26 Works

Data from: Molecular phylogeny and dating reveal a terrestrial origin in the early Carboniferous for ascaridoid nematodes

Liang Li, Liang Lü, Steven A. Nadler, David I. Gibson, Lu-Ping Zhang, Hui-Xia Chen, Wen-Ting Zhao & Yan-Ning Guo
Ascaridoids are among the commonest groups of zooparasitic nematodes (roundworms) and occur in the alimentary canal of all major vertebrate groups, including man. They have an extremely high diversity and are of major socio-economic importance. However, their evolutionary history remains poorly known. Here we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the Ascaridoidea. Our results divided the Ascaridoidea into six monophyletic major clades, i.e. the Heterocheilidae, Acanthocheilidae, Anisakidae, Ascarididae, Toxocaridae and Raphidascarididae, among which the Heterocheilidae,...

Data from: Signatures of human-commensalism in the house sparrow genome

Mark Ravinet, Tore Oldeide Elgvin, Cassandra Trier, Mansour Aliabadian, Andrey Gavrilov & Glenn-Peter Sætre
House sparrows (Passer domesticus) are a hugely successful anthrodependent species; occurring on nearly every continent. Yet, despite their ubiquity and familiarity to humans, surprisingly little is known about their origins. We sought to investigate the evolutionary history of the house sparrow and identify the processes involved in its transition to a human-commensal niche. We used a whole genome resequencing dataset of 120 individuals from three Eurasian species, including three populations of Bactrianus sparrows, a non-commensal,...

Data from: Can threatened species adapt in restored habitat? No expected evolutionary response in lay date for the New Zealand hihi

Pierre De Villemereuil, Alexis Rutschmann, John G. Ewen, Anna W. Santure, Patricia Brekke & Pierre Villemereuil
Many bird species have been observed shifting their laying date to earlier in the year in response to climate change. However the vast majority of these studies were performed on non-threatened species, less impacted by reduced genetic diversity (which is expected to limit evolutionary response) as a consequence of genetic bottlenecks, drift and population isolation. Here we study the relationship between lay date and fitness, as well as its genetic basis, to understand the evolutionary...

Data from: Risk of cache pilferage determines hoarding behavior of rodents and seed fate

Lin Cao, Bo Wang, Chuan Yan, Zhenyu Wang, Hongmao Zhang, Yuanzhao Geng, Jin Chen & Zhibin Zhang
Cache pilferage by competitors is thought to drive the evolution of hoarding behavior in animals, which plays significant roles in tree regeneration and formation of mutualisms between trees and animals. However, little is known how cache pilferage risk among seeds of different tree species or years affects hoarding behavior and seed dispersal by animals. We hypothesized that scatter-hoarding rodents could adjust hoarding behavior according to variation in cache pilferage risk among seeds and years to...

Data from: Chemically-mediated sexual signals restrict hybrid speciation in a flea beetle

Huai-Jun Xue, Kari A. Segraves, Jing Wei, Bin Zhang, Rui-E Nie, Wen-Zhu Li & Xing-Ke Yang
The evolution of reproductive isolation following hybridization is a major obstacle that may limit the prevalence of hybrid speciation among specific groups of organisms. Here we use a flea beetle system to offer a behavioral hypothesis for why there are so few examples of homoploid hybrid speciation among insects. Specifically, we examined cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) mating signals and mate choice decisions of Altica fragariae and A. viridicyanea to test whether the signals produced by hybrids...

Data from: Transcriptomic analysis of skin pigmentation variation in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

Sergio F. Nigenda-Morales, Yibo Hu, James Beasley, Hugo A. Ruiz-Piña, David Valenzuela-Galván, Robert K. Wayne & James C. Beasley
Skin and coat pigmentation are two of the best-studied examples of traits under natural selection given their quantifiable fitness interactions with the environment (e.g. camouflage) and signaling with other organisms (e.g. warning coloration). Previous morphological studies have found that skin pigmentation variation in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is associated with variation in precipitation and temperatures across its distribution range following Gloger’s rule (lighter pigmentation in temperate environments). To investigate the molecular mechanism associated with...

