275 Works

Data from: Botfly infections impair the aerobic performance and survival of montane populations of deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus rufinus

Luke R. Wilde, Cole J. Wolf, Stephanie M. Poerter, Maria Stager, Zachary A. Cheviron, Nathan R. Senner & Stephanie M. Porter
1. Elevations >2000 m represent consistently harsh environments for small endotherms because of abiotic stressors such as cold temperatures and hypoxia. 2. These environmental stressors may limit the ability of populations living at these elevations to respond to biotic selection pressures — such as parasites or pathogens — that in other environmental contexts would impose only minimal energetic- and fitness-related costs. 3. We studied deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus rufinus) living along two elevational transects (2300...

Data from: Transmission pathways and spillover of an erythrocytic bacterial pathogen from domestic cats to wild felids

Annie Kellner, Scott Carver, Valeria Scorza, Clifton D. McKee, Michael Lappin, Kevin R. Crooks, Sue VandeWoude & Michael F. Antolin
Many pathogens infect multiple hosts, and spillover from domestic to wild species poses a significant risk for spread of diseases that threaten wildlife and humans. Documentation of cross-species transmission, and unravelling the mechanisms that drive it, remains a challenge. Focusing on co-occurring domestic and wild felids, we evaluate possible transmission mechanisms and evidence of spillover of ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ (CMhm), an erythrocytic bacterial parasite of cats. We examine transmission and possibility of spillover by analysing...

Data from: Seasonal climate effects on the survival of a hibernating mammal

Caylee A. Falvo, David N. Koons & Lise M. Aubry
Global climate change and associated regional climate variability is impacting the phenology of many species, ultimately altering individual fitness and population dynamics. Yet, few studies have considered the effects of pertinent seasonal climate variability on phenology and fitness. Hibernators may be particularly susceptible to changes in seasonal climate since they have a relatively short active season in which to reproduce and gain enough mass to survive the following winter. To understand whether and how seasonal...

Data from: Functional outcomes of mutualistic network interactions: a community-scale study of frugivore gut passage on germination

Evan C. Fricke, John Bender, Evan M. Rehm & Haldre S. Rogers
1. Current understanding of mutualistic networks is grounded largely in data on interaction frequency, yet mutualistic network dynamics are also shaped by interaction quality—the functional outcomes of individual interactions on reproduction and survival. The difficulty of obtaining data on functional outcomes has resulted in limited understanding of functional variation among a network’s pairwise species interactions, of the study designs that are necessary to capture major sources of functional variation, and of predictors of functional variation...

Data from: Interacting effects of unobserved heterogeneity and individual stochasticity in the life-history of the Southern fulmar

Stéphanie Jenouvrier, Lise M. Aubry, Christophe Barbraud, Henri Weimerskirch & Hal Caswell
1.Individuals are heterogeneous in many ways. Some of these differences are incorporated as individual states (e.g., age, size, breeding status) in population models. However, substantial amounts of heterogeneity may remain unaccounted for, due to unmeasurable genetic, maternal, or environmental factors. 2.Such unobserved heterogeneity (UH) affects the behavior of heterogeneous cohorts via intra-cohort selection and contributes to inter-individual variance in demographic outcomes such as longevity and lifetime reproduction. Variance is also produced by individual stochasticity, due...

Data from: Circadian rhythms vary over the growing season and correlate with fitness components

Matthew J. Rubin, Marcus T. Brock, Amanda M. Davis, Zachary M. German, Mary Knapp, Stephen M. Welch, Stacey L. Harmer, Julin N. Maloof, Seth J. Davis & Cynthia Weinig
Circadian clocks have evolved independently in all three domains of life, suggesting that internal mechanisms of time-keeping are adaptive in contemporary populations. However, the performance consequences of either discrete or quantitative clock variation have rarely been tested in field settings. Clock sensitivity of diverse segregating lines to the environment remains uncharacterized as do the statistical genetic parameters that determine evolutionary potential. In field studies with Arabidopsis thaliana, we found that major perturbations to circadian cycle...

