12 Works

Data from: Postglacial recolonisation in a cold climate specialist in Western Europe: patterns of genetic diversity in the adder (Vipera berus) support the central-marginal hypothesis

Sylvain Ursenbacher, Michaël Guillon, Hervé Cubizolle, Andréaz Dupoué, Gabriel Blouin-Demers & Olivier Lourdais
Understanding the impact of postglacial recolonization on genetic diversity is essential in explaining current patterns of genetic variation. The central–marginal hypothesis (CMH) predicts a reduction in genetic diversity from the core of the distribution to peripheral populations, as well as reduced connectivity between peripheral populations. While the CMH has received considerable empirical support, its broad applicability is still debated and alternative hypotheses predict different spatial patterns of genetic diversity. Using microsatellite markers, we analysed the...

Data from: Social learning and the replication process: an experimental investigation

Maxime Derex, Romain Feron, Bernard Godelle & Michel Raymond
Human cultural traits typically result from a gradual process that has been described as analogous to biological evolution. This observation has led pioneering scholars to draw inspiration from population genetics to develop a rigorous and successful theoretical framework of cultural evolution. Social learning, the mechanism allowing information to be transmitted between individuals, has thus been described as a simple replication mechanism. Although useful, the extent to which this idealization appropriately describes the actual social learning...

Data from: Geographically contrasting biodiversity reductions in a widespread New Zealand seabird

Nicolas J. Rawlence, Martyn Kennedy, Christian N. K. Anderson, Stefan Prost, Charlotte E. Till, Ian Smith, R. Paul Scofield, Alan J. D. Tennyson, Jill Hamel, Chris Lalas, Elizabeth A. Matisoo-Smith, Jonathan M. Waters & Ian W. G. Smith
Unravelling prehistoric anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity represents a key challenge for biologists and archaeologists. New Zealand's endemic Stewart Island Shag (Leucocarbo chalconotus) comprises two distinct phylogeographic lineages, currently restricted to the country's south and southeast. However, fossil and archaeological remains suggest a far more widespread distribution at the time of Polynesian settlement ca. 1280 AD, encompassing much of coastal South Island. We used modern and ancient DNA, radiocarbon dating, and Bayesian modelling, to assess the...

Data from: Oxygen supply limits the heat tolerance of lizard embryos

Colton Smith, Rory S. Telemeco, Michael J. Angilletta & John M. VandenBrooks
The mechanisms that set the thermal limits to life remain uncertain. Classically, researchers thought that heating kills by disrupting the structures of proteins or membranes, but an alternative hypothesis focuses on the demand for oxygen relative to its supply. We evaluated this alternative hypothesis by comparing the lethal temperature for lizard embryos developing at oxygen concentrations of 10–30%. Embryos exposed to normoxia and hyperoxia survived to higher temperatures than those exposed to hypoxia, suggesting that...

Data from: Keeping the band together: evidence for false boundary disruptive coloration in a butterfly

Brett M. Seymoure & Annette Aiello
There is a recent surge of evidence supporting disruptive coloration, in which patterns break up the animal's outline through false edges or boundaries, increasing survival in animals by reducing predator detection and/or preventing recognition. Though research has demonstrated that false edges are successful for reducing predation of prey, research into the role of internal false boundaries (i.e., stripes and bands) in reducing predation remains warranted. Many animals, have stripes and bands that may function disruptively....

Data from: Assessing models of speciation under different biogeographic scenarios; an empirical study using multi-locus and RNA-seq analyses

Taylor Edwards, Marc Tollis, PingHsun Hsieh, Ryan N. Gutenkunst, Zhen Liu, Kenro Kusumi, Melanie Culver & Robert W. Murphy
Evolutionary biology often seeks to decipher the drivers of speciation, and much debate persists over the relative importance of isolation and gene flow in the formation of new species. Genetic studies of closely related species can assess if gene flow was present during speciation, because signatures of past introgression often persist in the genome. We test hypotheses on which mechanisms of speciation drove diversity among three distinct lineages of desert tortoise in the genus Gopherus....