Data from: A global test of the cold-climate hypothesis for the evolution of viviparity of squamate reptiles

Liang Ma, Lauren B. Buckley, Raymond B. Huey & Wei-Guo Du
Aim The evolution of viviparity in squamate reptiles has attracted considerable scientific attention since the beginning of last century. The cold climate hypothesis posits that cold regions favor viviparity (and therefore the incidence of viviparous squamates is increased in these regions) because viviparous females can use thermoregulatory behavior to shorten embryonic developmental time and to reduce exposure of embryos to stressful temperatures. However, a rigorous global-scale test of the impact of viviparity on the developmental...

Data from: Comparing genetic diversity and demographic history in co-distributed wild South American camelids

Ciara S. Casey, Pablo Orozco-TerWengel, Katherine Yaya, Miranda Kadwell, Matilde Fernández, Juan Carlos Marin, Raul Rosadio, Lenin Maturrano, Domingo Hoces, Yibo Hu, Jane C. Wheeler & Michael W. Bruford
Vicuñas and guanacos are two species of wild South American camelids that are key ruminants in the ecosystems where they occur. Although closely related, these species feature differing ecologies and life history characters, which are expected to influence both their genetic diversity and population differentiation at different spatial scales. Here, using mitochondrial and microsatellite genetic markers, we show that vicuña display lower genetic diversity within populations than guanaco but exhibit more structure across their Peruvian...

Data from: Abundance of small mammals correlates with their elevational range sizes and elevational distributions in the subtropics

Zhixin Wen, Yongjie Wu, Jilong Cheng, Tianlong Cai, Yuanbao Du, Deyan Ge, Lin Xia & Qisen Yang
The idea that a positive abundance-range size relationship (ARR) is pervasive in nature has been challenged by recent studies focused on montane and island vertebrate assemblages. However, because some of these studies used species’ local abundance and regional or global range size in examining the ARRs, the negative and neutral trends reported are questionable. Here, by relating species’ mean abundance along elevational gradients to elevational range size, we examined the ARRs of non-flying small mammals...

Data from: Evolution of longevity improves immunity in Drosophila

Daniel K. Fabian, Kathrin Garschall, Peter Klepsatel, Gonçalo Santos-Matos, Élio Sucena, Martin Kapun, Bruno Lemaitre, Robert Arking, Christian Schloetterer & Thomas Flatt
Much has been learned about the genetics of aging from studies in model organisms, but still little is known about naturally occurring alleles that contribute to variation in longevity. For example, analysis of mutants and transgenes has identified insulin signaling as a major regulator of longevity, yet whether standing variation in this pathway underlies microevolutionary changes in lifespan and correlated fitness traits remains largely unclear. Here we have analyzed the genomes of a set of...

Data from: An evaluation of transferability of ecological niche models

Huijie Qiao, Xiao Feng, Luis E. Escobar, A. Townsend Peterson, Jorge Soberon, Gengping Zhu & Monica Papeș
Ecological niche modeling (ENM) is used widely to study species’ geographic distributions. ENM applications frequently involve transferring models calibrated with environmental data from one region to other regions or times that may include novel environmental conditions. When novel conditions are present, transferability implies extrapolation, whereas, in absence of such conditions, transferability is an interpolation step only. We evaluated transferability of models produced using 11 ENM algorithms from the perspective of interpolation and extrapolation in a...

Data from: Walking in a heterogeneous landscape: dispersal, gene-flow and conservation implications for the giant panda in the Qinling Mountains

Tianxiao Ma, Yibo Hu, Isa-Rita Russo, Yonggang Nie, Tianyou Yang, Lijuan Xiong, Shuai Ma, Tao Meng, Han Han, Ximing Zhang, Mike W. Bruford, Fuwen Wei, Isa-Rita M. Russo & Michael W. Bruford
Understanding the interaction between life history, demography and population genetics in threatened species is critical for the conservations of viable populations. In the context of habitat loss and fragmentation, identifying the factors that underpin the structuring of genetic variation within populations can allow conservationists to evaluate habitat quality and connectivity and help to design dispersal corridors effectively. In this study, we carried out a detailed, fine-scale landscape genetic investigation of a giant panda population for...

Data from: Inter-annual dynamics and persistence of small mammal communities in a selectively logged tropical forest in Borneo

Philip M. Chapman, Oliver R. Wearn, Terhi Riutta, Chris Carbone, J. Marcus Rowcliffe, Henry Bernard, Robert M Ewers & Robert. M. Ewers
Understanding temporal change and long-term persistence of species and communities is vital if we are to accurately assess the relative values of human-modified habitats for biodiversity. Despite a large literature and emerging consensus demonstrating a high conservation value of selectively logged tropical rainforests, few studies have taken a long-term perspective. We resampled small mammals (≤1kg) in a heavily logged landscape in Sabah, Borneo between 2011 and 2016 to investigate temporal patterns of species-level changes in...

