25 Works

Data from: Task-switching is associated with temporal delays in Temnothorax rugatulus ants

Gavin M. Leighton, Daniel Charbonneau & Anna Dornhaus
The major evolutionary transitions often result in reorganization of biological systems, and a component of such reorganization is that individuals within the system specialize on performing certain tasks, resulting in a division of labor. Although the traditional benefit of division of labor is thought to be a gain in work efficiency, one alternative benefit of specialization is avoiding temporal delays associated with switching tasks. While models have demonstrated that costs of task switching can drive...

Data from: Population structure of a vector-borne plant parasite

Kelsey M. Yule, Jennifer A. H. Koop, Nicolas M. Alexandre, Lauren R. Johnston & Noah K. Whiteman
Parasites are among the most diverse groups of life on Earth, yet complex natural histories often preclude studies of their speciation processes. The biology of parasitic plants facilitates in situ collection of data on both genetic structure and the mechanisms responsible for that structure. Here, we studied the role of mating, dispersal and establishment in host race formation of a parasitic plant. We investigated the population genetics of a vector-borne desert mistletoe (Phoradendron californicum) across...

Data from: The small nuclear genomes of Selaginella are associated with a low rate of genome size evolution

Anthony E. Baniaga, Nils Arrigo & Michael S. Barker
The haploid nuclear genome size (1C DNA) of vascular land plants varies over several orders of magnitude. Much of this observed diversity in genome size is due to the proliferation and deletion of transposable elements. To date, all vascular land plant lineages with extremely small nuclear genomes represent recently derived states, having ancestors with much larger genome sizes. The Selaginellaceae represent an ancient lineage with extremely small genomes. It is unclear how small nuclear genomes...

Data from: “Darwin’s corollary” and cytoplasmic incompatibility induced by Cardinium may contribute to speciation in Encarsia wasps (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae)

Marco Gebiola, Suzanne E. Kelly, Peter Hammerstein, Massimo Giorgini, Molly S. Hunter & Martha S. Hunter
The potential importance of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) – inducing bacterial symbionts in speciation of their arthropod hosts has been debated. Theoretical advances have led to a consensus that a role is plausible when CI is combined with other isolating barriers. However, the insect model systems Nasonia and Drosophila are the only two experimental examples documented. Here we analyzed the components of reproductive isolation between the parasitoid wasp Encarsia suzannae, which is infected by the CI-inducing...

Data from: Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry2Ab and survival on single-toxin and pyramided cotton in cotton bollworm from China

Laipan Liu, Meijing Gao, Song Yang, Shaoyan Liu, Yidong Wu, Yves Carrière & Yihua Yang
Evolution of Helicoverpa armigera resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton producing Cry1Ac is progressing in northern China and replacement of Cry1Ac cotton by pyramided Bt cotton has been considered to counter such resistance. Here, we investigated four of the eight conditions underlying success of the refuge strategy for delaying resistance to Cry1Ac+Cry2Ab cotton, a pyramid that has been used extensively against H. armigera outside China. Laboratory bioassays of a Cry2Ab-selected strain (An2Ab) and a related...

Data from: Behavioural hypervolumes of spider communities predict community performance and disbandment

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Daniel I. Bolnick, Andrew Sih, Nicholas DiRienzo & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Trait-based ecology argues that an understanding of the traits of interactors can enhance the predictability of ecological outcomes. We examine here whether the multidimensional behavioural-trait diversity of communities influences community performance and stability in situ. We created experimental communities of web-building spiders, each with an identical species composition. Communities contained one individual of each of five different species. Prior to establishing these communities in the field, we examined three behavioural traits for each individual spider....

Data from: Life-history strategy and behavioral type: risk-tolerance reflects growth rate and energy allocation in ant colonies

Sarah E. Bengston, Min Shin & Anna Dornhaus
Despite the recent interest in animal personality and behavioral syndromes, there is a paucity of explanations for why distinct behavioral traits should evolve to correlate. We investigate whether such correlations across apparently distinct behavioral traits may be explained by variation in life history strategy among individual ant colonies. Life history theory predicts that the way in which individuals allocate energy towards somatic maintenance or reproduction drives several distinct traits in physiology, morphology, and energy use;...

