33 Works

Data from: Less favorable climates constrain demographic strategies in plants

Anna M. Csergo, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Olivier Broennimann, Shaun R. Coutts, Antoine Guisan, Amy L. Angert, Erik Welk, Iain Stott, Brian J. Enquist, Brian McGill, Jens-Christian Svenning, Cyrille Violle & Yvonne M. Buckley
Correlative species distribution models are based on the observed relationship between species’ occurrence and macroclimate or other environmental variables. In climates predicted less favourable populations are expected to decline, and in favourable climates they are expected to persist. However, little comparative empirical support exists for a relationship between predicted climate suitability and population performance. We found that the performance of 93 populations of 34 plant species worldwide – as measured by in situ population growth...

Data from: A new subfamily classification of the Leguminosae based on a taxonomically comprehensive phylogeny

, Anne Bruneau, Nasim Azani, Marielle Babineau, Edeline Gagnon, Carole Sinou, Royce Steeves, Erin Zimmerman, C. Donovan Bailey, Lynsey Kovar, Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao, Hannah Banks, RuthP. Clark, Manuel De La Estrella, Peter Gasson, GeoffreyC. Kite, BenteB. Klitgaard, GwilymP. Lewis, Danilo Neves, Gerhard Prenner, María De Lourdes Rico-Arce, ArianeR. Barbosa, Maria Cristina López-Roberts, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, PétalaG. Ribeiro … & Tingshuang Yi
The classification of the legume family proposed here addresses the long-known non-monophyly of the traditionally recognised subfamily Caesalpinioideae, by recognising six robustly supported monophyletic subfamilies. This new classification uses as its framework the most comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of legumes to date, based on plastid matK gene sequences, and including near-complete sampling of genera (698 of the currently recognised 765 genera) and ca. 20% (3696) of known species. The matK gene region has been the most...

Data from: Disentangling competitive versus climatic drivers of tropical forest mortality

Michiel Pillet, Emilie Joetzjer, Camille Belmin, Jérôme Chave, Philippe Ciais, Aurélie Dourdain, Margaret Evans, Bruno Hérault, Sebastiaan Luyssaert & Benjamin Poulter
1. Tropical forest mortality is controlled by biotic and abiotic processes, but how these processes interact to determine forest structure is not well understood. Using long-term demography data from permanent forest plots at the Paracou Tropical Forest Research Station in French Guiana, we analyzed the relative influence of competition and climate on tree mortality. We found that self-thinning is evident at the stand level, and is associated with clumped mortality at smaller scales (< 2...

Data from: Who needs 'lazy' workers? Inactive workers act as a 'reserve' labor force replacing active workers, but inactive workers are not replaced when they are removed

Daniel Charbonneau, Takao Sasaki & Anna Dornhaus
Social insect colonies are highly successful, self-organized complex systems. Surprisingly however, most social insect colonies contain large numbers of highly inactive workers. Although this may seem inefficient, it may be that inactive workers actually contribute to colony function. Indeed, the most commonly proposed explanation for inactive workers is that they form a ‘reserve’ labor force that becomes active when needed, thus helping mitigate the effects of colony workload fluctuations or worker loss. Thus, it may...

Data from: Interaction rewiring and the rapid turnover of plant-pollinator networks

Paul J. CaraDonna, William K. Petry, Ross M. Brennan, James L. Cunningham, Judith L. Bronstein, Nickolas M. Waser & Nathan J. Sanders
Whether species interactions are static or change over time has wide-reaching ecological and evolutionary consequences. However, species interaction networks are typically constructed from temporally aggregated interaction data, thereby implicitly assuming that interactions are fixed. This approach has advanced our understanding of communities, but it obscures the timescale at which interactions form (or dissolve) and the drivers and consequences of such dynamics. We address this knowledge gap by quantifying the within-season turnover of plant–pollinator interactions from...

