14 Works

Metal and metalloid concentrations in the livers of Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) from England and Wales

L.A. Walker, A.J. Lawlor, E.A. Chadwick, E.D. Potter, M.G Pereira, R.F. Shore & J.S. Chaplow
Dataset includes dry weight concentrations of 18 toxic, essential and trace elements quantified in the livers of otters that have been found dead in England and Wales between 2007 and 2009 inclusive. For each otter the month and year found, age, sex, body condition coefficient and location where the otter was found are given. Most elements were measured in 157 samples that came from the years 2007 to 2009. Residues of Pb were only measured...

Data from: Do differences in food web structure between organic and conventional farms affect the ecosystem service of pest control?

Sarina Macfadyen, Rachel Gibson, Andrew Polaszek, Rebecca J. Morris, Paul G. Craze, Robert Planqué, William O.C. Symondson & Jane Memmott
While many studies have demonstrated that organic farms support greater levels of biodiversity, it is not known whether this translates into better provision of ecosystem services. Here we use a food-web approach to analyse the community structure and function at the whole-farm scale. Quantitative food webs from 10 replicate pairs of organic and conventional farms showed that organic farms have significantly more species at three trophic levels (plant, herbivore and parasitoid) and significantly different network...

Data from: Environmental and genetic control of brain and song structure in the zebra finch

Joseph Luke Woodgate, Katherine L. Buchanan, Andrew T. D. Bennett, Clive K. Catchpole, Roswitha Brighton, Stefan Leitner & Andrew T.D. Bennett
Birdsong is a classic example of a learned trait with cultural inheritance, with selection acting on trait expression. To understand how song responds to selection, it is vital to determine the extent to which variation in song learning and neuroanatomy is attributable to genetic variation, environmental conditions, or their interactions. Using a partial cross fostering design with an experimental stressor, we quantified the heritability of song structure and key brain nuclei in the song control...

Data from: Resource partitioning by insectivorous bats in Jamaica

Matthew A. Emrich, Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Susan E. Koenig & Melville Brock Fenton
In this investigation, we use variation in wing morphology, echolocation behaviour, patterns of habitat use and molecular diet analysis to demonstrate that six species of sympatric insectivorous bats in Jamaica show significant differences that could explain resource partitioning among the species. High-intensity echolocating species that used shorter, broadband signals and had shorter, broader wings (Pteronotus macleayii, Pteronotus quadridens, Mormoops blainvillii) foraged most in edge habitats, but differed in timing of peak activity. P. macleayii and...

Data from: The diet of Myotis lucifugus across Canada: assessing foraging quality and diet variability

Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Hugh Broders, François Fabianek, Erin E. Frazer, Alistair MacKenzie, Andrew Boughen, Rachel Hamilton, Craig K. R. Willis, Felix Martinez-Nuñez, Allyson K. Menzies, Kaleigh J. O. Norquay, Mark Brigham, Joseph Poissant, Jody Rintoul, Robert M. R. Barclay, Jesika P. Reimer & Erin E. Fraser
Variation in prey resources influences the diet and behaviour of predators. When prey become limiting, predators may travel farther to find preferred food or adjust to existing local resources. When predators are habitat limited, local resource abundance impacts foraging success. We analysed the diet of Myotis lucifugus (little brown bats) from Nova Scotia (eastern Canada) to the Northwest Territories (north-western Canada). This distribution includes extremes of season length and temperature and encompasses colonies on rural...

Data from: Mitochondrial introgressive hybridization following a demographic expansion in the tomato frogs of Madagascar, genus Dyscophus

Pablo Orozco-TerWengel, Franco Andreone, & Miguel Vences
Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot with a unique fauna and flora largely endemic at the species level and highly threatened by habitat destruction. The processes underlying population-level differentiation in Madagascar's biota are poorly understood and have been proposed to be related to Pleistocene climatic cycles, yet the levels of genetic divergence observed are often suggestive of ancient events. We combined molecular markers of different variability to assess the phylogeography of Madagascar's emblematic tomato frogs (Dyscophus...

Data from: The genetic legacy of the 19th century decline of the British polecat: evidence for extensive introgression from feral ferrets

Mafalda Costa, Carlos Fernandes, Johnny D. S. Birks, Andrew C. Kitchener, Margarida Santos-Reis & Mike W. Bruford
In the 19th century, the British polecat suffered a demographic contraction, as a consequence of direct persecution, reaching its lowest population in the years that preceded the First World War. The polecat is now recovering and expanding throughout Britain, but introgressive hybridization with feral ferrets has been reported, which could be masking the true range of the polecat and introducing domestic genes into the species. We used a fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region...

