12 Works

Data from: Social effects on foraging behaviour and success depend on local environmental conditions

Harry H. Marshall, Alecia J. Carter, Alexandra Ashford, J. Marcus Rowcliffe & Guy Cowlishaw
In social groups, individuals' dominance rank, social bonds, and kinship with other group members have been shown to influence their foraging behavior. However, there is growing evidence that the particular effects of these social traits may also depend on local environmental conditions. We investigated this by comparing the foraging behavior of wild chacma baboons, Papio ursinus, under natural conditions and in a field experiment where food was spatially clumped. Data were collected from 55 animals...

Data from: Testing hypotheses of mitochondrial gene-tree paraphyly: unraveling mitochondrial capture of the Streak-breasted Scimitar Babbler (Pomatorhinus ruficollis) by the Taiwan Scimitar Babbler (P. musicus)

Feng Dong, Fa-Sheng Zou, Fu-Min Lei, Wei Liang, Shou-Hsien Li & Xiao-Jun Yang
Species-level paraphyly inferred from mitochondrial gene trees is a prevalent phenomenon in taxonomy and systematics, but there are several potential causes that are not easily explained by currently used methods. The present study aims to test the underlying causes behind the observed paraphyly of Streak-breasted Scimitar Babbler (Pomatorhinus ruficollis) via statistical analyses of four mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nine nuclear (nuDNA) genes. Mitochondrial gene trees show paraphyly of P. ruficollis with respect to the Taiwan Scimitar...

Data from: A multi-genome analysis approach enables tracking of the invasion of a single Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia) clone throughout the New World

Le Kang, Bo Zhang, Susan Fuller & Owain Edwards
This study investigated the population genetics, demographic history and pathway of invasion of the Russian wheat aphid (RWA) from its native range in Central Asia, the Middle East and Europe to South Africa and the Americas. We screened microsatellite markers, mitochondrial DNA, and endosymbiont genes in 504 RWA clones from nineteen populations worldwide. Following pathway analyses of microsatellite and endosymbiont data, we postulate that Turkey and Syria were the most likely sources of invasion to...

Data from: Automated DNA-based plant identification for large-scale biodiversity assessment

Anna Papadopoulou, Douglas Chesters, Indiana Coronado, Gissela De La Cadena, Anabela Cardoso, Jazmina C. Reyes, Jean-Michel Maes, Ricardo M. Rueda & Jesús Gómez-Zurita
Rapid degradation of tropical forests urges to improve our efficiency in large-scale biodiversity assessment. DNA-barcoding can assist greatly in this task, but commonly used phenetic approaches for DNA-based identifications rely on the existence of comprehensive reference databases, which are infeasible for hyperdiverse tropical ecosystems. Alternatively, phylogenetic methods are more robust to sparse taxon sampling but time-consuming, while multiple alignment of species-diagnostic, typically length-variable markers can be problematic across divergent taxa. We advocate the combination of...

Data from: Sexually selected dichromatism in the hihi Notiomystis cincta: multiple colours for multiple receivers

Leila K. Walker, John G. Ewen, Patricia Brekke & Rebecca M. Kilner
Why do some bird species show dramatic sexual dichromatism in their plumage? Sexual selection is the most common answer to this question. However, other competing explanations mean it is unwise to assume that all sexual dichromatism has evolved by this mechanism. Even if sexual selection is involved, further work is necessary to determine whether dichromatism results from competition amongst rival males, or by female choice for attractive traits, or both. Here we test whether sexually...

