356 Works

Dataset: Multiplexed Illumination for Classifying Visually Similar Objects

Taihua Wang & Danserau Donald G

Knowledge, skills and barriers to evidence-based practice and the impact of a flipped classroom training program for physical therapists: an observational study

Leora Harrison, David Wong, Alison R Harmer & Matthew Jennings
Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, skills and barriers to evidence-based practice and the impact of evidence-based practice training for physical therapy clinicians. Methods: Physical therapists from a health district in Sydney, Australia were invited to participate. The primary outcome was the Assessing Competency in Evidence-based Medicine scale (range 0-15; 15 is high knowledge and skill) to quantify knowledge and skills. The secondary outcomes were the four subscales of the BARRIERS scale (range 1-4; 4 is...

Nightly selection of resting sites and group behavior reveal anti-predator strategies in giraffe

Anna Lena Burger, Julian Fennessy, Stephanie Fennessy & Paul W. Dierkes
This study presents the first findings on nocturnal behavior patterns of wild Angolan giraffe. We characterized their nocturnal behavior and analyzed the influence of ecological factors such as group size, season and habitat use. Giraffe were observed using night vision systems and thermal imaging cameras on Okapuka Ranch, Namibia. A total of 77 giraffe were observed during 24 nights over two distinct periods – July-August 2016 (dry season) and February-March 2017 (wet season). Photoperiod had...

Increased physical activity does not improve obesity-induced decreases in muscle quality in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Frank Seebacher & Rob S. James
Obesity has a negative effect on muscle contractile function, and the effects of obesity are not reversed by weight loss. It is therefore important to determine how muscle function can be restored, and exercise is the most promising approach. We tested the hypothesis (in zebrafish, Danio rerio) that moderate aerobic exercise (forced swimming for 30 min per day, raising metabolic rates to at least twice resting levels) will alleviate the negative effects of obesity of...

Differences in oxidative status explain variation in thermal acclimation capacity between individual mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki)

Frank Seebacher & Isabella Loughland
1. Evolutionary theory predicts that the capacity to acclimate should be favoured in variable environments. However, perfect compensation for thermal variation is rare and the capacity for thermal acclimation can vary considerably between individuals within natural populations. This variation may be explained by costs associated with acclimation, but it is not clear what these costs are. 2. We tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress is a cost of acclimation that could explain the variation between...

Data from: Deciphering genetic mate choice: not so simple in group-housed conservation breeding programs

Katherine Farquharson, Carolyn Hogg, Katherine Belov & Catherine Grueber
Incorporating mate choice into conservation breeding programs can improve reproduction and the retention of natural behaviours. However, different types of genetic-based mate choice can have varied consequences for genetic diversity management. As a result, it is important to examine mechanisms of mate choice in captivity to assess its costs and benefits. Most research in this area has focused on experimental pairing trials, however this resource-intensive approach is not always feasible in captive settings and can...

Supplementary material for: Phylogenomic analysis of ultraconserved elements reveals the recent evolutionary radiation of the fairy wrasses (Teleostei: Labridae: Cirrhilabrus)

Yi-Kai Tea, Xin Xu, Joseph DiBattista, Nathan Lo, Peter Cowman & Simon Ho
The fairy wrasses (genus Cirrhilabrus) are among the most captivating and successful of the extant wrasse lineages (Teleostei: Labridae), with their 61 species accounting for nearly 10% of the family. Although species complexes within the genus have been diagnosed on the basis of coloration patterns and synapomorphies, attempts to resolve the evolutionary relationships using molecular and morphological data have largely been unsuccessful. Here we use a phylogenomic analysis of 991 ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and mitochondrial...

