78 Works

Data from: Perioperative medication management: expanding the role of the preadmission clinic pharmacist in a single centre, randomised controlled trial of collaborative prescribing

Andrew R. Hale, Ian D. Coombes, Julie Stokes, David McDougall, Karen Whitfield, Elizabeth Maycock & Lisa Nissen
Objectives: Current evidence to support non-medical prescribing is predominantly qualitative, with little evaluation of accuracy, safety and appropriateness. Our aim was to evaluate a new model of service for the Australia healthcare system, of inpatient medication prescribing by a pharmacist in an elective surgery pre admission clinic (PAC) against usual care, using an endorsed performance framework. Design: Single centre, randomised controlled, two arm trial Setting: Elective surgery pre admission clinic in Brisbane based tertiary hospital...

Data from: A multi-genome analysis approach enables tracking of the invasion of a single Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia) clone throughout the New World

Le Kang, Bo Zhang, Susan Fuller & Owain Edwards
This study investigated the population genetics, demographic history and pathway of invasion of the Russian wheat aphid (RWA) from its native range in Central Asia, the Middle East and Europe to South Africa and the Americas. We screened microsatellite markers, mitochondrial DNA, and endosymbiont genes in 504 RWA clones from nineteen populations worldwide. Following pathway analyses of microsatellite and endosymbiont data, we postulate that Turkey and Syria were the most likely sources of invasion to...

Data from: Using decision trees to understand structure in missing data

Nicholas J. Tierney, Fiona A. Harden, Maurice J. Harden & Kerrie L. Mengersen
Objectives: Demonstrate the application of decision trees—classification and regression trees (CARTs), and their cousins, boosted regression trees (BRTs)—to understand structure in missing data. Setting: Data taken from employees at 3 different industrial sites in Australia. Participants: 7915 observations were included. Materials and methods: The approach was evaluated using an occupational health data set comprising results of questionnaires, medical tests and environmental monitoring. Statistical methods included standard statistical tests and the ‘rpart’ and ‘gbm’ packages for...

Data from: Sexual selection in true fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae): transcriptome and experimental evidences for phytochemicals increasing male competitive ability

Nagalingam Kumaran, Peter J. Prentis, Kalimuthu Palanivel Mangalam, Mark K. Schutze & Anthony R. Clarke
In male tephritid fruit flies of the genus Bactrocera, feeding on secondary plant compounds (sensu lato male lures = methyl eugenol, raspberry ketone and zingerone) increases male mating success. Ingested male lures alter the male pheromonal blend, normally making it more attractive to females and this is considered the primary mechanism for the enhanced mating success. However, the male lures raspberry ketone and zingerone are known, across a diverse range of other organisms, to be...

Data from: Avian diversification patterns across the K-Pg boundary: influence of calibrations, datasets and model misspecification

Daniel T. Ksepka & Matthew J. Phillips
Birds represent the most diverse extant tetrapod clade, with ca. 10,000 extant species, and the timing of the crown avian radiation remains hotly debated. The fossil record supports a primarily Cenozoic radiation of crown birds, whereas molecular divergence dating analyses generally imply that this radiation was well underway during the Cretaceous. Furthermore, substantial differences have been noted between published divergence estimates. These have been variously attributed to clock model, calibration regime, and gene type. One...

Data from: Herbivores sculpt leaf traits differently in grasslands depending on life form and land-use histories

Jennifer Firn, Martin Schütz, Huong Nguyen & Anita C. Risch
Vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores alter plant communities directly by selectively consuming plant species; and indirectly by inducing morphological and physiological changes to plant traits that provide competitive or survivorship advantages to some life forms over others. Progressively excluding aboveground herbivore communities (ungulates, medium and small sized mammals, invertebrates) over five growing seasons, we explored how leaf morphology (specific leaf area or SLA) and nutrition (nitrogen, carbon, phosphorous, potassium, sodium, and calcium) of different plant life...

