73 Works

Data from: Larval dispersal and fishing pressure influence recruitment in a coral reef fishery

Richard J. Hamilton, Diego Lozano-Cortés, Michael Bode, Glenn Almany, Hugo B. Harrison, John Pita, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Colin Gereniu, Nate Peterson, Howard Choat, Peter A. Waldie & Michael L. Berumen
Understanding larval connectivity patterns in exploited fishes is a fundamental prerequisite for developing effective management strategies and assessing the vulnerability of a fishery to recruitment overfishing and localised extinction. To date however, researchers have not considered how regional variations in fishing pressure also influence recruitment. We used genetic parentage analyses and modelling to infer the dispersal patterns of bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) larvae in the Kia fishing grounds, Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. We then extrapolated...

Individual variation in marine larval-fish swimming speed and the emergence of dispersal kernels

Scott Burgess, Michael Bode, Jeffrey Leis & Luciano Mason
Dispersal emerges as a consequence of how an individual’s phenotype interacts with the environment. Not all dispersing individuals have the same phenotype, and variation among individuals can generate complex variation in the distribution of dispersal distances and directions. While active locomotion performance is an obvious candidate for a dispersal phenotype, its effects on dispersal are difficult to measure or predict, especially in small organisms dispersing in wind or currents. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of...

Data from: Integrating local knowledge and research to refine the management of an invasive non-native grass in critically endangered grassy woodlands

Jennifer Firn, Emma Ladouceur & Josh Dorrough
1. Globally the prevalence and impact of invasive non-native plant species is increasing rapidly. Experimentally-based research aimed at supporting management is limited in its ability to keep up with this pace, partly because of the importance of understanding historical abiotic and biotic conditions. Contrastingly, landholders are in unique positions to witness species turnover in grasslands, adapt management practices in response, and learn from successes and failures. 2. This local knowledge could be crucial for identifying...

Data from: PolyPatEx: an R package for paternity exclusion in autopolyploids

Alexander B. Zwart, Carole Elliott, Tara Hopley, David Lovell & Andrew Young
Microsatellite markers have demonstrated their value for performing paternity exclusion and hence exploring mating patterns in plants and animals. Methodology is well established for diploid species and several software packages exist for elucidating paternity in diploids, however these issues are not so readily addressed in polyploids due to the increased complexity of the exclusion problem and a lack of available software. We introduce PolyPatEx, an R package for paternity exclusion analysis using microsatellite data in...

Data from: \"454 sequencing of reduced representation libraries to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Megabunus harvestmen\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 December 2013 to 31 January 2014

Gregor Wachter, Birgit Schlick-Steiner, Florian Steiner & Wolfgang Arthofer
Harvestmen or daddy longlegs (Opiliones) are the third-largest and one of the oldest arachnid groups, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in this order. Here we use next-generation sequencing of reduced representation libraries to establish nuclear DNA markers. To the best of our knowledge this dataset represents the largest genomic resource for Megabunus harvestmen available to date.

Data from: Self-deception in nonhuman animals: weak crayfish escalated aggression as if they were strong

Michael Angilletta, Gregory Kubitz & Robbie Wilson
Humans routinely deceive themselves when communicating to others, but no one knows whether other animals do the same. We ask whether dishonest signaling between crayfish meets a condition required for self-deception: dishonest individuals and honest individuals escalate aggression according to their signals of strength rather than actual strength. Using game theory, we predicted how an animal’s knowledge of its strength should affect its decision to escalate aggression. At the evolutionary equilibrium, an animal that knows...

Data from: Development and field validation of a regional, management-scale habitat model: a koala Phascolarctos cinereus case study

Bradley Law, Gabriele Caccamo, Paul Roe, Anthony Truskinger, Traecey Brassil, Leroy Gonsalves, Anna McConville & Matthew Stanton
Species distribution models have great potential to efficiently guide management for threatened species, especially for those that are rare or cryptic. We used MaxEnt to develop a regional-scale model for the koala Phascolarctos cinereus at a resolution (250 m) that could be used to guide management. To ensure the model was fit for purpose, we placed emphasis on validating the model using independently-collected field data. We reduced substantial spatial clustering of records in coastal urban...

