280 Works

Data from: Developmental plasticity evolved according to specialist–generalist trade-offs in experimental populations of Drosophila melanogaster

Jacqueline Le Vinh Thuy, John M. Vandenbrooks & Michael J. Angilletta
We studied the evolution of developmental plasticity in populations of Drosophila melanogaster that evolved at either constant or fluctuating temperatures. Consistent with theory, genotypes that evolved at a constant 16°C or 25°C performed best when raised and tested at that temperature. Genotypes that evolved at fluctuating temperatures performed well at either temperature, but only when raised and tested at the same temperature. Our results confirm evolutionary patterns predicted by theory, including a loss of plasticity...

Data from: Persistent anthrax as a major driver of wildlife mortality in a tropical rainforest

Constanze Hoffmann, Fee Zimmermann, Roman Biek, Hjalmar Kuehl, Kathrin Nowak, Roger Mundry, Anthony Agbor, Samuel Angedakin, Mimi Arandjelovic, Anja Blankenburg, Gregory Brazolla, Katherine Corogenes, Emmanuel Couacy-Hymann, Tobias Deschner, Paula Dieguez, Karsten Dierks, Ariane Düx, Susann Dupke, Henk Eshuis, Pierre Formenty, Yisa Ginath Yuh, Annemarie Goedmakers, Jan Gogarten, Anne-Céline Granjon, Scott McGraw … & Fabian Leendertz
Anthrax is a globally significant animal disease and zoonosis. Despite this, current knowledge of anthrax ecology is largely limited to arid ecosystems, where outbreaks are most commonly reported. We reveal cryptic the dynamics of an anthrax causing agent, Bacillus cereus biovar anthracis, in a tropical rainforest with severe consequences for local wildlife communities. Using data and samples collected over three decades we found that rainforest anthrax is a persistent and widespread cause of death for...

Data from: Carotenoid coloration is related to fat digestion efficiency in a wild bird

Christina Madonia, Pierce Hutton, Mathieu Giraudeau & Tuul Sepp
Some of the most spectacular visual signals found in the animal kingdom are based on dietarily derived carotenoid pigments (which cannot be produced de novo), with a general assumption that carotenoids are limited resources for wild organisms, causing trade-offs in allocation of carotenoids to different physiological functions and ornamentation. This resource trade-off view has been recently questioned, since the efficiency of carotenoid processing may relax the trade-off between allocation toward condition or ornamentation. This hypothesis...

Data from: Skill not athleticism predicts individual variation in match performance of soccer players

Robbie S. Wilson, Gwendolyn K. David, Sean C. Murphy, , Amanda C. Niehaus, Andrew H. Hunter, Michelle D. Smith & Michael J. Angilletta
Just as evolutionary biologists endeavor to link phenotypes to fitness, sport scientists try to identify traits that determine athlete success. Both disciplines would benefit from collaboration, and to illustrate this, we used an analytical approach common to evolutionary biology to isolate the phenotypes that promote success in soccer, a complex activity of humans played in nearly every modern society. Using path analysis, we quantified the relationships among morphology, balance, skill, athleticism, and performance of soccer...

Transcriptomic characteristics of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in COVID-19 patients

Yong Xiong, Yuan Liu, Liu Cao, Dehe Wang, Ming Guo, Ao Jiang, Dong Guo, Wenjia Hu, Jiayi Yang, Zhidong Tang, Honglong Wu, Yongquan Lin, Meiyuan Zhang, Qi Zhang, Mang Shi, Yingle Liu, Yu Zhou, Ke Lan & Yu Chen
Circulating in China and 158 other countries and areas, the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak has caused devastating mortality and posed a great threat to public health. However, efforts to identify effectively supportive therapeutic drugs and treatments has been hampered by our limited understanding of host immune response for this fatal disease. To characterize the transcriptional signatures of host inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 (HCoV-19) infection, we carried out transcriptome sequencing of the RNAs isolated from the bronchoalveolar...

Data from: Frequent misdirected courtship in a natural community of colorful Habronattus jumping spiders

Lisa A. Taylor, Erin C. Powell & Kevin J. McGraw
Male courtship display is common in many animals; in some cases, males engage in courtship indiscriminately, spending significant time and energy courting heterospecifics with whom they have no chance of mating or producing viable offspring. Due to high costs and few if any benefits, we might expect mechanisms to evolve to reduce such misdirected courtship (or ‘reproductive interference’). In Habronattus jumping spiders, males frequently court heterospecifics with whom they do not mate or hybridize; females...