Nitrogen enrichment buffers phosphorus limitation by mobilizing mineral-bound soil phosphorus in grasslands

Ruzhen Wang, Junjie Yang, Heyong Liu, Jordi Sardans, Yunhai Zhang, Xiaobo Wang, Cunzheng Wei, Xiaotao Lü, Feike Dijkstra, Yong Jiang, Xingguo Han & Josep Peñuelas
Phosphorus (P) limitation is expected to increase due to nitrogen (N)-induced terrestrial eutrophication, although most soils contain large P pools immobilized in minerals (Pi) and organic matter (Po). Here we assessed whether transformations of these P pools can increase plant available pools alleviating P limitation under enhanced N availability. The mechanisms underlying these possible transformations were explored by combining results from a 10-year field N-addition experiment and a 3700-km transect covering wide ranges in soil...

Data from: Tradeoffs affect the adaptive value of plasticity: Stronger cannibal-induced defenses incur greater costs in toad larvae

Jayna DeVore, Michael Crossland & Richard Shine
Adaptive developmental plasticity allows individuals to match their phenotype with their environment, which can increase fitness where threats are inconsistently present. Because adaptive traits are not ubiquitously nor infinitely plastic, tradeoffs between benefits and costs or limits are theoretically necessary to constrain plastic responses. Systems in which extreme risk can be reliably detected are ideal for investigating mechanisms that constrain plasticity, as even costly responses may be adaptive where risk is severe. Cane toads (Rhinella...

The geometry of resource constraint: an empirical study of the golden snub-nosed monkey

Rong Hou, Colin Chapman, Jessica Rothman, He Zhang, Kang Huang, Songtao Guo, Baoguo Li & David Raubenheimer
1. Apposite conceptualization and measurement of resource variation is critical for understanding many issues in ecology, including ecological niches, persistence and distribution of populations, the structure of communities, and population resilience to perturbations. 2. We apply the nutritional geometry framework to conceptualise and quantify the responses of a temperate-living primate, the golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) to variation in resource quality and quantity and in nutrient requirements associated with seasonal environments. 3. We present a...

Carbon allocation to the rhizosphere is affected by drought and nitrogen addition

Ruzhen Wang, Timothy Cavagnaro, Yong Jiang, Claudia Keitel, Feike Dijkstra, Timothy R. Cavagnaro & Feike A. Dijkstra
Photosynthetic carbon (C) allocated below-ground can be shared with mycorrhizal fungi in exchange for nutrients, but also added into soil as rhizodeposits that potentially increases plant nutrient supply by supporting microbial nutrient mineralization from organic matter. How water and nitrogen (N) availabilities affect plant C allocation to the rhizosphere, including both arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) symbionts and rhizodeposits, remains largely unknown. We used a 13CO2 pulse labelling experiment to assess effects of drought and N...

Queen pheromone modulates the expression of epigenetic modifier genes in the brain of honeybee workers

, Isobel Ronai, Klaus Hartfelder & Benjamin Oldroyd
Pheromones are used by many insects to mediate social interactions. In the highly eusocial honeybee (Apis mellifera) queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) is involved in the regulation of the reproductive and other behaviour of workers. The molecular mechanisms by which QMP acts are largely unknown. Here we investigate how genes responsible for epigenetic modifications to DNA, RNA and histones respond to the presence of QMP in the environment. We show that several of these genes are...

2020 NRAUS Australia New Zealand Food Category Cost Dataset

Michelle Blumfield, Carlene Starck, Tim Keighley, Peter Petocz, Anna Roesler, Elif Inan-Eroglu, Tim Cassettari, Skye Marshall & Flavia Fayet-Moore
This Australian and New Zealand food category cost dataset was created to inform diet and economic modelling for low and medium socioeconomic households in Australia and New Zealand. The dataset was created according to the INFORMAS protocol, which details the methods to systematically and consistently collect and analyse information on the price of foods, meals and affordability of diets in different countries globally. Food categories were informed by the Food Standards Australian New Zealand (FSANZ)...

