6 Works

Data from: Landscape composition, configuration, and trophic interactions shape arthropod communities in rice agroecosystems

Christophe Dominik, Ralf Seppelt, Finbarr G. Horgan, Josef Settele & Tomáš Václavík
1. Increasing landscape heterogeneity of agroecosystems can enhance natural enemy populations and promote biological control. However, little is known about the multi-scale effects of landscape heterogeneity on arthropod communities in rice agroecosystems, especially in combination with trophic interactions. 2. We examined for the first time how landscape heterogeneity, measured by four independent metrics of landscape composition and configuration at three spatial scales, affected species abundance and species richness of rice arthropods within four functional groups...

Data from: Mapping phosphorus hotspots in Sydney’s organic wastes: a spatially-explicit inventory to facilitate urban phosphorus recycling

Genevieve S. Metson, Dana Cordell, Brad Ridoutt & Steve Mohr
Phosphorus is an essential element for food production whose main global sources are becoming scarce and expensive. Furthermore, losses of phosphorus throughout the food production chain can also cause serious aquatic pollution. Recycling urban organic waste resources high in phosphorus could simultaneously address scarcity concerns for agricultural producers who reply on phosphorus fertilisers, and waste managers seeking to divert waste from landfills to decrease environmental burdens. Recycling phosphorus back to agricultural lands however requires careful...

Data from: Age‐dependent leaf physiology and consequences for crown‐scale carbon uptake during the dry season in an Amazon evergreen forest

Loren P. Albert, Jin Wu, Neill Prohaska, Plinio Barbosa De Camargo, Travis E. Huxman, Edgard S. Tribuzy, Valeriy Y. Ivanov, Rafael S. Oliveira, Sabrina Garcia, Marielle N. Smith, Raimundo Cosme Oliveira Junior, Natalia Restrepo-Coupe, Rodrigo Da Silva, Scott C. Stark, Giordane A. Martins, Deliane V. Penha & Scott R. Saleska
* Satellite and tower-based metrics of forest-scale photosynthesis generally increase with dry season progression across central Amazônia, but the underlying mechanisms lack consensus. * We conducted demographic surveys of leaf age composition, and measured age-dependence of leaf physiology in broadleaf canopy trees of abundant species at a central eastern Amazon site. Using a novel leaf-to-branch scaling approach, we used this data to independently test the much-debated hypothesis—arising from satellite and tower-based observations—that leaf phenology could...

Data from: Effects of macrophytes on lake‐water quality across latitudes: a meta‐analysis

Yiluan Song, Jia Huan Liew, Darren Zong Han Sim, Maxine Allayne Darlene Mowe, Simon Mark Mitrovic, Hugh Tiang Wah Tan & Darren Chong Jinn Yeo
Macrophytes are widely recognized for improving water quality and stabilizing the desirable clear‐water state in lakes. The positive effects of macrophytes on water quality have been noted to be weaker in the (sub)tropics compared to those of temperate regions. We conducted a global meta‐analysis using 47 studies that met our set criteria to assess the overall effects of macrophytes on water quality (measured by phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentration, total nitrogen concentration, total phosphorus concentration, Secchi...

Data from: Good parenting may not increase reproductive success under environmental extremes

Rebecca J. Fox, Megan L. Head & Iain Barber
For species exhibiting parental care, the way in which parents adjust care behaviour to compensate for environmental change potentially influences offspring survival and, ultimately, population viability. Using the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) – a species in which males provide parental care by building and tending a nest and fanning the eggs – we examined how low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels affect paternal care, embryo development and survival. While levels of nest tending were unaffected by...

Data from: The perils of paradise: an endangered species conserved on an island loses antipredator behaviours within 13 generations

Christopher J. Jolly, Jonathan K. Webb, Ben L. Phillips & Chris J. Jolly
When imperilled by a threatening process, the choice is often made to conserve threatened species on offshore islands that typically lack the full suite of mainland predators. Whilst keeping the species extant, this releases the conserved population from predator-driven natural selection. Antipredator traits are no longer maintained by natural selection and may be lost. It is implicitly assumed that such trait loss will happen slowly, but there are few empirical tests. In Australia, northern quolls...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of Technology Sydney
    6
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • University of the Free State
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • Australian National University
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    1
  • National University of Singapore
    1
  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    1
  • University of Sao Paulo
    1