Data from: Valuable habitat and low deforestation can reduce biodiversity gains from development rights markets

Kate J. Helmstedt & Matthew D. Potts
1. Illegal private land deforestation threatens global biodiversity, even in areas with native habitat requirements stipulated by law. Compliance can be improved by allowing landholders to meet legal reserve requirements by buying and selling the rights to have deforested land through a Tradeable Development Rights system (TDR). While this policy mechanism may prevent native habitat area loss, the spatial pattern of reserved areas will shift, creating novel landscape patterns. The resulting altered fragmentation and connectivity...

ISIMIP3b ocean input data

Matthias Büchner
The Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISIMIP) provides a framework for the collation of a consistent set of climate impact data across sectors and scales. It also provides a unique opportunity for considering interactions between climate change impacts across sectors through consistent scenarios.
The ISIMIP3b part of the third simulation round is dedicated to a quantification of climate-related risks at different levels of global warming and socio-economic change. ISIMIP3b group I simulations are based on historical...

Data from: \"Transcriptome sequencing of the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Diptera: Tephritidae)\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 December 2013 to 31 January 2014

Kumaran Nagalingam, Peter Prentis & A. R. Clarke
Contigs from Library 1An unannotated version of the trascriptome assembly (contigs and unigenes) is presented here.F-Contig.faContigs from Library 2An unannotated version of the trascriptome assembly (contigs and unigenes) is presented here.UF-Contig.faAll-UnigeneAn unannotated version of the trascriptome assembly (contigs and unigenes) is presented here.Sequence assembly and Contig annotationThe raw reads were used to generate a de novo assembly. High quality reads were then assembled into contigs and tese contigs were then further assembled into unigenes using...

Data from: Population structure of a global agricultural invasive pest, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Yu-Jia Qin, Matthew N. Krosch, Mark K. Schutze, Yue Zhang, Xiao-Xue Wang, Chandra S. Prabhakar, Agus Susanto, Alvin K.W. Hee, Sunday Ekesi, Kemo Badji, Mahfuza Khan, Yu-Bing Huang, Jia-Jiao Wu, Qiao-Ling Wang, Ge Yan, Li-Huan Zhu, Zi-Hua Zhao, Li-Jun Liu, Anthony R. Clarke, Zhi-Hong Li & Alvin K. W. Hee
Bactrocera dorsalis, the Oriental fruit fly, is one of the world’s most destructive agricultural insect pests and a major impediment to international fresh commodity trade. The genetic structuring of the species across its entire geographic range has never been undertaken, because under a former taxonomy B. dorsalis was divided into four distinct taxonomic entities, each with their own, largely non-overlapping, distributions. Based on the extensive sampling of six a priori groups from 63 locations, genetic...

Data from: The linking of plate tectonics and evolutionary divergences

Matthew J. Phillips, Timothy J. Page, Mark De Bruyn, Joel A. Huey, William F. Humphreys, Jane M. Hughes, Scott R. Santos, Daniel J. Schmidt & Jonathan M. Waters
It is exciting to be living at a time when the big questions in biology can be investigated using modern genetics and computing. Bauzà-Ribot et al. take on one of the fundamental drivers of biodiversity, the effect of continental drift in the formation of the world’s biota, employing next-generation sequencing of whole mitochondrial genomes and modern Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analysis. Bauzà-Ribot et al. conclude that vicariance via plate tectonics best explains the genetic divergence...

Data from: SRUD: a simple non-destructive method for accurate quantification of plant diversity dynamics

Pengfei Zhang, George A. Kowalchuk, Merel B. Soons, Mariet M. Hefting, Chengjin Chu, Jennifer Firn, Cynthia S. Brown, Xianhui Zhou, Xiaolong Zhou, Zhi Guo, Zhigang Zhao, Guozhen Du & Yann Hautier
1. Predicting changes in plant diversity in response to human activities represents one of the major challenges facing ecologists and land managers striving for sustainable ecosystem management. Classical field studies have emphasized the importance of community primary productivity in regulating changes in plant species richness. However, experimental studies have yielded inconsistent empirical evidence, suggesting that primary productivity is not the sole determinant of plant diversity. Recent work has shown that more accurate predictions of changes...