Data from: Internal and external cooling methods and their effect on body temperature, thermal perception and dexterity

Matthew J. Maley, Geoffrey M. Minett, Aaron J.E. Bach, Stephani A. Zietek, Kelly L. Stewart, Ian B. Stewart, Aaron J. E. Bach & Stephanie A. Zietek
Objective: The present study aimed to compare a range of cooling methods possibly utilised by occupational workers, focusing on their effect on body temperature, perception and manual dexterity. Methods: Ten male participants completed eight trials involving 30 min of seated rest followed by 30 min of cooling or control of no cooling (CON) (34 °C, 58 % relative humidity). The cooling methods utilised were: ice cooling vest (CV0), phase change cooling vest melting at 14...

Effect of tomato-fruit cultivar and ripening stage on Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) egg and larval survival

Shirin Roohigohar
In studies of frugivorous tephritids, determining when offspring (i.e. egg and three larval instars) mortality occurs within the fruit can greatly improve the mechanistic understanding of the fly/host interaction. Previous research has demonstrated that the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, has differential offspring performance in two tomato cultivars Cherry and Roma, but when juvenile mortality was occurring was not determined. We examined B. tryoni egg and larval survival in three different ripening stages (immature-green (IG),...

Vegetation structure and ground cover attributes describe the occurrence of a newly discovered carnivorous marsupial on the Tweed Shield Volcano caldera, the endangered black-tailed dusky antechinus (Antechinus arktos).

Coral Pearce, Caitlin Riordan, W. McDonald, Ian Gynther & Andrew Baker
The black-tailed dusky antechinus (Antechinus arktos) is a recently discovered, endangered, carnivorous marsupial mammal endemic to the Tweed Shield Volcano caldera, straddling the border between Queensland and New South Wales in eastern Australia. The species’ preference for cool, high altitude habitats makes it particularly vulnerable to a shifting climate as these habitats recede. Aside from basic breeding ecology and dietary patterns the species’ biology is largely unknown. Understanding fine scale habitat attributes preferred by this...

Data from: Using virtual reality to estimate aesthetic values of coral reefs

Julie Vercelloni, Sam Clifford, M. Julian Caley, Alan R. Pearse, Ross Brown, Allan James, Bryce Christensen, Tomasz Bednarz, Ken Anthony, Manuel González-Rivero, Kerrie Mengersen & Erin E. Peterson
Aesthetic value, or beauty, is important to the relationship between humans and natural environments and is, therefore, a fundamental socioeconomic attribute of conservation alongside other ecosystem services. However, beauty is difficult to quantify and is not estimated well using traditional approaches to monitoring coral reef aesthetics. To improve the estimation of ecosystem aesthetic values, we developed and implemented a novel framework used to quantify features of coral reef aesthetics based on people’s perceptions of beauty....

Data from: Without management interventions, endemic wet-sclerophyll forest is transitioning to rainforest in World Heritage listed K’gari (Fraser Island), Australia

Vithya Krishnan, Nicole Robinson, Jennifer Firn, Grahame Applegate, John Herbohn & Susanne Schmidt
Wet-sclerophyll forests are unique ecosystems that can transition to dry-sclerophyll forests or to rainforests. Understanding of the dynamics of these forests for conservation is limited. We evaluated the long-term succession of wet-sclerophyll forest on World Heritage listed K’gari (Fraser Island)the world’s largest sand island. We recorded the presence and growth of tree species in three 0.4 hectare plots that had been subjected to selective logging, fire, and cyclone disturbance over 65 years, from 1952 to...

Data from: SRUD: a simple non-destructive method for accurate quantification of plant diversity dynamics

Pengfei Zhang, George A. Kowalchuk, Merel B. Soons, Mariet M. Hefting, Chengjin Chu, Jennifer Firn, Cynthia S. Brown, Xianhui Zhou, Xiaolong Zhou, Zhi Guo, Zhigang Zhao, Guozhen Du & Yann Hautier
1. Predicting changes in plant diversity in response to human activities represents one of the major challenges facing ecologists and land managers striving for sustainable ecosystem management. Classical field studies have emphasized the importance of community primary productivity in regulating changes in plant species richness. However, experimental studies have yielded inconsistent empirical evidence, suggesting that primary productivity is not the sole determinant of plant diversity. Recent work has shown that more accurate predictions of changes...