Data from: Social complexity influences brain investment and neural operation costs in ants

J. Frances Kamhi, Wulfila Gronenberg, Simon K.A. Robson, James F.A. Traniello, Simon K. A. Robson & James F. A. Traniello
The metabolic expense of producing and operating neural tissue required for adaptive behaviour is considered a significant selective force in brain evolution. In primates, brain size correlates positively with group size, presumably owing to the greater cognitive demands of complex social relationships in large societies. Social complexity in eusocial insects is also associated with large groups, as well as collective intelligence and division of labour among sterile workers. However, superorganism phenotypes may lower cognitive demands...

Data from: Investigating the impacts of field-realistic exposure to a neonicotinoid pesticide on bumblebee foraging, homing ability and colony growth

Dara A. Stanley, Avery L. Russell, Sarah J. Morrison, Catherine Rogers & Nigel E. Raine
The ability to forage and return home is essential to the success of bees as both foragers and pollinators. Pesticide exposure may cause behavioural changes that interfere with these processes, with consequences for colony persistence and delivery of pollination services. We investigated the impact of chronic exposure (5–43 days) to field-realistic levels of a neonicotinoid insecticide (2·4 ppb thiamethoxam) on foraging ability, homing success and colony size using radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in free-flying...

Data from: Ungulate distributions in a rangeland with competitors, predators, and pastoralists

Paul Schuette, Scott Creel & Dave Christianson
African rangelands support diverse ungulate communities whose member species exhibit unique combinations of body morphology and behaviour that have evolved over millions of years to limit the effects of competition and predation on fitness, and more recently, to cope with people and livestock. The mechanisms by which native ungulates cope with the combined effects of competition, predation and human disturbance are poorly understood. Addressing this knowledge gap will help guide management and conservation plans for...

Data from: MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi

V. Bala Chaudhary, Megan A. Rúa, Anita Antoninka, James D. Bever, Jeffery Cannon, Ashley Craig, Jessica Duchicela, Alicia Frame, Monique Gardes, Catherine Gehring, Michelle Ha, Miranda Hart, Jacob Hopkins, Baoming Ji, Nancy Collins Johnson, Wittaya Kaonongbua, Justine Karst, Roger T. Koide, Louis J. Lamit, James Meadow, Brook G. Milligan, John C. Moore, , Bridget Piculell, Blake Ramsby … & Jason D. Hoeksema
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: Observed forest sensitivity to climate implies large changes in 21st century North American forest growth

Noah D. Charney, Flurin Babst, Benjamin Poulter, Sydne Record, Valerie M. Trouet, David Frank, Brian J. Enquist & Margaret E. K. Evans
Predicting long-term trends in forest growth requires accurate characterisation of how the relationship between forest productivity and climatic stress varies across climatic regimes. Using a network of over two million tree-ring observations spanning North America and a space-for-time substitution methodology, we forecast climate impacts on future forest growth. We explored differing scenarios of increased water-use efficiency (WUE) due to CO2-fertilisation, which we simulated as increased effective precipitation. In our forecasts: (1) climate change negatively impacted...

Data from: 1970s and ‘Patient 0’ HIV-1 genomes illuminate early HIV/AIDS history in North America

Michael Worobey, Thomas D. Watts, Richard A. McKay, Marc A. Suchard, Timothy Granade, Dirk E. Teuwen, Beryl A. Koblin, Walid Heneine, Philippe Lemey & Harold W. Jaffe
The emergence of HIV-1 group M subtype B in North American men who have sex with men was a key turning point in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Phylogenetic studies have suggested cryptic subtype B circulation in the United States (US) throughout the 1970s1, 2 and an even older presence in the Caribbean2. However, these temporal and geographical inferences, based upon partial HIV-1 genomes that postdate the recognition of AIDS in 1981, remain contentious3, 4 and the...

