21 Works

Frankliniella fusca activity patterns in wheat

Anders Huseth, James Goethe, Seth Dorman, George Kennedy & Hehe Wang
Tobacco thrips (Frankliniella fusca Hinds) are an important seedling pest of many agricultural crops including, but not limited to cotton, tomato, and tobacco. This insect is mobile and completes several generations on both crop and non-crop plants each growing season in the southern United States. We do know that this insect disperses through a predictable sequence of these habitats each spring, however, it is not well known how abundant early season host crops affect population...

Phylogenetically diverse diets favor more complex venoms in North American pitvipers

Matthew Holding & Christopher Parkinson
The role of natural selection in the evolution of trait complexity can be characterized by testing hypothesized links between complex forms and their functions across species. Predatory venoms are traits composed of multiple proteins that collectively function to incapacitate prey. Venom complexity fluctuates considerably over evolutionary timescales, with apparent increases and decreases in complexity, yet the evolutionary causes of this variation is unclear. Here, we tested alternative hypotheses for the link between venom complexity and...

Data used in timing is everything: Dichogamy and pollen germinability underlie variation in autonomous selfing among populations

Laura Galloway & Matthew Koski
Premise of the study: The evolution of multiple floral traits often underlies the transition from outcrossing to selfing. Such traits can influence the ability to self, and the timing at which selfing occurs, which in turn affects the costs of selfing. Species that display variation in autonomous selfing provide an opportunity to dissect the phenotypic changes that contribute to variability in the mating system. Methods: In a common garden, we measured dichogamy and herkogamy in...

Raw genotyped total called structural variant (SV)

Kittikun Songsomboon, Zachary Brenton, James Heuser, Stephen Kresovich, Nadia Shakoor & Elizabeth Cooper
Genomic structural mutations especially deletion are an important source of variation in many species and can play key roles in phenotypic diversification and evolution. Previous work in many plant species, including some crops, has identified multiple instances of structural variations (SVs) occurring in or near genes related to stress response and disease resistance, suggesting a possible role for SVs in local adaptation. Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is one of the most widely grown cereal...

The effects of climate change on floral anthocyanin polymorphisms

Matthew Koski & Cierra Sullivan
Pigmentation affords resistance to abiotic stressors, and thus can respond adaptively or plastically to drought and extreme temperatures associated with global change. Plants frequently display variability in flower coloration that is underlain by anthocyanin pigmentation. While anthocyanin polymorphisms impact plant-animal interactions, they also impact reproductive performance under abiotic stress. We used descriptions of population-level flower color from >1900 herbarium records representing 12 North American species spanning 124 years to test whether flower color responded to...

Diversification of a polyploid complex: the biogeography and acoustic communication evolution of North American gray treefrogs throughout the Quaternary

William Booker, Emily Lemmon, Alan Lemmon, Margaret Ptacek, Alyssa Hassinger, Johannes Schul & H. Carl Gerhardt
Polyploid speciation and whole genome duplications are major drivers of biological diversity. After polyploid species are formed, the interactions between diploid and polyploid lineages may generate additional diversity in novel cytotypes and phenotypes. In anurans, mate choice by acoustic communication is the primary method by which individuals identify their own species and assess suitable mates. As such, the evolution of acoustic signals is an important mechanism for contributing to reproductive isolation and diversification in this...

Sex differences in the plasticity of life history in response to social environment

Elizabeth Lange, Margaret Ptacek, Joseph Travis & Kimberly Hughes
Predicting how social environment affects life history variation is critical to understanding if, and when, selection favors alternative life history development, especially in systems in which social interactions change over time or space. While sexual selection theory predicts that males and females should respond differently to variation in the social environment, few studies have examined the responses of both male and female phenotypes to the same gradient of social environment. In this study, we used...

Data from: Community-level responses of African carnivores to prescribed burning

Laura Gigliotti, Goncalo Curveira-Santos, Rob Slotow, Craig Sholto-Douglas, Lourens Swanepoel & David Jachowski
Fires are common in many ecosystems worldwide, and are frequently used as a management tool. Although the responses of herbivores to fire have been well-studied, the responses of carnivores to fire remain unclear. In particular, post-fire habitat changes, and the associated changes in prey availability, might affect the coexistence or competition of carnivore species within the larger carnivore community, but few studies have focused on how fires influence multiple carnivore species simultaneously. Using South African...