Data from: Using decision trees to understand structure in missing data

Nicholas J. Tierney, Fiona A. Harden, Maurice J. Harden & Kerrie L. Mengersen
Objectives: Demonstrate the application of decision trees—classification and regression trees (CARTs), and their cousins, boosted regression trees (BRTs)—to understand structure in missing data. Setting: Data taken from employees at 3 different industrial sites in Australia. Participants: 7915 observations were included. Materials and methods: The approach was evaluated using an occupational health data set comprising results of questionnaires, medical tests and environmental monitoring. Statistical methods included standard statistical tests and the ‘rpart’ and ‘gbm’ packages for...

Data from: Sexual selection in true fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae): transcriptome and experimental evidences for phytochemicals increasing male competitive ability

Nagalingam Kumaran, Peter J. Prentis, Kalimuthu Palanivel Mangalam, Mark K. Schutze & Anthony R. Clarke
In male tephritid fruit flies of the genus Bactrocera, feeding on secondary plant compounds (sensu lato male lures = methyl eugenol, raspberry ketone and zingerone) increases male mating success. Ingested male lures alter the male pheromonal blend, normally making it more attractive to females and this is considered the primary mechanism for the enhanced mating success. However, the male lures raspberry ketone and zingerone are known, across a diverse range of other organisms, to be...

Data from: Avian diversification patterns across the K-Pg boundary: influence of calibrations, datasets and model misspecification

Daniel T. Ksepka & Matthew J. Phillips
Birds represent the most diverse extant tetrapod clade, with ca. 10,000 extant species, and the timing of the crown avian radiation remains hotly debated. The fossil record supports a primarily Cenozoic radiation of crown birds, whereas molecular divergence dating analyses generally imply that this radiation was well underway during the Cretaceous. Furthermore, substantial differences have been noted between published divergence estimates. These have been variously attributed to clock model, calibration regime, and gene type. One...

Data from: Herbivores sculpt leaf traits differently in grasslands depending on life form and land-use histories

Jennifer Firn, Martin Schütz, Huong Nguyen & Anita C. Risch
Vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores alter plant communities directly by selectively consuming plant species; and indirectly by inducing morphological and physiological changes to plant traits that provide competitive or survivorship advantages to some life forms over others. Progressively excluding aboveground herbivore communities (ungulates, medium and small sized mammals, invertebrates) over five growing seasons, we explored how leaf morphology (specific leaf area or SLA) and nutrition (nitrogen, carbon, phosphorous, potassium, sodium, and calcium) of different plant life...

Effect of tomato-fruit cultivar and ripening stage on Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) egg and larval survival

Shirin Roohigohar
In studies of frugivorous tephritids, determining when offspring (i.e. egg and three larval instars) mortality occurs within the fruit can greatly improve the mechanistic understanding of the fly/host interaction. Previous research has demonstrated that the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, has differential offspring performance in two tomato cultivars Cherry and Roma, but when juvenile mortality was occurring was not determined. We examined B. tryoni egg and larval survival in three different ripening stages (immature-green (IG),...

Reconstructing the historical fauna of a large continental island: a multispecies reintroduction risk analysis

Katie Peterson, Michael Bode, Cailan Jeynes-Smith, Megan Barnes, Cailan Jeynes-Smith, Saul Cowen, Lesley Gibson, Collen Sims, Christopher Baker & Michael Bode
1. Reintroduction projects, which are an important tool in threatened species conservation, are becoming more complex, often involving the translocation of multiple species. Ecological theory predicts that the sequence and timing of reintroductions will play an important role in their success or failure. Following the removal of sheep, goats and feral cats, the Western Australian government is sequentially reintroducing 13 native fauna species to restore the globally important natural and cultural values of Dirk Hartog...

Vegetation structure and ground cover attributes describe the occurrence of a newly discovered carnivorous marsupial on the Tweed Shield Volcano caldera, the endangered black-tailed dusky antechinus (Antechinus arktos).