Data from: Selection for collective aggressiveness favors social susceptibility in social spiders

Jonathan N. Pruitt, Colin M. Wright, James L. L. Lichtenstein, Gregory T. Chism, Brendan L. McEwen, Ambika Kamath & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Particularly socially influential individuals are present in many groups, but it is unclear whether their emergence is determined by their social influence versus the social susceptibility of others. The social spider Stegodyphus dumicola shows regional variation in apparent leader-follower dynamics. We use this variation to evaluate the relative contributions of leader social influence versus follower social susceptibility in driving this social order. Using chimeric colonies that combine potential leaders and followers, we discover that leader-follower...

Data from: Reproductive interference and fecundity affect competitive interactions of sibling species with low mating barriers: experimental and theoretical evidence

Marco Gebiola, Suzanne E. Kelly, Lennart Velten, Roman Zug, Peter Hammerstein, Massimo Giorgini & Martha S. Hunter
When allopatric species with incomplete prezygotic isolation come into secondary contact, the outcome of their interaction is not easily predicted. The parasitoid wasp Encarsia suzannae (iES), infected by Cardinium inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), and its sibling species E. gennaroi (EG), not infected by bacterial endosymbionts, may have diverged because of the complementary action of CI and asymmetric hybrid incompatibilities. Whereas postzygotic isolation is now complete due to sterility of F1 hybrid progeny, prezygotic isolation is...

Data from: Diversification rates are more strongly related to microhabitat than climate in squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes)

Melissa Bars-Closel, Tiana Kohlsdorf, Daniel S. Moen & John J. Wiens
Patterns of species richness among clades can be directly explained by the ages of clades or their rates of diversification. The factors that most strongly influence diversification rates remain highly uncertain, since most studies typically consider only a single predictor variable. Here, we explore the relative impacts of macroclimate (i.e., occurring in tropical vs. temperate regions) and microhabitat use (i.e., terrestrial, fossorial, arboreal, aquatic) on diversification rates of squamate reptile clades (lizards and snakes). We...

Data from: Chaparral bird community responses to prescribed fire and shrub removal in three management seasons

Erica A. Newman, Jennifer B. Potts, Morgan W. Tingley, Charles Vaughn & Scott L. Stephens
Chaparral, a type of shrubland common throughout the California Floristic Province, is subject to management and removal in regions where wildfire threatens human lives and property. Management practices include conducting prescribed burns outside of the historical fire season and employing mechanical fuel reduction (mastication). As the wildland–urban interface grows, particularly in coastal California, more of this ecosystem is subject to active management. To understand the ecological implications of current California chaparral fire management practices, we...

Data from: Colony-level behavioral variation correlates with differences in expression of the foraging gene in red imported fire ants

Alison A. Bockoven, Craig J. Coates & Micky D. Eubanks
Among social insects, colony-level variation is likely to be widespread and have significant ecological consequences. Very few studies, however, have documented how genetic factors relate to behavior at the colony level. Differences in expression of the foraging gene have been associated with differences in foraging and activity of a wide variety of organisms. We quantified expression of the red imported fire ant foraging gene (sifor) in workers from 21 colonies collected across the natural range...

Data from: Foraging strategy predicts foraging economy in a facultative secondary nectar robber

Sarah K. Richman, Rebecca E. Irwin & Judith L. Bronstein
In mutualistic interactions, the decision whether to cooperate or cheat depends on the relative costs and benefits of each strategy. In pollination mutualisms, secondary nectar robbing is a facultative behavior employed by a diverse array of nectar-feeding organisms, and is thought to be a form of cheating. Primary robbers create holes in floral tissue through which they feed on nectar, whereas secondary robbers, which often lack chewing mouthparts, feed on nectar through existing holes. Because...

Data from: Modeling connectivity to identify current and future anthropogenic barriers to movement of large carnivores: a case study in the American Southwest

Meredith L. McClure, Brett G. Dickson & Kerry L. Nicholson
This study sought to identify critical areas for puma (Puma concolor) movement across the state of Arizona in the American Southwest and to identify those most likely to be impacted by current and future human land uses, particularly expanding urban development and associated increases in traffic volume. Human populations in this region are expanding rapidly, with the potential for urban centers and busy roads to increasingly act as barriers to demographic and genetic connectivity of...

