25 Works

Functional constraints during development limit jaw shape evolution in marsupials

Anne-Claire Fabre, Carys Dawling, Roberto Portela Miguez, Vincent Fernandez, Eve Noirault & Anjali Goswami
Differences in jaw function experienced through ontogeny can have striking consequences for evolutionary outcomes, as has been suggested for the major clades of mammals. In contrast to placentals, marsupial newborns have an accelerated development of the head and forelimbs, allowing them to crawl to the mother’s teats to suckle within just a few weeks of conception. The different functional requirements that marsupial newborns experience in early postnatal development have been hypothesized to have constrained their...

Evolution of body size and wing shape trade-offs in arsenurine silkmoths

Chris Hamilton, Nathalie Winiger, Juliette Rubin, Jesse Breinholt, Rodolphe Rougerie, Ian Kitching, Jesse Barber & Akito Kawahara
One of the key objectives in biological research is understanding how evolutionary processes have produced Earth's diversity. A critical step towards revealing these processes is an investigation of evolutionary tradeoffs – that is, the opposing pressures of multiple selective forces. For millennia, nocturnal moths have had to balance successful flight, as they search for mates or host plants, with evading bat predators. However, the potential for evolutionary trade-offs between wing shape and body size are...

Spatial patterns of phylogenetic diversity and endemism in the Western Ghats, India: a case study using ancient predatory arthropods

D. K. Bharti, Greg Edgecombe, Praveen Karanth & Jahnavi Joshi
The Western Ghats (WG) mountain chain in peninsular India is a global biodiversity hotspot, one in which patterns of phylogenetic diversity and endemism remain to be documented across taxa. We used a well-characterized community of ancient soil predatory arthropods from the WG to understand diversity gradients, identify hotspots of endemism and conservation importance, and highlight poorly-studied areas with unique biodiversity. We compiled an occurrence dataset for 19 species of scolopendrid centipedes, which was used to...

A broadly resolved molecular phylogeny of New Zealand cheilostome bryozoans as a framework for hypotheses of morphological evolution

Russell Orr, E. Di Martino, D.P. Gordon, M.H. Ramsfjell, H.L. Mello, A.M. Smith & L.H. Liow
Larger and larger molecular phylogenies based on ever more genes are becoming commonplace with the advent of cheaper and more streamlined sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines. However, many groups of inconspicuous but no less evolutionarily or ecologically important marine invertebrates are still neglected in the quest for understanding species- and higher-level phylogenetic relationships using high-throughput sequencing approaches. Here, we alleviate this issue by presenting a 17 gene phylogeny of >200 newly sequenced cheilostome bryozoan species, mainly...

Eggs of extinct dwarf island emus retained large-size: Electronic supplementary material

Julian Hume & Christian Robertson
Islands off southern Australia once harboured three subspecies of the mainland emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), the smaller Tasmanian emu (D. n. diemenensis), and two dwarf emus, King Island emu (D. n. minor) and Kangaroo Island emu (D. n. baudinianus), which all became extinct rapidly after discovery by human settlers. Little was recorded about their life histories and only a few historical museum specimens exist, including a number of complete eggs from Tasmania and a unique egg...

On defining and finding islands of trees and mitigating large island bias

Ana Serra Silva & Mark Wilkinson
How best can we summarise sets of phylogenetic trees? Systematists have relied heavily on consensus methods, but if tree distributions can be partitioned into distinct subsets it may be helpful to provide separate summaries of these rather than relying entirely upon a single consensus tree. How sets of trees can most helpfully be partitioned and represented leads to many open questions, but one natural partitioning is provided by the islands of trees found during tree...

Ecomorphological variation in Trithemis (Odonata, Libellulidae) dragonfly wings reconsidered

Norman MacLeod, Banjamin Price & Zachary Stevens
In the analysis and interpretation of organismal morphology it is important to take a number of factors into consideration. The phylogenetic ecology of the Afro-Asian dragonfly genus Trithemis has been investigated by Damm et al. [1] and Trithemis wing ecomorphology by Outomuro et al. [2]. However, the latter study focused exclusively on a somewhat coarse sampling of forewing and hindwing outlines and reported results that were at odds in some ways with expectations given the...