Coral Pearce, Caitlin Riordan, W. McDonald, Ian Gynther & Andrew Baker
The black-tailed dusky antechinus (Antechinus arktos) is a recently discovered, endangered, carnivorous marsupial mammal endemic to the Tweed Shield Volcano caldera, straddling the border between Queensland and New South Wales in eastern Australia. The species’ preference for cool, high altitude habitats makes it particularly vulnerable to a shifting climate as these habitats recede. Aside from basic breeding ecology and dietary patterns the species’ biology is largely unknown. Understanding fine scale habitat attributes preferred by this...

Data from: Perioperative medication management: expanding the role of the preadmission clinic pharmacist in a single centre, randomised controlled trial of collaborative prescribing

Andrew R. Hale, Ian D. Coombes, Julie Stokes, David McDougall, Karen Whitfield, Elizabeth Maycock & Lisa Nissen
Objectives: Current evidence to support non-medical prescribing is predominantly qualitative, with little evaluation of accuracy, safety and appropriateness. Our aim was to evaluate a new model of service for the Australia healthcare system, of inpatient medication prescribing by a pharmacist in an elective surgery pre admission clinic (PAC) against usual care, using an endorsed performance framework. Design: Single centre, randomised controlled, two arm trial Setting: Elective surgery pre admission clinic in Brisbane based tertiary hospital...

Data from: Without management interventions, endemic wet-sclerophyll forest is transitioning to rainforest in World Heritage listed K’gari (Fraser Island), Australia

Vithya Krishnan, Nicole Robinson, Jennifer Firn, Grahame Applegate, John Herbohn & Susanne Schmidt
Wet-sclerophyll forests are unique ecosystems that can transition to dry-sclerophyll forests or to rainforests. Understanding of the dynamics of these forests for conservation is limited. We evaluated the long-term succession of wet-sclerophyll forest on World Heritage listed K’gari (Fraser Island)the world’s largest sand island. We recorded the presence and growth of tree species in three 0.4 hectare plots that had been subjected to selective logging, fire, and cyclone disturbance over 65 years, from 1952 to...

Data from: Internal and external cooling methods and their effect on body temperature, thermal perception and dexterity

Matthew J. Maley, Geoffrey M. Minett, Aaron J.E. Bach, Stephani A. Zietek, Kelly L. Stewart, Ian B. Stewart, Aaron J. E. Bach & Stephanie A. Zietek
Objective: The present study aimed to compare a range of cooling methods possibly utilised by occupational workers, focusing on their effect on body temperature, perception and manual dexterity. Methods: Ten male participants completed eight trials involving 30 min of seated rest followed by 30 min of cooling or control of no cooling (CON) (34 °C, 58 % relative humidity). The cooling methods utilised were: ice cooling vest (CV0), phase change cooling vest melting at 14...

Data from: A multi-genome analysis approach enables tracking of the invasion of a single Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia) clone throughout the New World

Le Kang, Bo Zhang, Susan Fuller & Owain Edwards
This study investigated the population genetics, demographic history and pathway of invasion of the Russian wheat aphid (RWA) from its native range in Central Asia, the Middle East and Europe to South Africa and the Americas. We screened microsatellite markers, mitochondrial DNA, and endosymbiont genes in 504 RWA clones from nineteen populations worldwide. Following pathway analyses of microsatellite and endosymbiont data, we postulate that Turkey and Syria were the most likely sources of invasion to...

Data from: Using virtual reality to estimate aesthetic values of coral reefs

Julie Vercelloni, Sam Clifford, M. Julian Caley, Alan R. Pearse, Ross Brown, Allan James, Bryce Christensen, Tomasz Bednarz, Ken Anthony, Manuel González-Rivero, Kerrie Mengersen & Erin E. Peterson
Aesthetic value, or beauty, is important to the relationship between humans and natural environments and is, therefore, a fundamental socioeconomic attribute of conservation alongside other ecosystem services. However, beauty is difficult to quantify and is not estimated well using traditional approaches to monitoring coral reef aesthetics. To improve the estimation of ecosystem aesthetic values, we developed and implemented a novel framework used to quantify features of coral reef aesthetics based on people’s perceptions of beauty....

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