amounts of labile solutes at...

Data from: Anchored hybrid enrichment provides new insights into the phylogeny and evolution of longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae)

Stephanie Haddad, Seunggwan Shin, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Petr Svacha, Brian Farrell, Adam Ślipiński, Donald Windsor & Duane D. McKenna
Cerambycidae is a species-rich family of mostly wood-feeding (xylophagous) beetles containing nearly 35 000 known species. The higher-level phylogeny of Cerambycidae has never been robustly reconstructed using molecular phylogenetic data or a comprehensive sample of higher taxa, and its internal relationships and evolutionary history remain the subjects of ongoing debate. We reconstructed the higher-level phylogeny of Cerambycidae using phylogenomic data from 522 single copy nuclear genes, generated via anchored hybrid enrichment. Our taxon sample (31...

Data from: Distance-dependent seedling mortality and long-term spacing dynamics in a neotropical forest community

Stephen J. Murphy, Thorsten Wiegand & Liza S. Comita
Negative distance dependence (NDisD), or reduced recruitment near adult conspecifics, is thought to explain the astounding diversity of tropical forests. While many studies show greater mortality at near vs. far distances from adults, these studies do not seek to track changes in the peak seedling curve over time, thus limiting our ability to link NDisD to coexistence. Using census data collected over 12 years from central Panama in conjunction with spatial mark-connection functions, we show...

Data from: Photosynthetic acclimation to warming in tropical forest tree seedlings

Martijn Slot & Klaus Winter
Tropical forests have a mitigating effect on man-made climate change by acting as a carbon sink. For that effect to continue, tropical trees will have to acclimate to rising temperatures, but it is currently unknown whether they have this capacity. We grew seedlings of three tropical tree species over a range of temperature regimes (TGrowth = 25, 30, 35 °C) and measured the temperature response of photosynthetic CO2 uptake. All species showed signs of acclimation:...

Data from: The role of soil chemistry and plant neighbourhoods in structuring fungal communities in three Panamanian rainforests

Tyler Schappe, Felipe E. Albornoz, Benjamin L. Turner, Abigail Neat, Richard Condit & F. Andrew Jones
Fungi play critical roles in ecosystem processes and interact with plant communities in mutualistic, pathogenic, and commensal ways. Fungal communities are thought to depend on both associated tree communities and soil properties. However, the relative importance of the biotic and abiotic drivers of soil fungal community structure and diversity in lowland tropical forests remains poorly understood. We examined the community structure of trees and fungi at different levels of phosphorus (0·17–16·3 mg kg−1) in moist...

Data from: Aboveground biomass is driven by mass-ratio effects and stand structural attributes in a temperate deciduous forest

Alexander T. Fotis, Stephen J. Murphy, Raleigh D. Ricart, Meghna Krishnadas, James Whitacre, John W. Wenzel, Simon A. Queenborough & Liza S. Comita
1.Forest ecosystems are critical for the global regulation of carbon (C), a substantial portion of which is stored in aboveground biomass (AGB). While it is well understood that taxonomic and functional composition, stand structure, and environmental gradients influence spatial variation in AGB, the relative strengths of these drivers at landscape-scales has not been investigated in temperate forests. Furthermore, when biodiversity enhances C storage, it is unclear whether it is through mass-ratio effects (i.e., the dominant...

Data from: Mating patterns and post-mating isolation in three cryptic species of the Engystomops petersi species complex

Paula A. Trillo, Andrea E. Narvaez, Santiago R. Ron & Kim L. Hoke
Determining the extent of reproductive isolation in cryptic species with dynamic geographic ranges can give us important insights into the processes that generate and maintain genetic divergence in the absence of severe geographic barriers. We studied mating patterns, propensity to crossbreed in nature and subsequent fertilization rates, as well as survival and development of hybrid F1 offspring for three species of the E. petersi species complex in Yasuní National Park, Ecuador. We found at least...

Data from: Environmental conditions limit attractiveness of a complex sexual signal in the túngara frog

Wouter Halfwerk, Judith A. H. Smit, Hugo Loning, Amanda M. Lea, Inga Geipel, Jacintha Ellers & Michael J. Ryan
Animals choosing particular display sites often balance sexual and natural selection pressures. Here we assess how physical properties of display sites can alter this balance by influencing signal production and attractiveness of the túngara frog (Physalaemus pustulosus). Males that call from very shallow water bodies (few mm depth) benefit from reduced predation risk, but by manipulating water levels, we show that this comes at a cost of reduced attractiveness to females. Our data show that...

Data from: Tropical forest restoration: fast resilience of plant biomass contrasts with slow recovery of stable soil C stocks

Faming Wang, Yongzhen Ding, Emma Sayer, Qinlu Li, Bi Zou, Qifeng Mo, Yingwen Li, Xiaoliang Lu, Jianwu Tang, Weixing Zhu, Zhian Li & Emma J. Sayer
1. Due to intensifying human disturbance, over half of the world’s tropical forests are reforested or afforested secondary forests or plantations. Understanding the resilience of carbon (C) stocks in these forests, and estimating the extent to which they can provide equivalent carbon (C) sequestration and stabilization to the old growth forest they replace, is critical for the global C balance. 2. In this study, we combined estimates of biomass C stocks with a detailed assessment...

Data from: Seed polyphenols in a diverse tropical plant community

Sofia Gripenberg, Jadranka Rota, Jorma Kim, S. Joseph Wright, Nancy C. Garwood, Evan C. Fricke, Paul-Camilo Zalamea & Juha-Pekka Salminen
1. Polyphenols are one of the most common groups of secondary metabolites in plants and thought to play a key role in enhancing plant fitness by protecting plants against enemies. Although enemy-inflicted mortality at the seed stage can be an important regulator of plant populations and a key determinant of community structure, few studies have assessed community-level patterns of polyphenol content in seeds. 2. We describe the distribution of the main seed polyphenol groups across...