Data from: A geographic cline in the ability to self-fertilize is unrelated to the pollination environment

Laura Galloway, Matt Koski, Jeremiah Busch & Dena Grossenbacher
The reproductive assurance (RA) hypothesis predicts that the ability to autonomously self-fertilize should be favored in environments where a lack of mates or pollinators limits outcross reproduction. Because such limits to outcrossing are predicted to be most severe at range edges, elevated autonomy in peripheral populations is often attributed to RA. We test this hypothesis in 24 populations spanning the range of Campanula americana, including sampling at the range interior and three geographic range edges....

Data from: Prenatal acoustic programming of mitochondrial function for high temperatures in an arid-adapted bird

Eve Udino, Julia George, Matthew McKenzie, Anaïs Pessato, Ondi Crino, Katherine Buchanan & Mylene Mariette
Sound is an essential source of information in many taxa and can notably be used by embryos to program their phenotypes for postnatal environments. While underlying mechanisms are mostly unknown, there is growing evidence for the implication of mitochondria – main source of cellular energy (i.e. ATP) – in developmental programming processes. Here, we tested whether prenatal sound programs mitochondrial metabolism. In the arid-adapted zebra finch, prenatal exposure to “heat-calls” – produced by parents incubating...

Data from: Geographic variation in pollen color is associated with temperature stress

Laura Galloway & Matthew Koski
The evolution of flower color, especially petal pigmentation, has received substantial attention. Less understood is the evolutionary ecology of pollen pigmentation though it varies among and within species and its biochemical properties affect pollen viability. We characterize the distribution of pollen color across 24 populations of the North American herb Campanula americana, and assess the degree to which this variation is genetically based. We identify abiotic factors that covary with pollen color and test whether...

Soil biogeochemistry across Central and South American tropical dry forests

Bonnie Waring, Mark De Guzman, Dan Du, Juan Dupuy, Maga Gei, Jessica Gutknecht, Catherine Hulshof, Nicolas Jelinski, Andrew Margenot, David Medvigy, Camila Pizano, Beatriz Salgado-Negret, Naomi Schwartz, Annette Trierweiler, Skip Van Bloem, German Vargas G & Jennifer Powers
The availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) controls the flow of carbon (C) among plants, soils, and the atmosphere, thereby shaping terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change. Soil C, N, and P cycles are linked by drivers operating at multiple spatial and temporal scales: landscape-level variation in macroclimate, seasonality, and soil geochemistry; stand-scale heterogeneity in forest composition and structure; and microbial community dynamics at the soil pore scale. Yet in many biomes, we do...

Macroevolution of flower color patterning: biased transition rates and correlated evolution with flower size

Matthew Koski
Floral pigmentation patterns can both mediate plant-pollinator interactions and modify the abiotic environment of reproductive structures. To date there have been no inquiries into the rate and directionality of macroevolutionary transitions between patterned and non-patterned petals despite their ecological importance and ubiquity across angiosperms. Petals in the Potentilleae tribe (Rosaceae) display color patterns in the ultraviolet (UV) and human-visible spectrum, or can be uniform in color (i.e., patternless). Using a phylogeny of Potentilleae, I test...

Data from: Elevational divergence in pigmentation plasticity is associated with selection and pigment biochemistry

Matthew Koski
Phenotypic plasticity is predicted to evolve in environmentally variable habitats, or those experiencing a high frequency of strong selection. However, the evolution of plasticity may be constrained by costs or physiological constraints. In flowers, UV-absorbing pigmentation ameliorates UV damage to pollen, and is linked with elevated UV exposure. Whether plasticity contributes to this pattern remains unclear. Petals of Argentina anserina have larger UV-absorbing petal areas at high elevations where they experience higher and more variable...

Blueprint for phasing and assembling the genomes of heterozygous polyploids: Application to the octoploid genome of strawberry

Michael Hardigan, Mitchell Feldmann, Randi Famula, Michaela Vachev, Mary Madera, Philipp Zerbe, Kristin Mars, Paul Peluso, David Rank, Shujun Ou, Christopher Saski, Charlotte Acharya, Glenn Cole, Alan Yocca, Patrick Edger & Steven Knapp
The challenge of allelic diversity for assembling haplotypes is exemplified in polyploid genomes containing homoeologous chromosomes of identical ancestry, and significant homologous variation within their ancestral subgenomes. Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and its progenitors are outbred octoploids in which up to eight homologous and homoeologous alleles are preserved. This introduces significant risk of haplotype collapse, switching, and chimeric fusions during assembly. Using third generation HiFi sequences from PacBio, we assembled the genome of the...