Data from: Habitat-driven population structure of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, in the North-East Atlantic

Marie Louis, Amélia Viricel, Tamara Lucas, Hélène Peltier, Eric Alfonsi, Simon Berrow, Andrew Brownlow, Pablo Covelo, Willy Dabin, Rob Deaville, Renaud De Stephanis, François Gally, Pauline Gauffier, Rod Penrose, Monica A. Silva, Christophe Guinet & Benoît Simon-Bouhet
Despite no obvious barrier to gene flow, historical environmental processes and ecological specializations can lead to genetic differentiation in highly mobile animals. Ecotypes emerged in several large mammal species as a result of niche specializations and/or social organization. In the North-West Atlantic, two distinct bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) ecotypes (i.e. ‘coastal’ and ‘pelagic’) have been identified. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure of North-East Atlantic (NEA) bottlenose dolphins on a large scale through the...

Data from: Climate niche differentiation between two passerines despite ongoing gene flow

Shou-Hsien Li, Pei-Jen L. Shaner, Tzu-Hsuan Tsao, Rong-Chien Lin, Wei Liang, Chia-Fen Yeh, Xiao-Jun Yang, Fu-Min Lei, Fang Zhou, Can-Chao Yang & Yu-Cheng Hsu
Niche evolution underpins the generation and maintenance of biological diversity, but niche conservatism, in which niches remain little changed over time in closely related taxa and the role of ecology in niche evolution are continually debated. To test whether climate niches are conserved in two closely related passerines in East Asia – the vinous-throated (Paradoxornis webbianus) and ashy-throated (P. alphonsianus) parrotbills – we established their potential allopatric and sympatric regions using ecological niche models and...

Data from: Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal

Elise Huchard, Anne Charmantier, Sinead English, Andrew Bateman, Johanna F. Nielsen & Tim Clutton-Brock
Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a...

Data from: Heat shock protein expression enhances heat tolerance of reptile and bird embryos

Jing Gao, Wen Zhang, Wei Dang, Yi Mou, Yuan Gao, Bao-Jun Sun, Wei-Guo Du, W.-G. Du & B.-J. Sun
The role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in heat tolerance has been demonstrated in cultured cells and animal tissues, but rarely in whole organisms because of methodological difficulties associated with gene manipulation. By comparing HSP70 expression patterns among representative species of reptiles and birds, and by determining the effect of HSP70 overexpression on embryonic development and hatchling traits, we have identified the role of HSP70 in the heat tolerance of amniote embryos. Consistent with their...

Data from: A protocol for species delineation of public DNA databases, applied to the Insecta

Douglas Chesters & Chao-Dong Zhu
Public DNA databases are composed of data from many different taxa, although the taxonomic annotation on sequences is not always complete, which impedes the utilization of mined data for species-level applications. There is much ongoing work on species identification and delineation based on the molecular data itself, although applying species clustering to whole databases requires consolidation of results from numerous undefined gene regions, and introduces significant obstacles in data organization and computational load. In the...

Data from: Estimation of migration rates from marker based parentage analysis

Jinliang Wang
Coupled with rapid developments of efficient genetic markers, powerful population genetics methods were proposed to estimate migration rates (m) in natural populations in much broader spatial and temporal scales than the traditional mark-release-recapture (MRR) methods. Highly polymorphic (e.g. microsatellites) and genomic wide (e.g. SNPs) markers provide sufficient information to assign individuals to their populations or parents of origin, and thereby to estimate directly m in a way similar to MRR. Such direct estimates of current...

Data from: Evidence for varying social strategies across the day in chacma baboons

Claudia Sick, Alecia J. Carter, Harry H. Marshall, Leslie A. Knapp, Torben Dabelsteen & Guy Cowlishaw
Strong social bonds can make an important contribution to individual fitness, but we still have only a limited understanding of the temporal period relevant to the adjustment of social relationships. While there is growing recognition of the importance of strong bonds that persist for years, social relationships can also vary over weeks and months, suggesting that social strategies may be optimized over shorter timescales. Using biological market theory as a framework, we explore whether temporal...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Zoological Society of London
    12
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Hainan Normal University
    2
  • Kunming Institute of Zoology
    2
  • National Taiwan Normal University
    2
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • National Dong Hwa University
    1
  • LIttoral, ENvironment and Societies
    1
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    1