3 Works

The SONOZOTZ project: assembling an echolocation calls library for bats in a megadiverse country

MARIA MAC SWINEY, JORGE ORTEGA, RAFAEL AVILA-FLORES, PEDRO ADRIÁN AGUILAR-RODRÍGUEZ, VERONICA ZAMORA-GUTIERREZ, Luis Gerardo Avila-Torresagatón, JORGE AYALA-BERDON, BEATRIZ BOLIVAR-CIME, MIGUEL BRIONES-SALAS, PEDRO ADRIÁN AGUILAR-RODRIGUEZ, MARTIN ALARCON-MONTANO, LUIS GERARDO AVILA-TORRESAGATON, MARTHA CHAN-NOH, MANUEL CHAVEZ-CAUICH, CUAUHTEMOC CHAVEZ, PATRICIA CORTES-CALVA, JUAN CRUZADO, JESUS CARLO CUEVAS, MELINA DEL REAL-MONROY, CYNTHIA ELIZALDE-ARELLANO, MARGARITA GARCIA-LUIS, RODRIGO GARCIA-MORALES, JOSE ANTONIO GUERRERO, ALDO A. GUEVARA-CARRIZALES, LUIS ARTURO HERNANDEZ-MIJANGOS … & ALBA Z. RODAS-MARTINEZ
Bat acoustic libraries are important tools that assemble echolocation calls to allow the comparison and discrimination to confirm species identifications. The Sonozotz project represents the first nation-wide library of bat echolocation calls for a megadiverse country. It was assembled following a standardized recording protocol that aimed to cover different recording habitats, recording techniques, and call variation inherent to individuals. The Sonozotz project included 69 species of echolocating bats, a high species richness that represents 50%...

Data from: Differential impact of severe drought on infant mortality in two sympatric neotropical primates

Fernando Campos, Urs Kalbitzer, Amanda Melin, Jeremy Hogan, Saul Cheves, Evin Murillo-Chacon, Adrián Guadamuz, Monica Myers, Colleen Schaffner, Katharine Jack, Filippo Aureli & Linda Fedigan
Extreme climate events can have important consequences for the dynamics of natural populations, and severe droughts are predicted to become more common and intense due to climate change. We analysed infant mortality in relation to drought in two primate species (white-faced capuchins, Cebus capucinus imitator, and Geoffroy's spider monkeys, Ateles geoffroyi) in a tropical dry forest in north-western Costa Rica. Our survival analyses combine several rare and valuable long-term data sets, including long-term primate life-history,...

A catastrophic tropical drought kills hydraulically vulnerable tree species

Jennifer Powers, German Vargas-G, Timothy Brodribb, Naomi Schwartz, Daniel Perez-Aviles, Chris Smith-Martin, Justin Becknell, Filippo Aureli, Roger Blanco, Erick Calderón-Morales, Julio César Calvo-Alvarado, Ana Julieta Calvo-Obando, María Marta Chavarría, Dorian Carvajal-Vanegas, César Dionisio Jiménez-Rodríguez, Evin Murillo Chacon, Colleen Schaffner, Leland Werden, Xiangtao Xu & David Medvigy
Drought-related tree mortality is now a widespread phenomenon predicted to increase in magnitude with climate change. However, the patterns of which species and trees are most vulnerable to drought, and the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive, in part due to the lack of relevant data and difficulty of predicting the location of catastrophic drought years in advance. We used long‐term demographic records and extensive databases of functional traits and distribution patterns to understand the responses...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Universidad Veracruzana
    3
  • Colby College
    1
  • University of Notre Dame
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity
    1
  • The University of Texas at San Antonio
    1
  • Autonomous University of Zacatecas
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • McGill University
    1
  • Autonomous University of Campeche
    1