Data from: Predicting functional responses in agro-ecosystems from animal movement data to improve management of invasive pests

Mark Wilber, Sarah Chinn, James Beasley, Raoul Boughton, Ryan Brook, Stephen Ditchkoff, Justin Fischer, Steve Hartley, Lindsey Holstrom, John Kilgo, Jesse Lewis, Ryan Miller, Nathan Snow, Kurt VerCauteren, Samantha Wisely, Colleen Webb & Kim Pepin
Functional responses describe how changing resource availability affects consumer resource use, thus providing a mechanistic approach to prediction of the invasibility and potential damage of invasive alien species (IAS). However, functional responses can be context-dependent, varying with resource characteristics and availability, consumer attributes, and environmental variables. Identifying context-dependencies can allow invasion and damage risk to be predicted across different ecoregions. Understanding how ecological factors shape the functional response in agro-ecosystems can improve predictions of hotspots...

Catchment properties and the photosynthetic trait composition of freshwater plant communities

Lars Lønsmann Iversen, A. Winkel, L. Baastrup-Spohr, A. B. Hinke, J. Alahuhta, A. Baattrup-Pedersen, S. Birk, P. Brodersen, P. A. Chambers, F. Ecke, T. Feldmann, D. Gebler, J. Heino, T. S. Jespersen, S. J. Moe, T. Riis, L. Sass, O. Vestergaard, S. C. Maberly, K. Sand-Jensen & O. Pedersen
Unlike in land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to carbon dioxide (CO2) to compensate for the low diffusivity and potential depletion of CO2 in water. Concentrations of bicarbonate and CO2 vary greatly with catchment geology. In this study, we investigate whether there is a link between these concentrations and the frequency of freshwater plants possessing the bicarbonate use trait. We show, globally, that the frequency of plant species with...

Microbial colonization of microplastics in the Caribbean Sea

Kassandra Dudek, Bianca Cruz, Beth Polidoro & Susanne Neuer
Microplastics in the ocean function as an artificial microbial reef, with unique and diverse communities of eukaryotic and bacterial microbiota colonizing its surface. It is not well understood if the communities in this biofilm, also termed “plastisphere”, are specific for the type of microplastic on which they develop. Here, we carried out a controlled 6-week long in situ incubation experiment of six common plastic polymer in Bocas del Toro, Panama. The community composition of prokaryotes...

Data from: Colder environments did not select for a faster metabolism during experimental evolution of Drosophila melanogaster

Lesley A. Alton, Catriona Condon, Craig Robert White & Michael J. Angilletta
The effect of temperature on the evolution of metabolism has been the subject of debate for a century; however, no consistent patterns have emerged from comparisons of metabolic rate within and among species living at different temperatures. We used experimental evolution to determine how metabolism evolves in populations of Drosophila melanogaster exposed to one of three selective treatments: a constant 16°C, a constant 25°C, or temporal fluctuations between 16 and 25°C. We tested August Krogh's...

Defining Relictual Biodiversity: Conservation Units in Speckled Dace (Leuciscidae: Rhinichthys osculus) of the Greater Death Valley Ecosystem

Steven Mussmann, Marlis Douglas, David Oakey & Michael Douglas
The tips in the tree of life serve as foci for conservation and management, yet clear delimitations are masked by inherent variance at the species-population interface. Analyses using thousands of nuclear loci can potentially sort inconsistencies, yet standard categories applied to this parsing are themselves potentially conflicting and/or subjective [e.g., DPS (distinct population segments); DUs (Diagnosable Units-Canada); MUs (management units); SSP (subspecies); ESUs (Evolutionarily Significant Units); UIEUs (uniquely identified evolutionary units)]. One potential solution for...

Data from: Gut microbiome critically impacts PCB-induced changes in metabolic fingerprints and the hepatic transcriptome in mice

Joe Lim, Julia Cui, Xueshu Li, Hans-Joachim Lehmler, Dongfang Wang & Haiwei Gu
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitously detected in the environment and have been linked to metabolic diseases. The liver serves as a central hub for the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites. Gut dysbiosis is recognized as a critical regulator of disease susceptibility, however, little is known regarding how PCBs and gut microbiome interact to modulate the interface between xenobiotic and intermediary metabolism. We hypothesized that the gut microbiome regulates PCBs-mediated changes in the metabolic fingerprints...