Data from: A novel method for using ecoacoustics to monitor post‐translocation behaviour in an endangered passerine

Oliver C. Metcalf, John G. Ewen, Mhairi McCready, Emma M. Williams & J. Marcus Rowcliffe
1. Conservation translocations are an important tool in wildlife management, but have traditionally suffered from a low success rate. Increasing understanding of animal behaviour is vital in improving the success of translocations, but few methods exist to efficiently monitor highly mobile and cryptic species post-release. 2. We present a novel approach to using dynamic occupancy modelling in combination with data derived from autonomous acoustic recording units to monitor the post-release behaviour of hihi (Notiomystis cincta),...

Data from: The Gambian epauletted fruit bat shows increased genetic divergence in the Ethiopian highlands and in an area of rapid urbanisation

Silke A. Riesle-Sbarbaro, Kofi Amponsah-Mensah, Stefan De Vries, Violaine Nicolas, Aude Lalis, Richard Suu-Ire, Andrew A. Cunningham, James L.N. Wood, David R. Sargan & James L. N. Wood
The Gambian epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus gambianus) is an abundant species that roosts in both urban and rural settings. The possible role of E. gambianus as a reservoir host of zoonotic diseases underlines the need to better understand the species movement patterns. So far, neither observational nor phylogenetic studies have identified the dispersal range or behaviour of this species. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear markers from 20 localities across the known distribution of E....

Data from: Non-adaptive female pursuit of extra-pair copulations can evolve through hitchhiking

Nan Lyu, Maria R. Servedio & Yue-Hua Sun
Mounting evidence has indicated that engaging in extra-pair copulations (EPCs) might be maladaptive or detrimental to females. It is unclear why such non-adaptive female behavior evolves. In this study, we test two hypotheses about the evolution of female EPC behavior using population genetic models. First, we find that both male preference for allocating extra-effort to seek EPCs and female pursuit behavior without costs can be maintained and remain polymorphic in a population via frequency dependent...

Data from: Phenology and the physiological niche are co-adapted in a desert dwelling lizard

Bao-Jun Sun, Liang Ma, Shu-Ran Li, Caroline M. Williams, Yang Wang, Xin Hao & Wei-Guo Du
1. A major goal of seasonal biology is to understand how selection on phenology and the physiological niche interact. In oviparous species, fitness variation across the growing season suggests that phenological shifts will alter selective environments experienced by embryos. We hypothesize that physiology could become co-adapted with phenology; such that embryos perform better in the environmental conditions they are adapted to compared to embryos adapted to other environments (temporal matching). 2. Here, we tested for...

Data from: Individual consumption of supplemental food as a predictor of reproductive performance and viral infection intensity

Simon Tollington, John G. Ewen, Jason Newton, Rona A.R. McGill, Donal Smith, Aurélie Henshaw, Deborah J. Fogell, Vikash Tatayah, Andrew Greenwood, Carl G. Jones & Jim J. Groombridge
1.Supplemental food is often provided to threatened species in order to maintain or enhance reproductive fitness and thus population growth. However, its impact on individual reproductive fitness is rarely evaluated, despite being associated with both positive and negative consequences. 2. We used stable isotope analyses to characterise the relative proportional consumption of supplemental food and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to assess beak and feather disease viral infection intensity among parakeets. Life-history and nest-site data...

Data from: Ecological correlates of Himalayan musk deer Moschus leucogaster

Paras Bikram Singh, Pradip Saud, Kumar Mainali, Doug Cram, Arjun Thapa, Nar Bahadur Chhetri, Laxman P. Poudyal, Hem Sagar Baral, Zhigang Jiang & Douglas Cram
Himalayan musk deer (Moschus leucogaster; hereafter musk deer) are endangered as a result of poaching and habitat loss. The species is nocturnal, crepuscular and elusive, making direct observation of habitat use and behavior difficult. However, musk deer establish and repeatedly use the same latrines for defecation. To quantify musk deer habitat correlates, we used observational spatial data based on presence-absence of musk deer latrines, as well as a range of fine spatial-scale ecological covariates. To...