Data from: Altered natal dispersal at the range periphery: the role of behavior, resources, and maternal condition

Melissa J. Merrick & John L. Koprowski
Natal dispersal outcomes are an interplay between environmental conditions and individual phenotypes. Peripheral, isolated populations may experience altered environmental conditions and natal dispersal patterns that differ from populations in contiguous landscapes. We document nonphilopatric, sex-biased natal dispersal in an endangered small mammal, the Mt. Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis), restricted to a single mountain. Other North American red squirrel populations are shown to have sex-unbiased, philopatric natal dispersal. We ask what environmental and intrinsic...

Data from: Climate change is projected to outpace rates of niche change in grasses

F. Alice Cang, Ashley A. Wilson & John J. Wiens
Climate change may soon threaten much of global biodiversity, especially if species cannot adapt to changing climatic conditions quickly enough. A critical question is how quickly climatic niches change, and if this speed is sufficient to prevent extinction as climates warm. Here, we address this question in the grass family (Poaceae). Grasses are fundamental to one of Earth's most widespread biomes (grasslands), and provide roughly half of all calories consumed by humans (including wheat, rice,...

Data from: Direct effects dominate responses to climate perturbations in grassland plant communities

Chengjin Chu, Andrew R. Kleinhesselink, Kris M. Havstad, Mitchel P. McClaran, Debra P. Peters, Lance T. Vermeire, Haiyan Wei & Peter B. Adler
Theory predicts that strong indirect effects of environmental change will impact communities when niche differences between competitors are small and variation in the direct effects experienced by competitors is large, but empirical tests are lacking. Here we estimate negative frequency dependence, a proxy for niche differences, and quantify the direct and indirect effects of climate change on each species. Consistent with theory, in four of five communities indirect effects are strongest for species showing weak...

Data from: Comparing macroecological patterns across continents: evolution of climatic niche breadth in varanid lizards

Long-Hui Lin & John J. Wiens
Macroecological analyses often test hypotheses at the global scale, or among more closely related species in a single region (e.g. continent). Here, we test several hypotheses about climatic niche widths among relatively closely related species that occur across multiple continents, and compare patterns within and across continents to see if they differ. We focus on the lizard genus Varanus (monitor lizards), which occurs in diverse environments in Africa, Asia, and Australia. We address three main...

Data from: Leaf development and demography explain photosynthetic seasonality in Amazon evergreen forests

Jin Wu, Loren P. Albert, Aline P. Lopes, Natalia Restrepo-Coupe, Matthew Hayek, Kenia T. Wiedemann, Kaiyu Guan, Scott C. Stark, Bradley Christoffersen, Neill Prohaska, Julia V. Tavares, Suelen Marostica, Hideki Kobayashi, Mauricio L. Ferreira, Kleber Silva Campos, Rodrigo Da Silva, Paulo M. Brando, Dennis G. Dye, Travis E. Huxman, Alfredo R. Huete, Bruce W. Nelson & Scott R. Saleska
In evergreen tropical forests, the extent, magnitude, and controls on photosynthetic seasonality are poorly resolved and inadequately represented in Earth system models. Combining camera observations with ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes at forests across rainfall gradients in Amazônia, we show that aggregate canopy phenology, not seasonality of climate drivers, is the primary cause of photosynthetic seasonality in these forests. Specifically, synchronization of new leaf growth with dry season litterfall shifts canopy composition toward younger, more light-use...

Data from: The contribution of developmental experience vs. condition to life history, trait variation, and individual differences

Nicholas DiRienzo & Pierre-Olivier Montiglio
Developmental experience, for example food abundance during juvenile stages, is known to affect life history and behaviour. However, the life history and behavioural consequences of developmental experience have rarely been studied in concert. As a result it is still unclear whether developmental experience affects behaviour through changes in life history, or independently of it. The effect of developmental experience on life history and behaviour may also be masked or affected by individual condition during adulthood....