Data from: Drosophila studies support a role for a presynaptic synaptotagmin mutation in a human congenital myasthenic syndrome

Mallory C. Shields, Matthew R. Bowers, McKenzie M. Fulcer, Madelyn K. Bollig, Patrick J. Rock, Bryan R. Sutton, Alysia D. Vrailas-Mortimer, Hanns Lochmüller, Roger G. Whittaker, Rita Horvath & Noreen E. Reist
During chemical transmission, the function of synaptic proteins must be coordinated to efficiently release neurotransmitter. Synaptotagmin 2, the Ca2+ sensor for fast, synchronized neurotransmitter release at the human neuromuscular junction, has recently been implicated in a dominantly inherited congenital myasthenic syndrome associated with a non-progressive motor neuropathy. In one family, a proline residue within the C2B Ca2+-binding pocket of synaptotagmin is replaced by a leucine. The functional significance of this residue has not been investigated...

Data from: Endemic chronic wasting disease causes mule deer population decline in Wyoming

Melia T. DeVivo, David R. Edmunds, Matthew J. Kauffman, Brant A. Schumaker, Justin Binfet, Terry J. Kreeger, Bryan J. Richards, Hermann M. Schätzl & Todd E. Cornish
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), and moose (Alces alces shirasi) in North America. In southeastern Wyoming average annual CWD prevalence in mule deer exceeds 20% and appears to contribute to regional population declines. We determined the effect of CWD on mule deer demography using age-specific, female-only, CWD transition matrix models to estimate the population growth...

Data from: Evaluating the impact of domestication and captivity on the horse gut microbiome

Jessica L. Metcalf, Se Jin Song, James T. Morton, Sophie Weiss, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Frédéric Joly, Claudia Feh, Pierre Taberlet, Eric Coissac, Amnon Amir, Eske Willerslev, Rob Knight, Valerie McKenzie & Ludovic Orlando
The mammal gut microbiome, which includes host microbes and their respective genes, is now recognized as an essential second genome that provides critical functions to the host. In humans, studies have revealed that lifestyle strongly influences the composition and diversity of the gastrointestinal microbiome. We hypothesized that these trends in humans may be paralleled in mammals subjected to anthropogenic forces such as domestication and captivity, in which diets and natural life histories are often greatly...

Data from: Extreme site fidelity as an optimal strategy in an unpredictable and homogeneous environment

Brian D. Gerber, Mevin B. Hooten, Christopher P. Peck, Mindy B. Rice, James H. Gammonley, Anthony D. Apa & Amy J. Davis
1. Animal site fidelity structures space-use, population demography, and ultimately gene flow. Understanding the adaptive selection for site fidelity patterns provides a mechanistic understanding to both spatial and population processes. This can be achieved by linking space-use with environmental variability (spatial and temporal) and demographic parameters. However, rarely is the environmental context that drives the selection for site fidelity behavior fully considered. 2. We use ecological theory to understand whether the spatial and temporal variability...

Data from: Host-adapted aphid populations differ in their migratory patterns and capacity to colonize crops

Sanford D. Eigenbrode, Thomas S. Davis, Jennifer R. Adams, Lisette P. Waits, David Hawthorne & Damon S. Husebye
Although phytophagous insects can vary genetically in host use and exhibit long-range movements, the combined implications of these phenomena for pest management have received limited attention. To address this, we surveyed the genetic diversity of pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum using twelve microsatellite loci and assessed host association patterns and annual movement from a putative source region (Columbia River Basin) to the Palouse region of northern Idaho and western Washington, where the aphid is a pest...

Data from: Adaptation to warmer climates by parallel functional evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

J. Grey Monroe, Cullen McGovern, Jesse R. Lasky, Kelsi Grogan, James Beck & John K. McKay
The evolutionary processes and genetics underlying local adaptation at a specieswide level are largely unknown. Recent work has indicated that a frameshift mutation in a member of a family of transcription factors, C-repeat binding factors or CBFs, underlies local adaptation and freezing tolerance divergence between two European populations of Arabidopsis thaliana. To ask whether the specieswide evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis is consistent with local adaptation, we surveyed CBF variation from 477 wild accessions...

