3 Works

Data from: Social behaviours and networks of vervet monkeys are influenced by gastrointestinal parasites

Colin A. Chapman, Sagan Friant, Kathleen Godfrey, Cynthia Liu, Dipto Sarkar, Valérie A. M. Schoof, Raja Sengupta, Dennis Twinomugisha, Kim Valenta, Tony L. Goldberg & Dipto Sakar
Substantial research has shown that while some parasite infections can be fatal to hosts, most infections are sub-clinical and non-lethal. Such sub-clinical infections can nonetheless have negative consequences for the long-term fitness of the host such as reducing juvenile growth and the host’s ability to compete for food and mates. With such effects, infected individuals are expected to exhibit behavioural changes. Here we use a parasite removal experiment to quantify how gastrointestinal parasite infections affect...

Data from: Prescription of antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety: a cross-sectional survey in the private sector in Uganda

Anthony K. Mbonye, Esther Buregyeya, Elizeus Rutebemberwa, Sian E. Clarke, Sham Lal, Kristian S. Hansen, Pascal Magnussen & Philip LaRussa
Objectives: The main objective of this study was to assess antibiotic prescription practices at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the private health sector in Uganda. Methods: A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono district, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables:...

Data from: A transmission-virulence evolutionary trade-off explains attenuation of HIV-1 in Uganda

François Blanquart, Mary Kate Grabowski, Joshua Herbeck, Fred Nalugoda, David Serwadda, Michael A. Eller, Merlin L. Robb, Ronald Gray, Godfrey Kigozi, Oliver Laeyendecker, Katrina A. Lythgoe, Gertrude Nakigozi, Thomas C. Quinn, Steven J. Reynolds, Maria J. Wawer & Christophe Fraser
Evolutionary theory hypothesizes that intermediate virulence maximizes pathogen fitness as a result of a trade-off between virulence and transmission, but empirical evidence remains scarce. We bridge this gap using data from a large and long-standing HIV-1 prospective cohort, in Uganda. We use an epidemiological-evolutionary model parameterised with this data to derive evolutionary predictions based on analysis and detailed individual-based simulations. We robustly predict stabilising selection towards a low level of virulence, and rapid attenuation of...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Makerere University
    3
  • London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • Johns Hopkins University
    1
  • Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
    1
  • National Institutes of Health
    1
  • McGill University
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1
  • Rakai Health Sciences Program
    1