14 Works

Size-selective mortality induces evolutionary changes in group risk-taking behavior and the circadian system in a fish

Valerio Sbragaglia, Valerio Sbragaglia, Jose Fernando López-Olmeda, Elena Frigato, Cristiano Bertolucci & Robert Arlinghaus
1. Intensive and trait-selective mortality of fish and wildlife can cause evolutionary changes in a range of life-history and behavioral traits. These changes might in turn alter the circadian system due to coevolutionary mechanisms or correlated selection responses both at behavioral and molecular levels, with knock-on effects on daily physiological processes and behavioral outputs. 2. We examined the evolutionary impact of size-selective harvesting on group risk-taking behavior and the circadian system in a model fish...

Data from: DNA methylation and gene expression changes derived from assisted reproductive technologies can be decreased by reproductive fluids

Sebastian Canovas, Elena Ivanova, Raquel Romar, Soledad García-Martínez, Cristina Soriano-Úbeda, Francisco Alberto A. García-Vázquez, Heba Saadeh, Simon Andrews, Gavin Kelsey & Pilar Coy
The number of children born since the origin of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) exceeds 5 million. The majority seem healthy, but a higher frequency of defects has been reported among ART-conceived infants, suggesting an epigenetic cost. We report the first whole-genome DNA methylation datasets from single pig blastocysts showing differences between in vivo and in vitro produced embryos. Blastocysts were produced in vitro either without (C-IVF) or in the presence of natural reproductive fluids (Natur-IVF)....

Disentangling responses to natural stressor and human impact gradients in river ecosystems across Europe

Rachel Stubbington, Romain Sarremejane, Alex Laini, Núria Cid, Zoltán Csabai, Judy England, Antoni Munné, Tom Aspin, Núria Bonada, Daniel Bruno-Collados, Sophie Cauvy-Fraunie, Richard Chadd, Claudia Dienstl, Pau Fortuño, Wolfram Graf, Cayetano Gutiérrez-Cánovas, Andy House, Ioannis Karaouzas, Eleana Kazila, Andrés Millán, Maria Morais, Petr Pařil, Alex Pickwell, Marek Polášek, David Sánchez-Fernández … & Thibault Datry
1. Rivers are dynamic ecosystems in which both human impacts and climate-driven drying events are increasingly common. These anthropogenic and natural stressors interact to influence the biodiversity and functioning of river ecosystems. Disentangling ecological responses to these interacting stressors is necessary to guide management actions that support ecosystems adapting to global change. 2. We analysed the independent and interactive effects of human impacts and natural drying on aquatic invertebrate communities—a key biotic group used to...

Data from: Carnivore carcasses are avoided by carnivores

Marcos Moleon, Carlos Martínez-Carrasco, Oliver Muellerklein, Wayne Getz, Carlos Muñoz-Lozano, José Antonio Sánchez-Zapata & Wayne M. Getz
1. Ecologists have traditionally focused on herbivore carcasses as study models in scavenging research. However, some observations of scavengers avoiding feeding on carnivore carrion suggest that different types of carrion may lead to differential pressures. Untested assumptions about carrion produced at different trophic levels could therefore lead ecologists to overlook important evolutionary processes and their ecological consequences. 2. Our general goal was to investigate the use of mammalian carnivore carrion by vertebrate scavengers. In particular,...

Data from: Climate rather than geography separates two European honeybee subspecies

Cristian Ovidiu Coroian, Irene Muñoz, Ellen A. Schlüns, Orsolya Reka Paniti-Teleky, Silvio Erler, Emila Maria Furdui, Liviu Alexandru Mărghitaş, Daniel Severus Dezmirean, Helge Schlüns, Pilar De La Rúa & Robin A. Moritz
Both climatic and geographic factors play an important role for the biogeographic distribution of species. The Carpathian mountain ridge has been suggested as a natural geographic divide between the two honeybee subspecies Apis mellifera carnica and A. m. macedonica. We sampled one worker from one colony each at 138 traditional apiaries located across the Carpathians spanning from the Hungarian plains to the Danube delta. All samples were sequenced at the mitochondrial tRNALeu-cox2 intergenic region and...

Data from: Signatures of selection in the Iberian honey bee (Apis mellifera iberiensis) revealed by a genome scan analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms

Julio Chávez-Galarza, Dora Henriques, J. Spencer Johnston, João C. Azevedo, John C. Patton, Irene Muñoz, Pilar De La Rúa & Maria Alice Pinto
Understanding the genetic mechanisms of adaptive population divergence is one of the most fundamental endeavours in evolutionary biology and is becoming increasingly important as it will allow predictions about how organisms will respond to global environmental crisis. This is particularly important for the honey bee, a species of unquestionable ecological and economical importance that has been exposed to increasing human-mediated selection pressures. Here, we conducted a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome scan in honey bees...

Data from: The chicken or the egg? Adaptation to desiccation and salinity tolerance in a lineage of water beetles

Susana Pallarés, Paula Arribas, David T. Bilton, Andrés Millán, Josefa Velasco & Ignacio Ribera
Transitions from fresh to saline habitats are restricted to a handful of insect lineages, as the colonization of saline waters requires specialized mechanisms to deal with osmotic stress. Previous studies have suggested that tolerance to salinity and desiccation could be mechanistically and evolutionarily linked, but the temporal sequence of these adaptations is not well established for individual lineages. We combined molecular, physiological and ecological data to explore the evolution of desiccation resistance, hyporegulation ability (i.e.,...

