3 Works

Data from: Patterns of frugivory in the columnar cactus Pilosocereus leucocephalus

Shamira Vázquez-Castillo, Antonio Miranda-Jácome & Ernesto Ruelas Inzunza
In the frugivory networks of many arid and semi-arid Mesoamerican ecosystems, columnar cacti act as keystone species that produce fruits with a high content of water and nutrients attractive to numerous vertebrates. The aim of this investigation was to assess the fruit removal patterns of two guilds of frugivores on the fruits of the woolly torch Pilosocereus leucocephalus. We assessed fruit pulp removal in two ways: by estimating the consumption of seeds given the amount...

Data from: Quantifying uncertainty due to fission-fusion dynamics as a component of social complexity

Gabriel Ramos-Fernandez, Andrew J. King, Jacinta C. Beehner, Thore J. Bergman, Margaret C. Crofoot, Anthony Di Fiore, Julia Lehmann, Colleen M. Schaffner, Noah Snyder-Mackler, Klaus Zuberbühler, Filippo Aureli & Denis Boyer
Groups of animals (including humans) may show flexible grouping patterns, in which temporary aggregations or subgroups come together and split, changing composition over short temporal scales, i.e. fission and fusion). A high degree of fission-fusion dynamics may constrain the regulation of social relationships, introducing uncertainty in interactions between group members. Here we use Shannon's entropy to quantify the predictability of subgroup composition for three species known to differ in the way their subgroups come together...

Data from: Males, but not females, perform strategic mate searching movements between host plants in a leaf beetle with scramble competition polygyny

Danilo G. Muniz, Martha L. Baena, Rogélio Macías-Ordóñez & Glauco Machado
1. Mate searching is assumed to be performed mostly by males, but when females benefit from multiple mating or are under risk of failing to mate, they may also perform mate searching. This is especially important in scramble competition polygynies, in which mate searching is the main mechanism of mate competition. Typically, more mobile individuals are expected to achieve higher mating success because mobility increases their probability of finding mates. 2. If we assume individual...

Registration Year

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  • Universidad Veracruzana
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  • University of Washington
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  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
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  • University of St Andrews
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  • University of Sao Paulo
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  • Instituto Politécnico Nacional
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