56 Works

Data from: Estimating egg mass-body mass relationships in birds

John Rotenberry & Priya Balasubramaniam
The mass of a bird’s egg is a critical attribute of the species’ life history and represents a fundamental component of reproductive effort. Indeed, the trade-off between the number of eggs in a clutch and clutch mass lies at the heart of understanding how environmental attributes such as nest predation or adult mortality influence reproductive investment. However, egg masses have not been reported for the majority of avian species. We capitalized on the strong allometric...

Species complex diversification by host plant use in an herbivorous insect: The source of Puerto Rican cactus mealybug pest and implications for biological control

Daniel Poveda-Martínez, María Aguirre, Guillermo Logarzo, Stephen D. Hight, Serguei Triapitsyn, Hilda Diaz-Soltero, Marcelo Vitorino & Esteban Hasson
Cryptic taxa have often been observed in the form of host‐associated species that diverged as the result of adaptation to alternate host plants. Untangling cryptic diversity in species complexes that encompass invasive species is a mandatory task for pest management. Moreover, investigating the evolutionary history of a species complex may help to understand the drivers of their diversification. The mealybug Hypogeococcus pungens was believed to be a polyphagous species from South America and has been...

Pigmentation Genes Show Evidence of Repeated Divergence and Multiple Bouts of Introgression in Setophaga Warblers

David Toews, Marcella Baiz, Andrew Wood, Alan Brelsford & Irby Lovette
Species radiations have long served as model systems in evolutionary biology. However, it has only recently become possible to study the genetic bases of the traits responsible for diversification, and only in a small number of model systems. Here we use genomes of 36 species of North, Central, and South American warblers to highlight the role of pigmentation genes—involved in melanin and carotenoid processing—in the diversification of this group. We show that agouti signaling protein...

Data from: Environmental change, if unaccounted, prevents detection of cryptic evolution in a wild population

Tomos Potter, Ronald D. Bassar, Paul Bentzen, Emily W. Ruell, Julián Torres-Dowdall, Corey A. Handelsman, Cameron K. Ghalambor, Joseph Travis, David N. Reznick & Tim Coulson
Detecting contemporary evolution requires demonstrating that genetic change has occurred. Mixed-effects models allow estimation of quantitative genetic parameters and are widely used to study evolution in wild populations. However, predictions of evolution based on these parameters frequently fail to match observations. Furthermore, such studies often lack an independent measure of evolutionary change against which to verify predictions. Here, we applied three commonly used quantitative genetic approaches to predict the evolution of size at maturity in...

Subspecies differentiation in an enigmatic chaparral shrub species

Yi Huang, Glen Morrison & Amy Litt
Delimiting biodiversity units is difficult in organisms in which differentiation is obscured by hybridization, plasticity, and other factors that blur phenotypic boundaries. Such work is more complicated when the focal units are subspecies, the definition of which has not been broadly explored in the era of modern genetic methods. Eastwood manzanita (Arctostaphylos glandulosa Eastw.) is a widely distributed and morphologically complex chaparral shrub species with much subspecific variation that has proven challenging to categorize. Currently...

Data from: Floral bagging differentially affects handling behaviors and single-visit pollen deposition by honey bees and native bees

Jacob Cecala, Pierre Lau & Joan Leong
Measurements of pollinator performance are crucial to pollination studies, enabling researchers to quantify the relative value of different pollinator species to plant reproduction. One of the most widely employed measures of pollinator performance is single-visit pollen deposition, the number of conspecific pollen grains deposited to a stigma after one pollinator visit. To ensure a pollen-free stigma, experimenters must first bag flowers before exposing them to a pollinator. Bagging flowers, however, may unintentionally manipulate floral characteristics...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56

Affiliations

  • University of California, Riverside
    56
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    3
  • Imperial College London
    3
  • University of California, Irvine
    3
  • Cornell University
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of California, Merced
    2
  • University of California, San Diego
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • San Diego State University
    2