Data from: Food-sharing vampire bats are more nepotistic under conditions of perceived risk

Gerald G. Carter, Gerald S. Wilkinson & Rachel A. Page
Cooperative behaviors exist along a spectrum of cost, from no-risk scenarios of mutual benefit to self-sacrificing altruism. Hamilton’s rule predicts that as risk increases, cooperative decisions should become increasingly kin-biased (nepotistic). To manipulate the perceived risks of regurgitated food sharing in captive vampire bats, we created a novel “rescue” condition, which required that donors leave their preferred roosting location, descend to an illuminated spot on the cage floor, and regurgitate food across cage bars to...

Data from: Reconsidering the phosphorus limitation of soil microbial activity in tropical forests

Taiki Mori, Xiankai Lu, Ryota Aoyagi & Jiangming Mo
1. It has long been believed that soil microbial activity in tropical forest ecosystems is limited by phosphorus (P) rather than nitrogen (N) availability. In this study, we reviewed the methods used to determine the limiting nutrients and evaluated the validity of the widespread P-limitation hypothesis in tropical forest soils. 2. The most commonly used analysis method entails testing whether fertilization increased microbial biomass or soil respiration. Fertilization using microbial biomass as an indicator was...

Data from: Pre-dispersal seed predators and fungi differ in their effect on Luehea seemannii capsule development, seed germination and dormancy across two Panamanian forests

Pimonrat Tiansawat, Noelle G. Beckman & James W. Dalling
Pre-dispersal seed predation can greatly reduce crop size affecting recruitment success. Additionally, non-fatal damage by seed predators may allow infection by fungi responsible for post-dispersal seed losses. The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify pre-dispersal seed predation and fungal infection in a Neotropical tree species, Luehea seemannii, that produces dehiscent fruits and wind-dispersed seeds, and (2) to link pre-dispersal effects on seed quality to seed survival in the soil. To examine how seed...

Data from: Does sex matter? Gender-specific responses to forest fragmentation in Neotropical bats

Ricardo Rocha, Diogo F. Ferreira, Adrià López-Baucells, Fabio Z. Farneda, Joao M.B. Carreiras, Jorge M. Palmeirim & Christoph F. J. Meyer
Understanding the consequences of habitat modification on wildlife communities is central to the development of conservation strategies. However, albeit male and female individuals of numerous species are known to exhibit differences in habitat use, sex-specific responses to habitat modification remain little explored. Here, we used a landscape-scale fragmentation experiment to assess, separately for males and females, the effects of fragmentation on the abundance of Carollia perspicillata and Rhinophylla pumilio, two widespread Neotropical frugivorous bats. We...

Data from: Nutrient limitation or home field advantage: does microbial community adaptation overcome nutrient limitation of litter decomposition in a tropical peatland?

Jorge Hoyos-Santillan, Barry H. Lomax, Benjamin L. Turner & Sofie Sjögersten
Litter decomposition is an important control on carbon accumulation in tropical peatlands. Stoichiometric theory suggests that decomposition is regulated by elemental ratios in litter while the home field advantage (HFA) hypothesis predicts that decomposer communities are adapted to local conditions. To date, the relative importance of these contrasting theories for litter decomposition and therefore the carbon balance of tropical peatlands remain poorly understood. We conducted two in situ litter decomposition experiments in a lowland tropical...

Data from: Tree functional diversity affects litter decomposition and arthropod community composition in a tropical forest

Benita C. Laird-Hopkins, Laëtitia M. Bréchet, Biancolini C. Trujillo & Emma J. Sayer
Disturbance can alter tree species and functional diversity in tropical forests, which in turn could affect carbon and nutrient cycling via the decomposition of plant litter. However, the influence of tropical tree diversity on forest floor organisms and the processes they mediate are far from clear. We investigated the influence of different litter mixtures on arthropod communities and decomposition processes in a 60-year-old lowland tropical forest in Panama, Central America. We used litter mixtures representing...

Data from: The impact of even-aged and uneven-aged forest management on regional biodiversity of multiple taxa in European beech forests

Peter Schall, Martin M. Gossner, Steffi Heinrichs, Markus Fischer, Steffen Boch, Daniel Prati, Kirsten Jung, Vanessa Baumgartner, Stefan Blaser, Stefan Böhm, Francois Buscot, Rolf Daniel, Kezia Goldmann, Kirstin Kaiser, Tiemo Kahl, Markus Lange, Jörg Müller, Jörg Overmann, Swen C. Renner, Ernst-Detlef Schulze, Johannes Sikorski, Marco Tschapka, Manfred Türke, Wolfgang W. Weisser, Bernd Wemheuer … & Kristin Kaiser
For managed temperate forests, conservationists and policymakers favour fine-grained uneven-aged management over more traditional coarse-grained even-aged management, based on the assumption that within-stand habitat heterogeneity enhances biodiversity. There is, however, little empirical evidence to support this assumption. We investigated for the first time how differently grained forest management systems affect the biodiversity of multiple above- and below-ground taxa across spatial scales. We sampled 15 taxa of animals, plants, fungi and bacteria within the largest contiguous...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    45

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    45

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    45
  • Kyoto University
    3
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • Lancaster University
    3
  • The Open University
    3
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    2
  • National Museum
    2
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • The Ohio State University
    2
  • University of Montreal
    2