Rates of dispersal of cane toads during their global invasion

Richard Shine, Ross Alford, Ryan Blennerhasset, Gregory Brown, Jayna DeVore, Simon Ducatez, Patrick Finnerty, Matthew Greenlees, Shannon Kaiser, Samantha McCann, Lachlan Pettit, Ligia Pizzatto, Lin Schwarzkopf, Georgia Ward-Fear & Benjamin Phillips
Invasions often accelerate through time, as dispersal-enhancing traits accumulate at the expanding range edge. How does the dispersal behaviour of individual organisms shift to increase rates of population spread? We collate data from 44 radio-tracking studies (in total, of 650 animals) of cane toads (Rhinella marina) to quantify distances moved per day, and the frequency of displacement in their native range (French Guiana) and two invaded areas (Hawai’i and Australia). Here we show that toads...

Re-allocation of nitrogen and phosphorus from roots drives regrowth of grasses and sedges after defoliation under deficit irrigation and nitrogen enrichment

Ruzhen Wang, Tom Cresswell, Mathew Johansen, Jennifer Harrison, Yong Jiang, Claudia Keitel, Timothy Cavagnaro & Feike Dijkstra
1. Re-allocation of nutrients from roots to shoots is essential for plant regrowth in grasslands, particularly in nutrient-poor conditions. However, the response of root nutrient re-allocation to changes in nitrogen (N) and water availability remains largely unknown. 2. Using a novel 15N and 32P labelling technique, we quantified the contribution of N and phosphorus (P) to shoot regrowth from either root re-allocation or direct soil uptake for perennial grasses exposed to high-frequency deficit irrigation (HFDI)...

Host genetics, phenotype and geography structure the microbiome of a foundational seaweed

Georgina Wood, Georgina Wood, Peter Steinberg, Alexandra Campbell, Adriana Verges, Melinda Coleman & Ezequiel Marzinelli
Interactions between hosts and their microbiota are critical to the functioning and resilience of eukaryotic macro-organisms. Critically, for hosts that play foundational roles in communities, understanding what drives these interactions is essential for informing restoration and conservation of entire ecosystems. Here, we investigated the relative influence of host traits and the surrounding environment on microbial communities associated with the foundational seaweed Phyllospora comosa. We collected data on 16 morphological and functional phenotypic traits, host genetics...

Flick SMART multi-catch rodent station and bait station data sets: Council of the city of Sydney, October 2019 to July 2020

Miguel A Bedoya Perez, Michael P Ward, Max Loomes & Mathew S Crowther
Shortly after the enactment of preventative measures aimed at limiting the spread of COVID-19, local governments and public health authorities around the world reported an increased sighting of rats. We combined multi-catch rodent station data, rodent bait stations data, and rodent-related residents’ complaints data to explore the effects that social distancing and lockdown measures might have had on the rodent population within the City of Sydney, Australia. We found that rodent captures, activity, and rodent...

Spatially exlicit capture histories for small mammals and predators in a Tasmanian forest system

Billie Lazenby, Nicholas Mooney & Christopher Dickman
The following data represents three years of capture-recapure records from individually marked co-occurring small mammals and predators from four spatially independent sites situated in cool temperate forests in southern Tasmania, Australia. Data for small mammals was collected for the swamp rat, Rattus lutreolus, and long-tailed mouse, Pseudomys higginsi, using Elliott small mammal live capture and release traps. Data for predators was collected for the Tasmanian devil, Sarcophilus harrisii, and feral cat, Felis catus, using remote...

Secondary predation constrains DNA-based diet reconstruction in two threatened shark species

Mark De Bruyn, Matteo Barbato, Joseph D. DiBattista & Matt K. Broadhurst
Increasing fishing effort, including bycatch and discard practices, are impacting marine biodiversity, particularly among slow-to-reproduce taxa such as elasmobranchs, and specifically sharks. While some fisheries involving sharks are sustainably managed, collateral mortalities continue, contributing towards > 35% of species being threatened with extinction. To effectively manage shark stocks, life-history information, including resource use and feeding ecologies is pivotal, especially among those species with wide-ranging distributions. Two cosmopolitan sharks bycaught off eastern Australia are the common...