Data from: Extensive gene tree discordance and hemiplasy shaped the genomes of North American columnar cacti

Dario Copetti, Alberto Burquez, Enriquena Bustamante, Joseph L. M. Charboneau, Kevin L. Childs, Luis E. Eguiarte, Seunghee Lee, Tiffany L. Liu, Michelle M. McMahon, Noah K. Whiteman, Rod A. Wing, Martin F. Wojciechowski & Michael J. Sanderson
Few clades of plants have proven as difficult to classify as cacti. One explanation may be an unusually high level of convergent and parallel evolution (homoplasy). To evaluate support for this phylogenetic hypothesis at the molecular level, we sequenced the genomes of four cacti in the especially problematic tribe Pachycereeae, which contains most of the large columnar cacti of Mexico and adjacent areas, including the iconic saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) of the Sonoran Desert. We...

Data from: No geographic variation in thermoregulatory color plasticity and limited variation in heat-avoidance behavior in Battus philenor caterpillars

Matthew E. Nielsen
Phenotypic plasticity can help organisms cope with variation in their current environment, including temperature variation, but not all environments are equally variable. In the least variable or extreme environments, plasticity may no longer be used. In this case, the plasticity could be lost all together, or it could persist with either the same or an altered reaction norm, depending on factors such as the plasticity's costs. In the pipevine swallowtail caterpillar (Battus philenor), I tested...

Data from: Patterns of pollen and nectar foraging specialization by bumblebees over multiple timescales using RFID

Avery L. Russell, Sarah J. Morrison, Eleni H. Moschonas & Daniel R. Papaj
The ecological success of social insects is frequently ascribed to improvements in task performance due to division of labour amongst workers. While much research has focused on improvements associated with lifetime task specialization, members of colonies can specialize on a given task over shorter time periods. Eusocial bees in particular must collect pollen and nectar rewards to survive, but most workers appear to mix collection of both rewards over their lifetimes. We asked whether bumblebees...

Data from: Does environmental heterogeneity drive functional trait variation? A test in montane and alpine meadows

Jordan Stark, Rebecca Lehman, Lake Crawford, Brian J. Enquist & Benjamin Blonder
While community-weighted means of plant traits have been linked to mean environmental conditions at large scales, the drivers of trait variation within communities are not well understood. Local environmental heterogeneity (such as microclimate variability), in addition to mean environmental conditions, may decrease the strength of environmental filtering and explain why communities support different amounts of trait variation. Here, we assess two hypotheses: first, that more heterogeneous local environments and second, that less extreme environments, should...

Data from: Estimating diversification rates for higher taxa: BAMM can give problematic estimates of rates and rate shifts

Andreas L. S. Meyer & John J. Wiens
Estimates of diversification rates are invaluable for many macroevolutionary studies. Recently, an approach called BAMM (Bayesian Analysis of Macro-evolutionary Mixtures) has become widely used for estimating diversification rates and rate shifts. At the same time, several papers have concluded that estimates of net diversification rates from the method-of-moments (MS) estimators are inaccurate. Yet, no studies have compared the ability of these two methods to accurately estimate clade diversification rates. Here, we use simulations to compare...

Data from: Genomic variation across two barn swallow hybrid zones reveals traits associated with divergence in sympatry and allopatry

Elizabeth S.C. Scordato, Matthew R. Wilkins, Georgy Semenov, Alexander S. Rubtsov, Nolan C. Kane, Rebecca J. Safran & Elizabeth S. C. Scordato
Hybrid zones are geographic regions where isolating barriers between divergent populations are challenged by admixture. Identifying factors that facilitate or inhibit hybridization in sympatry can illuminate the processes that maintain those reproductive barriers. We analyzed patterns of hybridization and phenotypic variation across two newly-discovered hybrid zones between three subspecies of barn swallow (Hirundo rustica). These subspecies differ in ventral coloration and wing length, traits that are targets of sexual and natural selection, respectively, and are...

Data from: The effect of atomoxetine on random and directed exploration in humans

Christopher M. Warren, Robert C. Wilson, Nic J. Van Der Wee, Eric J. Giltay, Martijn S. Van Noorden, Jonathan D. Cohen & Sander Nieuwenhuis
The adaptive regulation of the trade-off between pursuing a known reward (exploitation) and sampling lesser-known options in search of something better (exploration) is critical for optimal performance. Theory and recent empirical work suggest that humans use at least two strategies for solving this dilemma: a directed strategy in which choices are explicitly biased toward information seeking, and a random strategy in which decision noise leads to exploration by chance. Here we examined the hypothesis that...