Data from: Historical data for conservation: reconstructing range changes of Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) in eastern China (1970-2016)

Li Yang, Minhao Chen, Daniel W.S. Challender, Carly Waterman, Chao Zhang, Zhaomin Huo, Hongwei Liu & Xiaofeng Luan
The Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) has long suffered from intense exploitation driven by consumer demand for medicinal use and food. Effective conservation management is hampered by insufficient data on pangolin status and distribution. We integrated ecological niche modeling with long-term ecological records at the local scale (e.g. from local historical documents, grey and published literature and interviews) to estimate the magnitude of potential distribution change of the Chinese pangolin in eastern China (Fujian, Jiangxi and...

Data from: Rewilding in the English Uplands: policy and practice

Christopher J. Sandom, Benedict Dempsey, David Bullock, Adrian Ely, Paul Jepson, Stefan Jimenez-Wisler, Adrian Newton, Nathalie Pettorelli & Rebecca A. Senior
Rewilding is gaining momentum as a new approach to restore and conserve biodiversity and ecosystem services, despite being imprecisely defined, controversial, and with limited explicit empirical supporting evidence (Lorimer et al., 2015; Pettorelli et al., 2018; Svenning et al., 2016). In a case study region (the English uplands), we discuss what rewilding means to practitioners and policy makers; the risks, opportunities, and barriers to implementation, and potential paths for policy and practice.

Data from: Comparison of methods for molecular species delimitation across a range of speciation scenarios

Arong Luo, Cheng Ling, Simon Y.W. Ho, Chao-Dong Zhu & Simon Y W Ho
Species are fundamental units in biological research and can be defined on the basis of various operational criteria. There has been growing use of molecular approaches for species delimitation. Among the most widely used methods, the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) and Poisson tree processes (PTP) were designed for the analysis of single-locus data but are often applied to concatenations of multilocus data. In contrast, the Bayesian multispecies coalescent approach in the software BPP explicitly models...

Data from: Predator size and prey size-gut capacity ratios determine kill frequency and carcass production in terrestrial carnivorous mammals

Annelies De Cuyper, Marcus Clauss, Chris Carbone, Daryl Codron, An Cools, Myriam Hesta & Geert P. J. Janssens
Carnivore kill frequency is a fundamental part of predator-prey interactions, which are important shapers of ecosystems. Current field kill frequency data are rare and existing models are insufficiently adapted to carnivore functional groups. We developed a kill frequency model accounting for carnivore mass, prey mass, pack size, partial consumption of prey and carnivore gut capacity. Two main carnivore functional groups, small prey-feeders vs large prey-feeders, were established based on the relationship between stomach capacity (C)...

Data from: Isolation and no-entry marine reserves mitigate anthropogenic impacts on grey reef shark behavior

Jean-Baptiste Juhel, Laurent Vigliola, Laurent Wantiez, Tom B. Letessier, Jessica J. Meeuwig & David Mouillot
Reef sharks are vulnerable predators experiencing severe population declines mainly due to overexploitation. However, beyond direct exploitation, human activities can produce indirect or sub-lethal effects such as behavioral alterations. Such alterations are well known for terrestrial fauna but poorly documented for marine species. Using an extensive sampling of 367 stereo baited underwater videos systems, we show modifications in grey reef shark (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) occurrence and feeding behavior along a marked gradient of isolation from humans...

Data from: A novel approach to wildlife transcriptomics provides evidence of disease-mediated differential expression and changes to the microbiome of amphibian populations

Lewis J. Campbell, Stewart A. Hammond, Stephen J. Price, Manmohan D. Sharma, Trenton W.J. Garner, Inanc Birol, Caren C. Helbing, Lena Wilfert, Amber G.F. Griffiths & Trenton W. J. Garner
Ranaviruses are responsible for a lethal, emerging infectious disease in amphibians and threaten their populations throughout the world. Despite this, little is known about how amphibian populations respond to ranaviral infection. In the United Kingdom, ranaviruses impact the common frog (Rana temporaria). Extensive public engagement in the study of ranaviruses in the UK has led to the formation of a unique system of field sites containing frog populations of known ranaviral disease history. Within this...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26

Affiliations

  • Zoological Society of London
    26
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    8
  • University of Chinese Academy of Sciences
    6
  • Institute of Zoology
    3
  • Sichuan University
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University College London
    2
  • Cardiff University
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2