Data from: Lack of aggression and apparent altruism towards intruders in a primitive termite

Feargus Cooney, Emma I.K. Vitikainen, Harry H. Marshall, Wilmie Van Royen, Robert L. Smith, Michael A. Cant, Nicole Goodey, Wilmie Van Rooyen & Emma I. K. Vitikainen
In eusocial insects, the ability to discriminate nest-mates from non-nest-mates is widespread and ensures that altruistic actions are directed towards kin and agonistic actions are directed towards non-relatives. Most tests of nest-mate recognition have focused on hymenopterans, and suggest that cooperation typically evolves in tandem with strong antagonism towards non-nest-mates. Here, we present evidence from a phylogenetically and behaviourally basal termite species that workers discriminate members of foreign colonies. However, contrary to our expectations, foreign...

Data from: Facilitated exploitation of pollination mutualisms: fitness consequences for plants

Sarah K. Richman, Rebecca E. Irwin, Cherie J. Nelson & Judith L. Bronstein
Mutualisms are only rarely one-to-one interactions: each species generally interacts with multiple mutualists. Exploitation is ubiquitous in mutualisms, and we would therefore expect that each mutualist interacts with multiple exploiters as well. Exploiter species may also interact with one another. For example, the action of one exploiter species might open the opportunity for exploitation by a second species. Exploitation is common in many plant–pollinator mutualisms: ‘primary’ nectar robbers feed through holes they make in flowers,...

Data from: Host nuclear genotype influences phenotype of a conditional mutualist symbiont

Martha S. Hunter, Peter Asiimwe, Anna G. Himler & Suzanne E. Kelly
Arthropods commonly carry maternally-inherited intracellular bacterial symbionts that may profoundly influence host biology and evolution. The intracellular symbiont Rickettsia sp. nr. bellii swept rapidly into populations of the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci in the southwestern USA. Previous laboratory experiments showed female-bias and fitness benefits were associated with Rickettsia infection, potentially explaining the high frequencies of infection observed in field populations, but the effects varied with whitefly genetic line. Here we explored whether host extranuclear or...

Data from: Global population structure of a worldwide pest and virus vector: genetic diversity and population history of the Bemisia tabaci sibling species group

Margarita Hadjistylli, George K. Roderick & Judith K. Brown
The whitefly Bemisia tabaci sibling species (sibsp.) group comprises morphologically indiscernible lineages of well-known exemplars referred to as biotypes. It is distributed throughout tropical and subtropical latitudes, and includes the contemporary invasive haplotypes, termed B and Q. Several well-studied B. tabaci biotypes exhibit ecological and biological diversity, however, most members are poorly studied or completely uncharacterized. Genetic studies have revealed substantial diversity within the group based on a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I...

Data from: Population genomic analyses reveal a history of range expansion and trait evolution across the native and invaded range of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis)

Brittany S. Barker, Krikor Andonian, Sarah M. Swope, Doug G. Luster & Katrina M. Dlugosch
Identifying sources of genetic variation and reconstructing invasion routes for non-native introduced species is central to understanding the circumstances under which they may evolve increased invasiveness. In this study, we used genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms to study the colonization history of Centaurea solstitialis in its native range in Eurasia and invasions into the Americas. We leveraged this information to pinpoint key evolutionary shifts in plant size, a focal trait associated with invasiveness in this species....

Data from: Genetic surfing, not allopatric divergence, explains spatial sorting of mitochondrial haplotypes in venomous coralsnakes

Jeffrey W. Streicher, Jay P. McEntee, Laura C. Drzich, Daren C. Card, Drew R. Schield, Utpal Smart, Christopher L. Parkinson, Tereza Jezkova, Eric N. Smith & Todd A. Castoe
Strong spatial sorting of genetic variation in contiguous populations is often explained by local adaptation or secondary contact following allopatric divergence. A third explanation, spatial sorting by stochastic effects of range expansion, has been considered less often though theoretical models suggest it should be widespread, if ephemeral. In a study designed to delimit species within a clade of venomous coralsnakes, we identified an unusual pattern within the Texas coral snake (Micrurus tener): strong spatial sorting...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Arizona
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  • New Mexico State University
    2
  • Montana State University
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Michigan Technological University
    1
  • King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi
    1
  • California State University, Northridge
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1