Data from: Centennial-scale reductions in nitrogen availability in temperate forests of the United States

K. K. McLauchlan, L. M. Gerhart, J. J. Battles, J. M. Craine, A. J. Elmore, P. E. Higuera, M. C. Mack, B. E. McNeil, D. M. Nelson, N. Pederson & S. S. Perakis
Forests cover 30% of the terrestrial Earth surface and are a major component of the global carbon (C) cycle. Humans have doubled the amount of global reactive nitrogen (N), increasing deposition of N onto forests worldwide. However, other global changes—especially climate change and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations—are increasing demand for N, the element limiting primary productivity in temperate forests, which could be reducing N availability. To determine the long-term, integrated effects of global changes...

Data from: Context-dependent defences in turtle ants: resource defensibility and threat level induce dynamic shifts in soldier deployment

Scott Powell, Matina Donaldson-Matasci, Augustus Woodrow-Tomizuka & Anna Dornhaus
1. Induced defences involve the dynamic deployment of limited and specialized defensive resources across multiple locations, to maximize organismal defensive function and fitness. They have been studied intensively in plants and solitary animals, but the induced defences of complex animal societies are poorly understood by comparison, despite the coordinated defensive actions of these taxa. 2. Here, we ask whether the level of environmental danger induces shifts in the deployment of limited and morphologically specialized soldiers...

Data from: Humans permanently occupied the Andean highlands by at least 7 ka

Randall Haas, Ioana C. Stefenescu, Alex Garcia-Putnam, Mark S. Aldenderfer, Mark T. Clementz, Melissa S. Murphy, Carlos Viviano Llave, James T. Watson, Alexander Garcia-Putnam & Ioana C. Stefanescu
High-elevation environments above 2500 metres above sea level (m.a.s.l.) were among the planet's last frontiers of human colonization. Research on the speed and tempo of this colonization process is active and holds implications for understanding rates of genetic, physiological and cultural adaptation in our species. Permanent occupation of high-elevation environments in the Andes Mountains of South America tentatively began with hunter–gatherers around 9 ka according to current archaeological estimates, though the timing is currently debated....

Data from: Out of the dark: 350 million years of conservatism and evolution in diel activity patterns in vertebrates

Samantha R. Anderson & John J. Wiens
Many animals are active only during a particular time (e.g. day vs. night), a partitioning that may have important consequences for species co-existence. An open question is the extent to which this diel activity niche is evolutionarily conserved or labile. Here, we analyze diel activity data across a phylogeny of 1914 tetrapod species. We find strong phylogenetic signal, showing that closely related species tend to share similar activity patterns. Ancestral reconstructions show that nocturnality was...

Data from: Phylogenomic analyses of more than 4000 nuclear loci resolve the origin of snakes among lizard families

Jeffrey W. Streicher & John J. Wiens
Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are the most diverse group of terrestrial vertebrates, with more than 10 000 species. Despite considerable effort to resolve relationships among major squamates clades, some branches have remained difficult. Among the most vexing has been the placement of snakes among lizard families, with most studies yielding only weak support for the position of snakes. Furthermore, the placement of iguanian lizards has remained controversial. Here we used targeted sequence capture to...

Data from: Phenological responsiveness to climate differs among four species of Quercus in North America

Katharine L. Gerst, Natalie L. Rossington & Susan J. Mazer
1.The timing of the seasonal activity of organisms is a tractable indicator of climate change. Many studies in North America have investigated the role of temperature on the onset date of phenological transitions in temperate deciduous trees and found that the onset of leafing and flowering in numerous species has occurred earlier in recent years, apparently in response to higher temperatures in winter and spring. 2.Few studies have examined the climatic and biogeographic drivers of...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    33

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    33

Affiliations

  • University of Arizona
    33
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals
    2
  • New Mexico State University
    2
  • Santa Fe Institute
    2
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    2
  • Montana State University
    2
  • Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2