Data from: Testosterone regulates CYP2J19-linked carotenoid signal expression in male red-backed fairywrens (Malurus melanocephalus)

Sarah Khalil, Joseph Welklin, Kevin McGraw, Jordan Boersma, Hubert Schwabl, Michael Webster & Jordan Karubian
Carotenoid pigments produce most red, orange, and yellow colours in vertebrates. This coloration can serve as an honest signal of quality that mediates social and mating interactions, but our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that control carotenoid signal production, including how different physiological pathways interact to shape and maintain these signals, remains incomplete. We investigated the role of testosterone in mediating gene expression associated with a red plumage sexual signal in red-backed fairywrens (Malurus melanocephalus)....

Termite males enhance mating encounters by changing speed according to density

Nobuaki Mizumoto, Arturo Rizo, Stephen Pratt & Thomas Chouvenc
Search theory predicts that animals evolve efficient movement patterns to enhance encounter rates with specific targets. The optimal movements vary with the surrounding environments, which may explain the observation that animals often switch their movement patterns depending on conditions. However, the effectiveness of behavioral change during search is rarely evaluated because it is difficult to examine the actual encounter dynamics. Here we studied how partner-seeking termites update their search strategies depending on the local densities...

Tsimane physiological dysregulation data

Thomas Kraft, Jonathan Stieglitz, Benjamin Trumble, Angela Garcia, Hillard Kaplan & Michael Gurven
Humans have the longest post-reproductive lifespans and lowest rates of actuarial aging among primates. Understanding the links between slow actuarial aging and physiological change is critical for improving the human “healthspan”. Physiological dysregulation may be a key feature of aging in industrialized populations with high burdens of chronic “diseases of civilization”, but little is known about age trajectories of physiological condition in subsistence populations with limited access to public health infrastructure. To better characterize human...

Seminal fluid protein divergence among populations exhibiting postmating prezygotic reproductive isolation

Martin Garlovsky, Caroline Evans, Matthew A. Rosenow, Timothy L. Karr & Rhonda R. Snook
Despite holding a central role for fertilisation success, reproductive traits often show elevated rates of evolution and diversification. The rapid evolution of seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) within populations is predicted to cause mis-signalling between the male ejaculate and female reproductive tract between populations resulting in postmating prezygotic (PMPZ) isolation. Crosses between populations of Drosophila montana show PMPZ isolation in the form of reduced fertilisation success in both noncompetitive and competitive contexts. Here we test whether...

Data from: Two ways to display: male hummingbirds show different color-display tactics based on sun orientation

Richard K. Simpson & Kevin J. McGraw
Animals exhibit a diversity of ornaments and courtship behaviors, which often co-occur and are used for communication. The sensory drive hypothesis states that these traits evolved and vary due to interactions with each other, the environment, and signal receiver. However, interactions between colorful ornaments and courtship behaviors, specifically in relation to environmental variation, remain poorly understood. We studied male iridescent plumage (gorgets), display behavior, and sun orientation during courtship flights (shuttle displays) in broad-tailed hummingbirds...

Adaptive trait syndromes along multiple economic spectra define cold and warm adapted ecotypes in a widely distributed foundation tree species

Davis Blasini, Dan Koepke, Kevin Grady, Gerard Allan, Catherine Gehring, Samuel A. Cushman, Thomas Whitham & Kevin Hultine
1. The coordination of traits from individual organs to whole plants is under strong selection because of environmental constraints on resource acquisition and use. However, the tight coordination of traits may provide underlying mechanisms of how locally adapted plant populations can become maladapted because of climate change. 2. To better understand local adaptation in intraspecific trait coordination, we studied trait variability in the widely distributed foundation tree species, Populus fremontii using a common garden near...

Data from: Structural and defensive roles of angiosperm leaf venation network reticulation across an Andes-Amazon elevation gradient

Benjamin Blonder, Norma Salinas, Lisa Patrick Bentley, Alexander Shenkin, Percy Orlando Chambi Porroa, Yolvi Valdez Tejeira, Tatiana Erika Boza Espinoza, Gregory R. Goldsmith, Lucas Enrico, Roberta Martin, Gregory P. Asner, Sandra Díaz, Brian J. Enquist & Yadvinder Malhi
1.The network of minor veins of angiosperm leaves may include loops (reticulation). Variation in network architecture has been hypothesized to have hydraulic and also structural and defensive functions. 2.We measured venation network trait space in eight dimensions for 136 biomass-dominant angiosperm tree species along a 3,300 m elevation gradient in southeastern Peru. We then examined the relative importance of multiple ecological, and evolutionary predictors of reticulation. 3.Variation in minor venation network reticulation was constrained to...