Reconstructing the historical fauna of a large continental island: a multispecies reintroduction risk analysis

Katie Peterson, Michael Bode, Cailan Jeynes-Smith, Megan Barnes, Cailan Jeynes-Smith, Saul Cowen, Lesley Gibson, Collen Sims, Christopher Baker & Michael Bode
1. Reintroduction projects, which are an important tool in threatened species conservation, are becoming more complex, often involving the translocation of multiple species. Ecological theory predicts that the sequence and timing of reintroductions will play an important role in their success or failure. Following the removal of sheep, goats and feral cats, the Western Australian government is sequentially reintroducing 13 native fauna species to restore the globally important natural and cultural values of Dirk Hartog...

Opposing community assembly patterns for dominant and non-dominant plant species in herbaceous ecosystems globally

Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Elizabeth Borer, Eric Seabloom, Juan Alberti, Selene Baez, Jonathon Bakker, Elizabeth Boughton, Yvonne Buckley, Miguel Bugalho, Ian Donohue, John Dwyer, Jennifer Firn, Riley Gridzak, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Aveliina Helm, Anke Jentsch, , Kimberly Komatsu, Lauri Laanisto, Ramesh Laungani, Rebecca McCulley, Joslin Moore, John Morgan, Pablo Peri … & Marc Cadotte
Biotic and abiotic factors interact with dominant plants —the locally most frequent or with the largest coverage— and non-dominant plants differently, partially because dominant plants modify the environment where non-dominant plants grow. For instance, if dominant plants compete strongly, they will deplete most resources, forcing non-dominant plants into a narrower niche space. Conversely, if dominant plants are constrained by the environment, they might not exhaust available resources but instead may ameliorate environmental stressors that usually...

Simulated cannabis days-of-use data

Mark Chambers & Christopher Drovandi
Background: The numbers of days that people consume alcohol and other drugs over a fixed time interval, such as 28 days, are often collected in surveys for research in the addictions field. The presence of an upper bound on these variables can result in response distributions with "ceiling effects". Also, if some peoples’ substance use behaviors are characterized by various weekly patterns of use, summaries of substance days-of-use over longer periods can exhibit multiple modes....

Data from: Genomic evidence for the parallel evolution of coastal forms in the Senecio lautus complex

Federico Roda, Luke Ambrose, Gregory M. Walter, Huanle L. Liu, Andrea Schaul, Andrew Lowe, Pieter B. Pelser, Peter Prentis, Loren H. Rieseberg & Daniel Ortiz-Barrientos
Instances of parallel ecotypic divergence where adaptation to similar conditions repeatedly cause similar phenotypic changes in closely related organisms are useful for studying the role of ecological selection in speciation. Here we used a combination of traditional and next generation genotyping techniques to test for the parallel divergence of plants from the Senecio lautus complex, a phenotypically variable groundsel that has adapted to disparate environments in the South Pacific. Phylogenetic analysis of a broad selection...

Data from: Evolutionary potential of the extrinsic incubation period of dengue virus in Aedes aegypti

Yixin H. Ye, Stephen F. Chenoweth, Alison M. Carrasco, Scott Lee Allen, Francesca D. Frentiu, Andrew F. Van Den Hurk, Nigel W. Beebe & Elizabeth A. McGraw
Dengue fever is the most common arboviral disease worldwide. It is caused by dengue viruses (DENV) and the mosquito Aedes aegypti is its primary vector. One of the most powerful determinants of a mosquito's ability to transmit DENV is the length of the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), the time it takes for a virus to be transmitted by a mosquito after consuming an infected blood meal. Here, we repeatedly measured DENV load in the saliva...

Data from: Mammalian herbivores affect leafhoppers associated with specific plant functional types at different timescales

Martijn L. Vandegehuchte, Valeria Trivellone, Martin Schütz, Jennifer Firn, Frederic De Schaetzen & Anita C. Risch
1. Theory predicts that mammalian herbivores affect the quantity and quality of plants on which they preferentially feed in the short term. In the longer term, they can promote either preferred or less preferred plants, depending on whether preferred plants are adapted or sensitive to grazing. Less clear are the short- and long-term responses of herbivorous insects to mammalian herbivory, and how these responses depend on the specific plants or plant functional types on which...