Supporting data for: Gene-rich UV sex chromosomes harbor conserved regulators of sexual development (Carey et al., 2021)

Sarah Carey, Shenqiang Shu, John Lovell, Avinash Shenqiang, Florian Maumus, George Tiley, Noe Fernandez-Pozo, Kerrie Barry, Cindy Chen, Mei Wang, Anna Lipzen, Chris Daum, Christopher Saski, Adam Payton, Jordan McBreen, Roth Conrad, Leslie Kollar, Sanna Olsson, Sanna Huttunen, Jacob Landis, Norman Wickett, Matthew Johnson, Stefan Rensing, Jane Grimwood, Jeremy Schmutz … & Adam Healey
Non-recombining sex chromosomes, like the mammalian Y, often lose genes and accumulate transposable elements, a process termed degeneration. The correlation between suppressed recombination and degeneration is clear in animal XY systems, but the absence of recombination is confounded with other asymmetries between the X and Y. In contrast, UV sex chromosomes, like those found in bryophytes, experience symmetrical population genetic conditions. Here we generate and use nearly gapless female and male chromosome-scale reference genomes of...

Floral spectral reflectance data for: Floral color properties of serpentine seep assemblages depend on community size and species richness

Kathryn LeCroy, Gerardo Arceo-Gómez, Matthew Koski, Nathan Morehouse & Tia-Lynn Ashman
Functional traits, particularly those that impact fitness, can shape the ecological and evolutionary relationships among coexisting species of the same trophic level. Thus, examining these traits and properties of their distributions (underdispersion, overdispersion) within communities can provide insights into key ecological interactions (e.g., competition, facilitation) involved in community assembly. For instance, the distribution of floral colors in a community may reflect pollinator-mediated interactions between sympatric plant species, and the phylogenetic distribution of color can inform...

Data and code for analysis of effects of climate change on kangaskhan and summary of simulations from Warren et al. 2020

Dan Warren, Alex Dornburg, Katerina Zapfe & Teresa Iglesias
Species distribution models (SDMs) are frequently used to predict the effects of climate change on species of conservation concern. Biases inherent in the process of constructing SDMs and transferring them to new climate scenarios may result in undesirable conservation outcomes. We explore these issues and demonstrate new methods to estimate biases induced by the design of SDM studies. We present these methods in the context of estimating the effects of climate change on Australia’s only...

Dental measurement and diet data for mammals

Samantha Hopkins, Samantha Price & Alec Chiono
Because teeth are the most easily preserved part of the vertebrate skeleton and are particularly morphologically variable in mammals, studies of fossil mammals rely heavily on dental morphology. Dental morphology is used both for systematics and phylogeny as well as for inferences about paleoecology, diet in particular. We analyze the influence of evolutionary history on our ability to reconstruct diet from dental morphology in the mammalian order Carnivora, and we find that much of our...

White Sands desert lizard thermal data

Alex Gunderson, Eric Riddell, Michael Sears & Erica Bree Rosenblum
Traits often contribute to multiple functions, complicating our understanding of the selective pressures that influence trait evolution. In the Chihuahuan Desert, predation is thought to be the primary driver of cryptic light coloration in three White Sands lizard species relative to the darker coloration of populations on adjacent dark soils. However, coloration also influences radiation absorption and thus animal body temperatures. We combined comparative physiological experiments and biophysical models to test for thermal consequences of...

Black Scoter habitat use along the southeastern coast of the United States

Beth Ross, Hannah Plumpton & Emily Silverman
While the Atlantic Coast of the United States and Canada is a major wintering area for sea ducks, knowledge about their wintering habitat use is relatively limited. Black Scoters have a broad wintering distribution and are the only open water species of sea duck that is abundant along the southeastern coast of the United States. Our study identified variables that affected Black Scoter (Melanitta americana) distribution and abundance in the Atlantic Ocean along the southeastern...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • Clemson University
    21
  • University of Virginia
    4
  • Florida State University
    3
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • Iowa State University
    2
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1
  • California Polytechnic State University
    1
  • Pacific Biosciences (United States)
    1
  • University of Notre Dame
    1