9 Works

Predicting harvest impact and establishment success when translocating highly mobile and endangered species

Johannes Fischer, Heiko Wittmer, Caio Kenup, Kevin Parker, Rosalind Cole, Igor Debski, Graeme Taylor, John Ewen & Doug Armstrong
Harvesting individuals for translocations can negatively impact source populations, a critical challenge for species reduced to small populations. Consequently, translocation cohorts often remain small, reducing the establishment probability at the destination. Balancing the potential benefits and risks of such translocations is further complicated by philopatry and natural metapopulation dynamics if the target species is highly mobile. These challenges highlight the importance of translocation feasibility assessments, but such assessments often remain qualitative to date. The critically...

Roosting behavior and roost selection by Epomophorus gambianus (Pteropodidae) in a west African rural landscape

Kofi Amponsah-Mensah, Andrew A. Cunningham, James L. N. Wood & Yaa Ntiamoa-Baidu
Urbanization is driving many species to inhabit modified landscapes, but our understanding of how species respond to this remains limited. Bats are particularly vulnerable due to their life-history traits but have received little attention. We describe the roosting behavior and roost site selection, including maternity roosts, for the Gambian epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus gambianus) within a modified forest-savannah transition ecological zone in Ghana, West Africa. We compared characteristics of roost and non-roost sites to test...

Laying low: Rugged lowland rainforest preferred by feral cats in the Australian wet tropics

Tom Bruce, Stephen Williams, Rajan Amin, Felicity L’Hotellier & Ben Hirsch
Invasive mesopredators are responsible for the decline of many species of native mammals worldwide. Feral cats have been causally linked to multiple extinctions of Australian mammals since European colonisation. While feral cats are found throughout Australia, most research has been undertaken in arid habitats, thus there is a limited understanding of feral cat distribution, abundance, and ecology in Australian tropical rainforests. We carried out camera-trapping surveys at 108 locations across seven study sites, spanning 200...

Evolutionary determinants of non-seasonal breeding in wild chacma baboons

Jules Dezeure, Lugdiwine Burtschell, Alice Baniel, Alecia J. Carter, Bernard Godelle, Cowlishaw Guy & Huchard Elise
Animal reproductive phenology varies from strongly seasonal to non-seasonal, sometimes among closely related or sympatric species. While the extent of reproductive seasonality is often attributed to environmental seasonality, this fails to explain many cases of non-seasonal breeding in seasonal environments. We investigated the evolutionary determinants of non-seasonal breeding in a wild primate, the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus), living in a seasonal environment with high climatic unpredictability. We tested three hypotheses proposing that non-seasonal breeding has...

Data from: Network analysis of sea turtle movements and connectivity: a tool for conservation prioritization

Connie Y. Kot, Susanne Åkesson, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, Diego Fernando Amorocho Llanos, Marina Antonopoulou, George H. Balazs, Warren R. Baverstock, Janice M. Blumenthal, Annette C. Broderick, Ignacio Bruno, Ali Fuat Canbolat, Paolo Casale, Daniel Cejudo, Michael S. Coyne, Corrie Curtice, Sarah DeLand, Andrew DiMatteo, Kara Dodge, Daniel C. Dunn, Nicole Esteban, Angela Formia, Mariana M. P. B. Fuentes, Ei Fujioka, Julie Garnier, Matthew H. Godfrey … & Patrick N. Halpin
Aim: Understanding the spatial ecology of animal movements is a critical element in conserving long-lived, highly mobile marine species. Analysing networks developed from movements of six sea turtle species reveals marine connectivity and can help prioritize conservation efforts. Location: Global. Methods: We collated telemetry data from 1,235 individuals and reviewed the literature to determine our dataset’s representativeness. We used the telemetry data to develop spatial networks at different scales to examine areas, connections, and their...

No evidence for trade-offs between bird diversity, yield and water table depth on oil palm smallholdings: implications for tropical peatland landscape restoration

Eleanor Warren-Thomas, Fahmuddin Agus, Panji Akbar, Merry Crowson, Keith Hamer, Bambang Hariyadi, Jenny Hodgson, Winda Kartika, Mailys Lopes, Jennifer Lucey, Dedy Mustaqim, Nathalie Pettorelli, Asmadi Saad, Widia Sari, Gita Sukma, Lindsay Stringer, Caroline Ward & Jane Hill
Tropical peat swamp forests retain large carbon stocks and support unique biodiversity, but clearance and drainage for agriculture have resulted in fires, carbon emissions and biodiversity losses. Initiatives to re-wet cultivated peatlands may benefit biodiversity if this protects remaining forests from fire and agricultural encroachment, but there are concerns that re-wetting could reduce yields and damage livelihoods, as relationships between drainage, on-farm biodiversity, and crop yields have not been studied. We examined oil palm fruit...

Individual repeatability of avian migration phenology: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Kirsty Franklin, Malcolm Nicoll, Simon Butler, Ken Norris, Norman Ratcliffe, Shinichi Nakagawa & Jennifer Gill
Changes in phenology and distribution are being widely reported for many migratory species in response to shifting environmental conditions. Understanding these changes and the situations in which they occur can be aided by understanding consistent individual differences in phenology and distribution and the situations in which consistency varies in strength or detectability. Studies tracking the same individuals over consecutive years are increasingly reporting migratory timings to be a repeatable trait, suggesting that flexible individual responses...

Host identity matters – up to a point: the community context of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis transmission

David Daversa, Jaime Bosch, Andy Fenton, Andrea Manica & Trent Garner
The level of detail on host communities needed to understand multi-host parasite invasions is an unresolved issue in disease ecology. Coarse community metrics that ignore functional differences between hosts, like host species richness, can be good predictors of invasion outcomes. Yet, if host species vary in the extent to which they maintain and transmit infections, then explicitly accounting for those differences may be important. Through controlled mesocosm experiments and modelling, we show that interspecific differences...

Synthesis of batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in South America: amphibian species under risk and areas to focus research and disease mitigation

Claudio Azat, Mario Alvarado-Rybak, Jaiber Solano-Iguaran, Anibal Velasco, Andrés Valenzuela-Sánchez, Sandra Flechas, Alexandra Peñafiel-Ricaurte, Andrew Cunningham & Leonardo Bacigalupe
Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been recognized as the infectious disease causing the most catastrophic loss of biodiversity known to science, with South America being the most impacted region. We tested whether Bd prevalence is distributed among host taxonomy, ecoregion, conservation status and habitat preference in South America. Here we provide a synthesis on the extent of Bd infection across South America based on 21,648 molecular diagnostic assays, roles of certain species...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • Zoological Society of London
    9
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of Liverpool
    2
  • Victoria University of Wellington
    1
  • University of Oviedo
    1
  • Parker Conservation
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission
    1
  • Jambi University
    1
  • Duke University
    1