Data from: Herbivory and competition of Tibetan steppe vegetation in winter pasture: effects of livestock exclosure and plateau pika reduction

Richard B. Harris, Wenying Wang, , Andrew T. Smith, Donald J. Bedunah, Wang Wenying &
Rangeland degradation has been identified as a serious concern in alpine regions of western China on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau (QTP). Numerous government-sponsored programs have been initiated, including many that feature long-term grazing prohibitions and some that call for eliminating pastoralism altogether. As well, government programs have long favored eliminating plateau pikas (Ochotona curzoniae), assumed to contribute to degraded conditions. However, vegetation on the QTP evolved in the presence of herbivory, suggesting that deleterious effects from...

Data from: Thermoregulatory behavior limits local adaptation of thermal niches and confers sensitivity to climate change

Lauren B. Buckley, Joseph C. Ehrenberger, & Michael J. Angilletta
1. Thermoregulation buffers environmental variation, which enables a species to persist during climate change but ultimately hinders adaptation of thermal tolerance by weakening selective pressure. 2. We used a model of optimal thermal physiology to demonstrate how thermoregulatory behaviour limits local adaptation of thermal physiology in a widespread group of lizards, the Sceloporus undulatus complex. 3. Empirical data for seven populations demonstrates conservatism of thermal tolerance, consistent with the model's prediction in the case of...

Data from: The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organisation

Ben M. Sadd, Seth M. Barribeau, Guy Bloch, Dirk C. De Graaf, Peter Dearden, Christine Elsik, Jurgen Gadau, Cornelius Grimmelikhuijzen, Martin Hasselmann, Jeffrey Lozier, Hugh Robertson, Guy Smagghe, Eckart Stolle, Matthias Van Vaerenbergh, Robert Waterhouse, Erich Bornberg-Bauer, Steffan Klasberg, Anna Bennett, Francisco Camara, Roderic Guigo, Katharina Hoff, Marco Mariotti, Monica Munos-Torres, Terence Murphy, Didac Santesmasses … & Kim C. Worley
Background: The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats. Results: We report the high quality draft genome...

Data from: Semi-permeable species boundaries in Iberian barbels (Barbus and Luciobarbus, Cyprinidae)

Hugo F. Gante, Ignacio Doadrio, Maria Judite Alves & Thomas E. Dowling
Background: The evolution of species boundaries and the relative impact of selection and gene flow on genomic divergence are best studied in populations and species pairs exhibiting various levels of divergence along the speciation continuum. We studied species boundaries in Iberian barbels, Barbus and Luciobarbus, a system of populations and species spanning a wide degree of genetic relatedness, as well as geographic distribution and range overlap. We jointly analyze multiple types of molecular markers and...

Data from: Phylogenetic revision of Minyomerus Horn, 1876 sec. Jansen & Franz, 2015 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) using taxonomic concept annotations and alignments

Michael Andrew Jansen & Nico M. Franz
This contribution adopts the taxonomic concept annotation and alignment approach. Accordingly, and where indicated, previous and newly inferred meanings of taxonomic names are individuated according to one specific source. Articulations among these concepts and pairwise, logically consistent alignments of original and revisionary classifications are also provided, in addition to conventional nomenclatural provenance information. A phylogenetic revision of the broad-nosed weevil genera Minyomerus Horn, 1876 sec. O’Brien & Wibmer (1982), and Piscatopus Sleeper, 1960 sec. O’Brien...

Data from: Regional variation in Caribbean dry forest tree species composition

Janet Franklin, Julie Ripplinger, Ethan H. Freid, Humfredo Marcano-Vega & David W. Steadman
How does tree species composition vary in relation to geographical and environmental gradients in a globally rare tropical/subtropical broadleaf dry forest community in the Caribbean? We analyzed data from 153 Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), along with 42 plots that we sampled in the Bahamian Archipelago (on Abaco and Eleuthera Islands). FIA data were collected using published protocols. In the Bahamian Archipelago, we recorded terrain...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Arizona State University
    12
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Otago
    2
  • Federal Institute of São Paulo
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • University of Hohenheim
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • Indiana State University
    1
  • University of California System
    1