Community metabarcoding reveals the relative role of environmental filtering and spatial processes in metacommunity dynamics of soil microarthropods across a mosaic of montane forests

Víctor Noguerales, Emmanouil Meramveliotakis, Adrián Castro-Insua, Carmelo Andújar, Paula Arribas, Thomas Creedy, Isaac Overcast, Hélène Morlon, Brent C. Emerson, Alfried P. Vogler & Anna Papadopoulou
Disentangling the relative role of environmental filtering and spatial processes in driving metacommunity structure across mountainous regions remains challenging, as the way we quantify spatial connectivity in topographically and environmentally heterogeneous landscapes can influence our perception of which process predominates. More empirical datasets are required to account for taxon- and context-dependency but relevant research in understudied areas is often compromised by the taxonomic impediment. We here employed haplotype-level community DNA metabarcoding, enabled by stringent filtering...

Microsatellite genotypes of the freshwater bryozoan species Cristatella mucedo and Fredericella sultana

P Ruggeri & B Okamura
This dataset contains genotypes (in three digit-format) for unique clones of the freshwater bryozoan species Cristatella mucedo and Fredericella sultana at microsatellite loci and representing sampling sites across the UK. Cristatella mucedo data additionally covers Northern Ireland.

Evolutionary modularity, integration and disparity in an accretionary skeleton: Analysis of venerid Bivalvia

Stewart Edie, Safia Khouja, Katie Collins, Nicholas Crouch & David Jablonski
Modular evolution, the relatively independent evolution of body parts, may promote high morphological disparity in a clade. Conversely, integrated evolution via the stronger covariation of parts may limit disparity. However, integration can also promote high disparity by channeling morphological evolution along lines of least resistance—a process that may be particularly important in the accumulation of disparity among organisms with accretionary growth, as in many invertebrate systems. We use a time-calibrated phylogenetic hypothesis and high-density, 3D...

Data from: Reliable wolf-dog hybrid detection in Europe using a reduced SNP panel developed for non-invasively collected samples

Jenni Harmoinen, Alina Von Thaden, Jouni Aspi, Laura Kvist, Berardino Cocchiararo, Anne Jarausch, Andrea Gazzola, Teodora Sin, Hannes Lohi, Marjo Hytönen, Ilpo Kojola, Astrid Vik Stronen, Romolo Caniglia, Federica Mattucci, Marco Galaverni, Raquel Godinho, Aritz Ruiz-González, Ettore Randi, Violeta Muñoz-Fuentes & Carsten Nowak
Background: Understanding the processes that lead to hybridization of wolves and dogs is of scientific and management importance, particularly over large geographical scales, as wolves can disperse great distances. However, a method to efficiently detect hybrids in routine wolf monitoring is lacking. Microsatellites offer only limited resolution due to the low number of markers showing distinctive allele frequencies between wolves and dogs. Moreover, calibration across laboratories is time-consuming and costly. In this study, we selected...

Dataset for: A robust, semi-automated approach for counting cementum increments imaged with X-ray computed tomography

Elis Newham, Pamela G. Gill, Kate Robson Brown, Neil Gostling, Ian Corfe & Philipp Schneider
Data of manuscript A robust, semi-automated approach for counting cementum increments imaged with X-ray computed tomography in PloS One.

A reassessment of the enigmatic diapsid Paliguana whitei and the early history of Lepidosauromorpha

David Paul Ford, Susan Evans, Jonah Choiniere, Vincent Fernandez & Roger Benson
Lepidosaurs include lizards, snakes, amphisbaenians and the tuatara, comprising a highly speciose evolutionary radiation with widely varying anatomical traits. Their stem-lineage originated by the late middle Permian 259 million years ago, but its early fossil record is poorly documented, obscuring the origins of key anatomical and functional traits of the group. Paliguana whitei, from the Early Triassic of South Africa, is an enigmatic fossil species with potential to provide information on this. However, its anatomy...