Data from: Living on a volcano's edge: genetic isolation of an extremophile terrestrial metazoan

Luis Cunha, Rafael Montiel, Marta Novo, Pablo Orozco-TerWengel, Armindo Rodrigues, A. J. Morgan & Peter Kille
Communities of organisms inhabiting extreme terrestrial environments provide a unique opportunity to study evolutionary forces that drive population structure and genetic diversity under the combined challenges posed by multiple geogenic stressors. High abundance of an invasive pantropical earthworm (and the absence of indigenous lumbricid species) in the Furnas geothermal field (Sao Miguel Island, Azores) indicates its remarkable tolerance to high soil temperature, exceptionally high carbon dioxide and low oxygen levels, and elevated metal bioavailability, conditions...

Data from: Endemic infection reduces transmission potential of an epidemic parasite during co-infection

Joanna Randall, Joanne Cable, Irina A. Guschina, John L. Harwood & Joanne Lello
Endemic, low-virulence parasitic infections are common in nature. Such infections may deplete host resources, which in turn could affect the reproduction of other parasites during co-infection. We aimed to determine whether the reproduction, and therefore transmission potential, of an epidemic parasite was limited by energy costs imposed on the host by an endemic infection. Total lipids, triacylglycerols (TAG) and polar lipids were measured in cockroaches (Blattella germanica) that were fed ad libitum, starved or infected...

Data from: Adaptive evolution during an ongoing range expansion: the invasive bank vole (Myodes glareolus) in Ireland.

Thomas A. White, Sarah E. Perkins, Gerald Heckel & Jeremy B. Searle
Range expansions are extremely common, but have only recently begun to attract attention in terms of their genetic consequences. As populations expand, demes at the wave front experience strong genetic drift, which is expected to reduce genetic diversity and potentially cause 'allele surfing', where alleles may become fixed over a wide geographic area even if their effects are deleterious. Previous simulation models show that range expansions can generate very strong selective gradients on dispersal, reproduction,...

Data from: An integrative approach to detect subtle trophic niche differentiation in the sympatric trawling bat species Myotis dasycneme and Myotis daubentonii

Frauke Krüger, Elizabeth L. Clare, Stefan Greif, Bjoern M. Siemers, William O. C. Symondson & Robert S. Sommer
Bats are well known for species richness and ecological diversity thus they provide a good opportunity to study relationships and interaction between species. To assess interactions we consider distinct traits which are likely to be triggered by niche shape and evolutionary processes. We present data on the trophic niche differentiation between two sympatric European trawling bat species, Myotis dasycneme and M. daubentonii, incorporating a wide spectrum of methodological approaches. We measure morphological traits involved in...

Data from: Diet of the insectivorous bat Pipistrellus nathusii during autumn migration and summer residence

Frauke Krüger, Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Oskars Keišs & Gunārs Pētersons
Migration is widespread among vertebrates. Yet bat migration has received little attention and only in the recent decades knowledge of it has been gained. Migration can cause significant changes in behaviour and physiology, due to increasing energy demands and aerodynamic constraints. Dietary shifts, for examples, have been shown to occur in birds before onset of migration. For bats it is not known if a change in diet occurs during migration, although especially breeding season related...

Data from: A pragmatic approach to the analysis of diets of generalist predators: the use of next-generation sequencing with no blocking probes

Josep Piñol, Victoria San Andrés, Elizabeth L. Clare, Gisela Mir & William O. C. Symondson
Predicting whether a predator is capable of affecting the dynamics of a prey species in the field implies the analysis of the complete diet of the predator, not simply rates of predation on a target taxon. Here, we employed the Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology to investigate the diet of a generalist arthropod predator. A complete dietary analysis requires the use of general primers, but these will also amplify the predator unless suppressed using a...

Data from: Molecular field analysis of trophic relationships in soil-dwelling invertebrates to identify mercury, lead and cadmium transmission through forest ecosystems

Lucija Šerić Jelaska, Jasna Jurasović, David S. Brown, Ian P. Vaughan & William O. C. Symondson
Contamination pathways in complex food chains in soil ecosystems can be difficult to elucidate. Molecular analysis of predator gut content can, however, rapidly reveal previously unidentified trophic interactions between invertebrates and thereby uncover pathways of pollutant spread. Here we measured concentrations of the toxic metals lead, cadmium and mercury in carabid beetle predators and their prey. Invertebrates were sampled at one control and four heavy metal polluted sites in order to reveal the impact of...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • Cardiff University
    13
  • Queen Mary University of London
    4
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • Western University
    2
  • University of London
    2
  • Kiel University
    2
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • University of Sussex
    1
  • University of Zagreb
    1