Data from: Integration of conflict into integrative taxonomy: fitting hybridization in species delimitation of Mesocarabus (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

Carmelo Andújar, Paula Arribas, Carlos Ruiz, José Serrano & Jesús Gómez-Zurita
In species differentiation, characters do not usually diverge synchronously and there are also processes that effectively shuffle character states present in lineages descendant from a common ancestor. Species are thus expected to show some degree of incongruence among characters, and we argue that taxonomic delimitation actually benefits from integrative approaches and objective strategies dealing with character conflict. We illustrate the potential of exploiting conflict for species delimitation in a study-case of ground beetles of the...

Data from: Biological invasion modifies the co-occurrence patterns of insects along a stress gradient

José Antonio Carbonell, Josefa Velasco, Andres Millan, Andy J. Green, Cristina Coccia, Simone Guareschi & Cayetano Gutiérrez-Cánovas
Biological invasions have become one of the most important drivers of biodiversity loss and ecosystem change world-wide. However, it is still unclear how invasions may interact with local abiotic stressors, which are expected to increase as global change intensifies. Furthermore, we know little about the response to biological invasions of insects, despite their disproportionate contribution to global animal biodiversity. The aim of the present work is to investigate the impact of an invasive aquatic insect...

Data from: Trophic consequences of introduced species: comparative impacts of increased inter-specific versus intra-specific competitive interactions

Robert J. Britton, Ana Ruiz-Navarro, Hugo Verreycken, Fatima Amat Trigo & Fatima Amat-Trigo
1. Invasive species can cause substantial ecological impacts on native biodiversity. Whilst ecological theory attempts to explain the processes involved in the trophic integration of invaders into native food webs and their competitive impacts on resident species, results are equivocal. In addition, quantifying the relative strength of impacts from non-native species (inter-specific competition) versus the release of native conspecifics (intra-specific competition) is important but rarely completed. 2. Two model non-native fishes, the globally invasive Cyprinus...

Irreversible habitat specialization does not constrain diversification in hypersaline water beetles

Adrián Villastrigo, Paula Arribas & Ignacio Ribera
Specialization to extreme environments is often considered an evolutionary dead-end, leading to irreversible adaptations and reduced evolvability. There is, however, mixed evidence of this macroevolutionary pattern, and limited data from speciose lineages. Here, we tested the effect of habitat specialization to hypersaline waters in the diversification rates of aquatic beetles of the genus Ochthebius (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae), using a molecular phylogeny with more than 50% of the 546 recognized species, including representatives of all subgenus and...

Intercontinental long‐distance seed dispersal across the Mediterranean Basin explains population genetic structure of a bird‐dispersed shrub

V. Martínez-López, Cristina García, Víctor Zapata, Francisco Robledano & Pilar De La Rua
Long-distance dispersal (LDD) is a pivotal process for plants determining their range of distribution and promoting gene flow among distant populations. Most fleshy-fruited species rely on frugivorous vertebrates to disperse their seeds across the landscape. While LDD events are difficult to record, a few ecological studies have shown that birds move a sizeable number of ingested seeds across geographic barriers, such as sea straits. The foraging movements of migrant frugivores across distant populations, including those...

Data from: Multifarious selection through environmental change: acidity and predator-mediated adaptive divergence in the moor frog (Rana arvalis)

Andrés Egea-Serrano, Sandra Hangartner, Anssi Laurila & Katja Räsänen
Environmental change can simultaneously cause abiotic stress and alter biological communities, yet adaptation of natural populations to co-changing environmental factors is poorly understood. We studied adaptation to acid and predator stress in six moor frog (Rana arvalis) populations along an acidification gradient, where abundance of invertebrate predators increases with increasing acidity of R. arvalis breeding ponds. First, we quantified divergence among the populations in anti-predator traits (behaviour and morphology) at different rearing conditions in the...

Data from: SNPs selected by information content outperform randomly selected microsatellite loci for delineating genetic identification and introgression in the endangered dark European honeybee (Apis mellifera mellifera)

Irene Muñoz, Dora Henriques, Laura Jara, J. Spencer Johnston, Julio Chávez-Galarza, Pilar De La Rúa & M. Alice Pinto
The honeybee (Apis mellifera) has been threatened by multiple factors, including pests and pathogens, pesticides, and loss of locally adapted gene complexes due to replacement and introgression. In western Europe, the genetic integrity of the native A.m. mellifera (M-lineage) is endangered due to trading and intensive queen breeding with commercial subspecies of eastern European ancestry (C-lineage). Effective conservation actions require reliable molecular tools to identify purebred A.m. mellifera colonies. Microsatellites have been preferred for identification...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    1
  • 2020
    3
  • 2017
    5
  • 2016
    1
  • 2014
    3
  • 2013
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Murcia
    14
  • Spanish National Research Council
    3
  • Polytechnic Institute of Bragança
    2
  • Texas A&M University
    2
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • Plymouth University
    1
  • University of Crete
    1
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1