Supplemental Material for \"Biomechanical analyses of Cambrian euarthropod limbs reveal their effectiveness in mastication and durophagy\"

Russell Bicknell, James Holmes, Gregory Edgecombe, Sarah Losso, Javier Ortega-Hernández, Stephen Wroe & John Paterson
Durophagy arose in the Cambrian and greatly influenced the diversification of biomineralised defensive structures throughout the Phanerozoic. Spinose gnathobases on protopodites of Cambrian euarthropod limbs are considered key innovations for shell-crushing, yet few studies have demonstrated their effectiveness with biomechanical models. Here we present finite element analysis models of two Cambrian trilobites with prominent gnathobases—Redlichia rex and Olenoides serratus—and compare these to the protopodites of the Cambrian euarthropod Sidneyia inexpectans and the modern American horseshoe...

An integrated phylogenetic reassessment of the parasitoid superfamily Platygastroidea (Hymenoptera: Proctotrupomorpha) results in a revised familial classification

Chen Huayan, Lahey Zachary, Elijah J. Talamas, Alejandro A. Valerio, Ovidiu A. Popovici, Luciana Musetti, Hans Klompen, Andrew Polaszek, Lubomír Masner, Andrew D. Austin & Norman F. Johnson
The superfamily Platygastroidea (Hymenoptera: Proctotrupomorpha) is a diverse group of parasitoid wasps that attack nine orders of insects as well as spiders. They appear to show a clear pattern of host group specificity among genera. A robust phylogeny is essential to understanding the monophyly of and relationships among lower level groups and the pattern of the shifts among host groups. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of Platygastroidea based on four molecular markers (18S, 28S, COI, and...

Calibrating phylogenies assuming bifurcation or budding alters inferred macroevolutionary dynamics in a densely sampled phylogeny of bivalve families

Nicholas Crouch, Stewart Edie, Katie Collins, Rüdiger Bieler & David Jablonski
Analyses of evolutionary dynamics can be profoundly affected by age calibrations of phylogenetic nodes under different models of lineage branching. Most time-calibrated molecular phylogenies of extant taxa assume a purely bifurcating model, where nodes are calibrated using the daughter lineage with the older first occurrence in the fossil record. Lineages can also split via budding, in which a parent lineage persists following the origin of a daughter lineage, and nodes are calibrated using the age...

Micro CT Images of Sellafield Borehole 13B

Ryan Payton, Brett Clark & Mark Fellgett
These images were acquired using micro computed tomographic imaging of 7 sandstone plugs taken at various depths in the Sellafield borehole 13B. SF696 (63.8 m), SF697 (76.1 m), SF698 (96.98 m), SF699 (126.27 m), SF700 (144.03 m), SF701 (172.16 m) and SF702 (181.39 m). These samples are further detailed and analysed in the following article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1144/petgeo2020-092

Micro CT Images of Borehole GGC01

Ryan Payton, Brett Clark & Mark Fellgett
These images were acquired using micro computed tomographic imaging of 4 sandstone plugs taken at various depths in the Glasgow UKGEOS borehole GGC01. GG496 (170.07 m), GG497 (168.66 m), GG498 (73.37 m) and GG499 (135.06 m). These samples are further detailed and analysed in the following article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1144/petgeo2020-092.

The first Silurian trilobite with three-dimensionally preserved soft parts reveals novel appendage morphology

Mark Sutton, Derek Siveter, Richard Fortey, Derek Briggs & David Siveter
The first Silurian trilobite known with soft parts preserved, a Dalmanites species, is described from the Herefordshire Lagerstätte. Biramous appendages and much of the alimentary system are evident. High-fidelity three-dimensional preservation reveals a novel, double arrangement of the exopod filaments, interconnected by a presumed membranous sheet. This morphology explains a misinterpretation of the exopod as supporting spiral structures, originally reported nearly 150 years ago. The new exopod morphology is considered primarily respiratory in function and...

Hearing from the ocean and into the river: The evolution of the inner ear of Platanistoidea (Cetacea, Odontoceti)

Mariana Viglino, Maximiliano Gaetán, Mónica R. Buono, R. Ewan Fordyce & Travis Park
The inner ear of the two higher clades of modern cetaceans (Neoceti) is highly adapted for hearing infrasonic (mysticetes) or ultrasonic (odontocetes) frequencies. Within odontocetes, Platanistoidea comprises a single extant riverine representative, Platanista gangetica, and a diversity of mainly extinct marine species from the late Oligocene onward. Recent studies, drawing on features including the disparate tympanoperiotic, have not yet provided a consensus phylogenetic hypothesis for platanistoids. Further, cochlear morphology and evolutionary patterns have never been...