Data from: Different clades and traits yield similar grassland functional responses

Elisabeth J. Forrestel, Michael J. Donoghue, Erika J. Edwards, Walter Jetz, Justin C. O. Du Toit & Melinda D. Smith
Plant functional traits are viewed as key to predicting important ecosystem and community properties across resource gradients within and among biogeographic regions. Vegetation dynamics and ecosystem processes, such as aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), are increasingly being modeled as a function of the quantitative traits of species, which are used as proxies for photosynthetic rates, and nutrient and water-use efficiency. These approaches rely on an assumption that a certain trait value consistently confers a specific...

Data from: Population- and species-based variation of webworm-parasitoid interactions in hogweeds (Heracelum spp.) in the Netherlands

Jeffrey Harvey, Rieta Gols & Paul Ode
In three Dutch populations of the native small hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), and one of the invasive giant hogweed (H. mantegazzianum), interactions between a specialist herbivore, the parsnip webworm (Depressaria radiella), and its associated parasitoids were compared during a single growing season. We found plant population and/or host plant species-related differences in the abundance of moth pupae, the specialist polyembryonic endoparasitoid, Copidosoma sosares, the specialist pupal parasitoid, Barichneumon heracliana, and a potential hyperparasitoid of C. sosares,...

North Pacific harbor porpoise SNP and microhaplotype genotypes, mitochondrial control region haplotype sequences

Phillip Morin, Brenna Forester, Karin Forney, Carla Crossman, Brittany Hancock-Hanser, Kelly Robertson, Lance Barrett-Lennard, Robin Baird, John Calambokidis, Pat Gearin, Bradley Hanson, Cassie Schumacher, Timothy Harkins, Michael Fontaine, Barbara Taylor & Kim Parsons
Harbor porpoises in the North Pacific are found in coastal waters from southern California to Japan, but population structure is poorly known outside of a few local areas. We used multiplexed amplicon sequencing of 292 loci and genotyped clusters of SNPs as microhaplotypes (N=271 samples) in addition to mtDNA sequence data (N=413 samples), to examine the genetic structure from samples collected along the Pacific coast and inland waterways from California to southern British Columbia. We...

An island-hopping bird reveals how founder events shape genome-wide divergence

Ashley Sendell-Price, Kristen Ruegg, Bruce Robertson & Sonya Clegg
When populations colonise new areas, both strong selection and strong drift can be experienced due to novel environments and small founding populations, respectively. Empirical studies have predominantly focused on the phenotype when assessing the role of selection, and limited neutral-loci when assessing founder-induced loss of diversity. Consequently, the extent to which processes interact to influence evolutionary trajectories is difficult to assess. Genomic-level approaches provide the opportunity to simultaneously consider these processes. Here, we examine the...

Data from: Infection prevalence and density of a pathogenic trematode parasite decrease with stream order along a river continuum

Landon Falke & Daniel Preston
In lotic ecosystems, the River Continuum Concept (RCC) provides a framework for understanding changes in environmental factors and free-living communities, yet how parasite populations shift along river continua remains less clear. We quantified infections by a pathogenic trematode parasite (Nanophyetus salmincola) in >14,000 host snails across 130 stream reaches spanning 165 km in the Willamette River Basin in western Oregon, USA. Environmental factors – including flow volume, temperature, benthic algae, canopy cover, woody debris, and...

Genotyping-by-sequencing data for a Haitian sorghum breeding program

Geoffrey Morris, Terry Felderhoff, Noah Winans, Rachel Walstead, Jean Rigaud Charles, Gael Pressoir & Kebede Muleta
Rapid environmental change can lead to extinction of populations or evolutionary rescue via genetic adaptation. In the past several years, smallholder and commercial cultivation of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a global cereal and forage crop, has been threatened by a global outbreak of an aggressive new biotype of sugarcane aphid (SCA; Melanaphis sacchari). Here we characterized genomic signatures of adaptation in a Haitian sorghum breeding population, which had been recently founded from admixed global germplasm, extensively...

Mast seeding records in North American Pinaceae and summer temperature data (1960-2014)

Jalene LaMontagne, Miranda Redmond, Andreas Wion & David Greene
Mast seeding database compilation for conifer tree reproduction in North America (belonging to genus: Abies, Picea, Pinus, Tsuga). All data included in analyses met the criteria that they: i) had at least 6 years of mast seeding data for a species of coniferous tree in North America, ii) data were collected on a continuous scale (e.g., based on seed traps, visual cone counts, or cone scars), iii) occurred between 1960-2014, and iv) for a taxon...

