5 Works

Modeling management strategies for chronic disease in wildlife: predictions for the control of respiratory disease in bighorn sheep

Kezia Manlove, Emily Almberg, E. Frances Cassirer, Jennifer Ramsey, Keri Carson, Justin Gude & Raina Plowright
1. Controlling persistent infectious disease in wildlife populations is an on-going challenge for wildlife managers and conservationists worldwide. 2. Here, we develop a dynamic pathogen transmission model capturing key features of M. ovipneumoniae infection, a major cause of population declines in North American bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). We explore the effects of model assumptions and parameter values on disease dynamics, including density versus frequency dependent transmission, the inclusion of a carrier class versus a longer...

Wildfire extends the shelf-life of elk nutritional resources regardless of fire severity

Lauren Snobl, Kelly Proffitt & Joshua Millspaugh
Large-scale, high severity wildfires are increasingly frequent across the western United States. Fire severity affects the amount of vegetation removed and helps dictate what, where, and how many plants regenerate postfire, potentially altering the available habitat and nutritional landscape for wildlife. To evaluate the effects of fire severity on summer nutritional resources for elk (Cervus canadensis), we collected field data and remotely sensed information in years two and three after a large-scale wildfire to compare...

Locations of GPS-collared moose and geographic correlates, as well as for random points within study area

Richard Harris, Braden Burkholder, Nicholas DeCesare, Vanna Boccardori & Robert Garrott
Moose are among the many species that are vulnerable to both direcdt and indirect effects of climate change. Habitat selection is one framework to assist investigators in disentangling the various factors (including weather) that ultimately dictate how animals respond to their environment. We investigated patterns of winter habitat selecdtion by adult female moose in southerwestern MOntana, USA, during 2007-2010, and how that selection was affected by snow (quantified by snow water equivalent) and winter temperatures....

Non-invasive monitoring of multiple wildlife health factors by fecal microbiome analysis

Samuel Pannoni, William Holben & Kelly Proffitt
Fecal microbial biomarkers represent a less invasive alternative for acquiring information on wildlife populations than many traditional sampling methodologies. Our goal was to evaluate linkages between fecal microbiome communities in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus canadensis) and four host factors including sex, age, population, and physical condition (body-fat). We paired a feature-selection algorithm with an LDA-classifier trained on elk differential bacterial abundance (16S-rRNA amplicon survey) to predict host health factors from 104 elk microbiomes across four...

Summer elk habitat selection in southwest Montana

Dustin Ranglack, Kelly Proffitt, Jodie Canfield, Justin Gude, Jay Rotella & Robert Garrott
Data used in Ranglack et al. (in review), Modeling broad-scale patterns of elk summer resource selection in Montana using regional and population-specific models. Understanding animal distribution is important for the management of populations and their habitats. Across the western United States, elk (Cervus canadensis) provide important ecological, cultural, and economic benefits and the sound management of their habitats is of vital importance. In western Montana, National Forest lands are managed in part to provide and...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    5

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    5

Affiliations

  • Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks
    5
  • Montana State University
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • Utah State University
    1
  • Agricultural Research Service
    1
  • Idaho Department of Fish and Game
    1
  • University of Nebraska at Kearney
    1