Data from: Age-specific patterns of maternal investment in common gull egg yolk

Janek Urvik, Kalev Rattiste, Mathieu Giraudeau, Monika Okuliarova, Peeter Horak & Tuul Sepp
While the general patterns of age-specific changes in reproductive success are quite well established in long-lived animals, we still do not know if allocation patterns of maternally-transmitted compounds are related to maternal age. We measured yolk testosterone, carotenoids and vitamins A and E levels in a population of known-aged common gulls (Larus canus) and found an age-specific pattern in yolk lutein and vitamin A concentrations. Middle-aged mothers allocated more of these substances to yolk compared...

Data from: The shortfall of sociality: group-living affects hunting performance of individual social spiders

Gyan Harwood & Leticia Avilés
Ineffective hunters in cooperative foraging groups may be shielded from natural selection by their more effective group mates, whereas those living solitarily would starve and thus be removed from the population. The problem may be exacerbated in large groups where it may be easier for individuals to withhold participation. Group foragers may thus be ineffective individual hunters or exhibit greater inter-individual variation in hunting abilities, in particular when living in large groups. We test these...

Data from: Expression of and choice for condition-dependent carotenoid-based color in an urbanizing context

Mathieu Giraudeau, Matthew B. Toomey, Pierce Hutton & Kevin J. McGraw
Urban environments create a unique suite of conditions, leading to changes in animal behavior, morphology, phenology or physiology. Condition-dependent traits such as the carotenoid-based coloration offer a unique opportunity to assess the impacts of urbanization on organisms because they reflect the nutrition, health or other resource-based attributes of their bearers and they play an essential role in intra- and inter-sex interactions. To determine if and how the carotenoid-based coloration of male house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus)...

Data from: Self-deception in nonhuman animals: weak crayfish escalated aggression as if they were strong

Michael Angilletta, Gregory Kubitz & Robbie Wilson
Humans routinely deceive themselves when communicating to others, but no one knows whether other animals do the same. We ask whether dishonest signaling between crayfish meets a condition required for self-deception: dishonest individuals and honest individuals escalate aggression according to their signals of strength rather than actual strength. Using game theory, we predicted how an animal’s knowledge of its strength should affect its decision to escalate aggression. At the evolutionary equilibrium, an animal that knows...

GARD 1.5 range shapefiles used in: Global diversity patterns are explained by diversification rates at ancient, not shallow, timescales

Uri Roll, Shai Meiri, Maxwell Farrell, Jonathan Davies, John Gittleman, John Wiens & Patrick Stephens
Explaining global species richness patterns is a “Holy Grail” of ecology and evolution. These richness patterns are often attributed to spatial variation in diversification rates (speciation minus extinction). Surprisingly, prominent studies of birds, fish, and angiosperms reported higher diversification rates at higher latitudes (mismatched with richness). Yet these studies only examined diversification rates at relatively recent timescales. Here, we quantify global richness patterns among lizard and snake species (10,213; 94%) and explore their underlying causes....

Coordination of movement via complementary interactions of leaders and followers in termite mating pairs.

Nobuaki Mizumoto, Sang-Bin Lee, Gabriele Valentini, Thomas Chouvenc & Stephen Pratt
Leadership of animal group movements depends on social feedback, hence leader’s signals and follower’s responses should be attuned to each other. However, leader and follower roles are difficult to disentangle in species with high levels of coordination. To overcome this challenge, we investigated a simple case of movement coordination: termite pairs in which a female leads a male as they search for a nest site. To tease apart leader and follower roles, we created conspecific...

Registration Year

  • 2023
    9
  • 2022
    66
  • 2021
    34
  • 2020
    49
  • 2019
    23
  • 2018
    31
  • 2017
    21
  • 2016
    14
  • 2015
    12
  • 2014
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    280

Affiliations

  • Arizona State University
    280
  • Jilin University
    40
  • Shanghai Jiao Tong University
    40
  • Huazhong Agricultural University
    35
  • Southern Medical University
    34
  • Capital Medical University
    32
  • Beijing University of Chinese Medicine
    29
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    25
  • Wuhan University
    25
  • Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College
    22