Data from: Herbivory and eutrophication mediate grassland plant nutrient responses across a global climatic gradient

T. Michael Anderson, Daniel M. Griffith, James B. Grace, Eric M. Lind, Peter B. Adler, Lori A. Biederman, Dana M. Blumenthal, Pedro Daleo, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Andrew S. MacDougall, Rebecca L. McCulley, Suzanne M. Prober, Anita C. Risch, Mahesh Sankaran, Martin Schütz, Eric W. Seabloom, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Peter D. Wragg & Elizabeth T. Borer
Plant stoichiometry, the relative concentration of elements, is a key regulator of ecosystem functioning and is also being altered by human activities. In this paper we sought to understand the global drivers of plant stoichiometry and compare the relative contribution of climatic vs. anthropogenic effects. We addressed this goal by measuring plant elemental (C, N, P and K) responses to eutrophication and vertebrate herbivore exclusion at eighteen sites on six continents. Across sites, climate and...

Data from: Netted crop covers reduce honey bee foraging activity and colony strength in a mass flowering crop

Lisa J. Evans, Brian T. Cutting, Mateusz Jochym, Milena A. Janke, Crystal Felman, Sarah Cross, Marine Jacob & Mark Goodwin
The widespread use of protective covers in horticulture represents a novel landscape-level change, presenting challenges for crop pollination. Honey bees (Apis mellifera L) are pollinators of many crops, but their behaviour can be affected by conditions under covers. To determine how netting crop covers can affect honey bee foraging dynamics, colony health, and pollination services, we assessed the performance of 52 nucleus honey bee colonies in five covered and six uncovered kiwifruit orchards. Colony strength...

Data from: Reconstructing the evolution of giant extinct kangaroos: comparing the utility of DNA, morphology, and total evidence

Manuela Cascini, Kieren J. Mitchell, Alan Cooper & Matthew J. Phillips
Combined “total evidence” analysis of molecular and morphological data offers the opportunity to objectively merge fossils into the tree of life, and challenges the primacy of solely DNA based phylogenetic and dating inference, even among modern taxa. To investigate the relative utility of DNA, morphology, and total evidence for evolutionary inference, we sequenced the first near-complete mitochondrial genomes from extinct Australian megafauna: a 40-50 thousand year old giant short-faced kangaroo (Simosthenurus occidentalis) and giant wallaby...

Data from: Passive acoustics and sound recognition provide new insights on status and resilience of an iconic endangered marsupial (koala Phascolarctos cinereus) to timber harvesting

Bradley S. Law, Traecey Brassil, Leroy Gonsalves, Paul Roe, Anthony Truskinger & Anna McConville
Retention forestry aims to mitigate impacts of native forestry on biodiversity, but data are limited on its effectiveness for threatened species. We used acoustics to investigate the resilience of a folivorous marsupial, the koala Phascolarctos cinereus, to timber harvesting where a key mitigation practice is landscape exclusion of harvesting. We deployed acoustic recorders at 171 sites to record male bellows (~14,640 hours) for use in occupancy modelling and for comparisons of bellow rate (bellows night-1)....

Hygroscopic growth and size distribution data for: In situ measurements of human cough aerosol hygroscopicity

Robert Groth, Luke Cravigan, Sadegh Niazi, Zoran Ristovski & Graham Johnson
The airborne dynamics of respiratory droplets, and the transmission routes of pathogens embedded within them, are governed primarily by the diameter of the particles. These particles are composed of the fluid which lines the respiratory tract, and is primarily mucins and salts, which will interact with the atmosphere and evaporate to reach an equilibrium diameter. Measuring organic volume fraction (OVF) of cough aerosol has proved challenging due to large variability and low material volume produced...

Sensing Science and Engineering Centre (SEC) Subsurface Data

This data consists of time stamped strain and extensometer data from the foundations of the Science and Engineering Centre (SEC) building on the Gardens Point campus of Queensland University of Technology. Twelve vibrating wire strain guages are mounted on sister bars to the steel reinforcement in the pile column report strain in four orientations (North, South, East and West) over three heights (Upper, Middle and Lower). This data is logged to a central server at...

ISIMIP3b ocean input data

Matthias Büchner
The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) provides a framework for the collation of a consistent set of climate impact data across sectors and scales. It also provides a unique opportunity for considering interactions between climate change impacts across sectors through consistent scenarios.
The ISIMIP3b part of the third simulation round is dedicated to a quantification of climate-related risks at different levels of global warming and socio-economic change. ISIMIP3b group I simulations are based on historical...

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