Adaptation and correlated fitness responses over two time scales in Drosophila suzukii populations evolving in different environments

Laure Olazcuaga, Julien Foucaud, Mathieu Gautier, Candice Deschamps, Anne Loiseau, Nicolas Leménager, Benoit Facon, Virginie Ravigné, Ruth A. Hufbauer, Arnaud Estoup & Nicolas O. Rode
The process of local adaptation involves differential changes in fitness over time across different environments. While experimental evolution studies have extensively tested for patterns of local adaptation at a single time point, there is relatively little research that examines fitness more than once during the time course of adaptation. We allowed replicate populations of the fruit pest Drosophila suzukii to evolve in one of eight different fruit media. After five generations, populations with the highest...

Discharge and suspended sediment a paired watershed study examining the effects of contemporary forest harvesting in the Oregon Coast Range

Jeff Hatten, Catalina Segura, Kevin Bladon, Cody Hale, George G. Ice & John Stednick
Forest harvesting practices can expose mineral soils, decrease infiltration capacities of soils, disturb the stream bank and channel, and increase erosion and fine sediment supply to stream channels. To reduce nonpoint source sediment pollution associated with forest management activities and to maintain the high water quality typically provided from forests, best management practices (BMPs) were developed and implemented. The Alsea Watershed Study was an important early research site that lead to the development of contemporary...

Cameron Pass NASA SnowEx - Meadow TLS U-077 PS01 SV05

DANIEL MCGRATH & Keith Williams

Horizontal gene transfer is the main driver of antimicrobial resistance in broiler chicks infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg

Adelumola Oladeinde, Zaid Abdo, Maximilian Press, Kimberly Cook, Nelson Cox, Benjamin Zwirzitz, Reed Woyda, Steven Lakin, , Torey Looft, Douglas Cosby, , Jean Guard, Eric Line, Michael Rothrock, Mark Berrang, Kyler Herrington, Gregory Zock, Jodie Plumblee Lawrence, Denice Cudnik, Sandra House, Kimberly Ingram, Leah Lariscy, Robert Wagner, Samuel Aggrey … & Casey Ritz
Overuse and misuse of antibiotics in clinical settings and in food production have been linked to the increased prevalence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AR). Consequently, public health and consumer concerns have resulted in a remarkable reduction in antibiotics used for food animal production. However, there are no data on the effectiveness of antibiotic removal in reducing AR shared through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In this study, we used neonatal broiler chicks and Salmonella enterica...

Predator-prey interactions of terrestrial invertebrates are determined by predator body size and species identity

Ana Miller-Ter Kuile, Austen Apigo, An Bui, Bartholomew DiFiore, Elizabeth Forbes, Michelle Lee, Devyn Orr, Daniel Preston, Rachel Behm, Taylor Bogar, Jasmine Childress, Rodolfo Dirzo, Maggie Klope, Kevin Lafferty, John McLaughlin, Marisa Morse, Carina Motta, Kevin Park, Katherine Plummer, David Weber, Ronald Young & Hillary Young
Predator-prey interactions shape ecosystem and can help maintain biodiversity. However, for many of the earth’s most biodiverse and abundant organisms, including terrestrial arthropods, these interactions are difficult or impossible to observe directly with traditional approaches. Based on previous theory, it is likely that predator-prey interactions for these organisms are shaped by a combination of predator traits, including body size and species-specific hunting strategies. In this study, we combined diet DNA metabarcoding data of 173 individual...

Channel Islands song sparrow (Melospiza melodia) landscape genomics and adaptation to climate with gene flow dataset

Maybellene Gamboa
Disentangling the effects of neutral and adaptive processes in maintaining phenotypic variation across environmental gradients is challenging in natural populations. Song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) on the California Channel Islands occupy a pronounced east-west climate gradient within a small spatial extent, providing a unique opportunity to examine the interaction of genetic isolation (gene flow) and the environment (selection) in driving variation. We used reduced representation genomic libraries to infer the role of neutral processes (drift and...

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