Exercise training has morph-specific effects on telomere, body condition and growth dynamics in a color-polymorphic lizard

Christopher Friesen, Wilson Wilson, Nicky Rollings, Joanna Sudyka, Mathieu Giraudeau, Camilla Whittington & Mats Olsson
Alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) are correlated suites of sexually selected traits that are likely to impose differential physiological costs on different individuals. While moderate activity might be beneficial, animals living in the wild often work at the margins of their resources and performance limits. Individuals using ARTs may have divergent capacities for activity. When pushed beyond their respective capacities, they may experience condition loss, oxidative stress, and molecular damage that must be repaired with limited...

Taxonomic revision reveals potential impacts of Black Summer megafires on a cryptic species

Chris Jolly, Harry Moore, Mitchell Cowan, Teigan Cremona, Judy Dunlop, Sarah Legge, Grant Linley, Vivianna Miritis, John Woinarski & Dale Nimmo
Context: Sound taxonomy is the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation. Without a fundamental understanding of species delimitations, as well as their distributions and ecological requirements, our ability to conserve them is drastically impeded. Cryptic species – two or more distinct species currently classified as a single species – present a significant challenge to biodiversity conservation. How do we assess the conservation status and address potential drivers of extinction if we are unaware of a species’ existence?...

Data from: Host provisioning behavior favors mimetic begging calls in a brood-parasitic cowbird

Cynthia A. Ursino, Ros Gloag, Juan C. Reboreda & Maria C. De Mársico
The vocalizations of some young brood-parasitic birds closely resemble those of their host’s young. Such similarities might arise because hosts bestow the greatest parental care in response to their own species’ call type. We used a playback experiment to assess the effectiveness of the nestling call structures of two brood parasites, the specialist screaming cowbird (Molothrus rufoaxillaris) and the generalist shiny cowbird (M. bonariensis), in stimulating parental provisioning in a shared host, the baywing (Agelaioides...

Data from: Impacts of ocean acidification on sea urchin growth across the juvenile to mature adult life-stage transition is mitigated by warming

Symon A. Dworjanyn & Maria Byrne
Understanding how growth trajectories of calcifying invertebrates are affected by changing climate requires acclimation experiments that follow development across life history transitions. In a long-term acclimation study, the effects of increased acidification and temperature on survival and growth of the tropical sea urchin Tripneustes gratilla from the early juvenile (5 mm test diameter- TD) through the developmental transition to the mature adult (60 mm TD) were investigated. Juveniles were reared in a combination of three...

Data from: Unexpected absence of genetic separation of a highly diverse population of hookworms from geographically isolated hosts

Benjamin T. Haynes, Alan D. Marcus, Damien P. Higgins, Jaime Gongora, Rachael Gray & Jan Slapeta
The high natal site fidelity of endangered Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea) along the southern Australian coast suggests that their maternally transmitted parasitic species, such as hookworms, will have restricted potential for dispersal. If this is the case, we would expect to find a hookworm haplotype structure corresponding to that of the host mtDNA haplotype structure; that is, restricted among geographically separated colonies. In this study, we used a fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase...

Data from: MHC class II diversity of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) populations across their range

Damien P. Higgins, Quintin Lau, Weerachai Jaratlerdsiri, Joanna E. Griffith & Jaime Gongora
Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) genes code for proteins that bind and present antigenic peptides and trigger the adaptive immune response. We present a broad geographical study of MHCII DA β1 (DAB) and DB β1 (DBB) variants of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus; n=191) from 12 populations across eastern Australia, with a total of 13 DAB and 7 DBB variants found. We identified greater MHCII variation and, possibly, additional gene copies in koala populations in...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    24
  • 2021
    55
  • 2020
    42
  • 2019
    30
  • 2018
    39
  • 2017
    45
  • 2016
    44
  • 2015
    26
  • 2014
    18
  • 2013
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    356

Affiliations

  • University of Sydney
    356
  • Macquarie University
    26
  • University of Queensland
    24
  • UNSW Sydney
    22
  • University of Melbourne
    19
  • Australian National University
    14
  • Monash University
    14
  • University of Wollongong
    13
  • University of Otago
    10
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    9