Evolution, diversity, and disparity of the tiger shark lineage Galeocerdo in deep time

Julia Türtscher, Faviel A. López-Romero, Patrick L. Jambura, René Kindlimann, David J. Ward & Jürgen Kriwet
Sharks have a long and rich fossil record that consists predominantly of isolated teeth due to the poorly mineralized cartilaginous skeleton. Tiger sharks (Galeocerdo), which represent apex predators in modern oceans, have a known fossil record extending back into the early Eocene (ca. 56 Ma) and comprise 22 recognised extinct and one extant species to date. However, many of the fossil species remain dubious, resulting in a still unresolved evolutionary history of the tiger shark...

Data for butterfly near-infrared adaptation research

Changku Kang, Sehyuk Lim, Won Young Lee, Yunji Choi, Devi Stuart-Fox & Blanca Huertas
Climatic gradients frequently predict large-scale ecogeographical patterns in animal coloration, but the underlying causes are often difficult to disentangle. We examined ecogeographical patterns of reflectance among 343 European butterfly species and isolated the role of selection for thermal benefits by comparing animal-visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavebands. NIR light accounts for ~50% of solar energy but cannot be seen by animals so functions primarily in thermal control. We found that reflectance of both dorsal and ventral...

Data from: Integrated population models poorly estimate the demographic contribution of immigration

Matthieu Paquet, Jonas Knape, Debora Arlt, Pär Forslund, Tomas Pärt, Øystein Flagstad, Carl G. Jones, Malcolm A. C. Nicoll, Ken Norris, Josephine M. Pemberton, Håkan Sand, Linn Svensson, Vikash Tatayah, Petter Wabakken, Camilla Wikenros, Mikael Åkesson & Matthew Low
Estimating the contribution of demographic parameters to changes in population growth is essential for understanding why populations fluctuate. Integrated Population Models (IPMs) offer a possibility to estimate contributions of additional demographic parameters, for which no data have been explicitly collected: typically immigration. Such parametersare often subsequently highlighted as important drivers of population growth. Yet, accuracy in estimating their temporal variation, and consequently their contribution to changes in population growth rate, has not been investigated. To...

Data from: Wintering bird communities are tracking climate change faster than breeding communities

Aleksi Lehikoinen, Åke Lindström, Andrea Santangeli, Päivi Sirkiä, Lluis Brotons, Vincent Devictor, Jaanus Elts, Ruud P. B. Fobben, Henning Heldbjerg, Sergi Herrando, Marc Herremans, Marie-Anne R. Hudson, Frederic Jiguet, Alison Johnston, Romain Lorrilliere, Emma-Liina Marjakangas, Nicole L. Michel, Charlotte M. Moshøj, Renno Nellis, Jean-Yves Paquet, Adam C. Smith, Tibor Szep & Chris Van Turnhout
1. Global climate change is driving species’ distributions towards the poles and mountain tops during both non-breeding and breeding seasons, leading to changes in the composition of natural communities. However, the degree of season differences in climate-driven community shifts has not been thoroughly investigated at large spatial scales. 2. We compared the rates of change in the community composition during both winter (non-breeding season) and summer (breeding) and their relation to temperature changes. 3. Based...

Supplementary information for: A biased fossil record can preserve reliable phylogenetic signal

C. Henrik Woolley, Jeffrey Thompson, Yun-Hsin Wu, David Bottjer & Nathan Smith
Abstract.­­––The fossil record is notoriously imperfect and biased in representation, hindering our ability to place fossil specimens into an evolutionary context. For groups with fossil records mostly consisting of disarticulated parts (e.g., vertebrates, echinoderms, plants), the limited morphological information preserved sparks concerns about whether fossils retain reliable evidence of phylogenetic relationships, and lends uncertainty to analyses of diversification, paleobiogeography, and biostratigraphy in Earth history. To address whether a fragmentary past can be trusted, we need...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    25

Affiliations

  • Natural History Museum
    24
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • University of Otago
    2
  • Smithsonian Institution
    2
  • University of Chicago
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • Imperial College London
    2
  • British Geological Survey
    2
  • Royal Holloway University of London
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1