16 Works

Data from: Marine environmental DNA biomonitoring reveals seasonal patterns in biodiversity and identifies ecosystem responses to anomalous climatic events

Tina E. Berry, Benjamin J. Saunders, Megan L. Coghlan, Michael Stat, Simon Jarman, Anthony J. Richardson, Claire H. Davies, Oliver Berry, Euan S. Harvey & Michael Bunce
Marine ecosystems are changing rapidly as the oceans warm and become more acidic. The physical factors and the changes to ocean chemistry that they drive can all be measured with great precision. Changes in the biological composition of communities in different ocean regions are far more challenging to measure because most biological monitoring methods focus on a limited taxonomic or size range. Environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis has the potential to solve this problem in biological...

Data from: Phylogenomics reveals the evolutionary timing and pattern of butterflies and moths

Akito Y. Kawahara, David Plotkin, Marianne Espeland, Karen Meusemann, Emmanuel F. A. Toussaint, Alexander Donath, France Gimnich, Paul B. Frandsen, Andreas Zwick, Mario Dos Reis, Jesse R. Barber, Ralph S. Peters, Shanlin Liu, Xin Zhou, Christoph Mayer, Lars Podsiadlowski, Caroline Storer, Jayne E. Yack, Bernhard Misof & Jesse W. Breinholt
Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are one of the major super-radiations of insects, comprising nearly 160,000 described extant species. As herbivores, pollinators, and prey, Lepidoptera play a fundamental role in almost every terrestrial ecosystem. Lepidoptera are also indicators of environmental change and serve as model organisms for research on mimicry and genetics. They have been central to the development of co-evolutionary hypotheses, such as butterflies with flowering plants, and moths' evolutionary arms race with echolocating bats....

Data from: Accounting for kin sampling reveals genetic connectivity in Tasmanian and New Zealand school sharks, Galeorhinus galeus

Floriaan Devloo-Delva, Gregory E. Maes, Sebastián I. Hernández, Jaime D. Mcallister, Rasanthi M. Gunasekera, Peter M. Grewe, Robin B. Thomson & Pierre Feutry
Fishing represents a major problem for conservation of chondrichthyans, with a quarter of all species being overexploited. School sharks, Galeorhinus galeus, are targeted by commercial fisheries in Australia and New Zealand. The Australian stock has been depleted to below 20% of its virgin biomass, and the species is recorded as Conservation Dependent within Australia. Individuals are known to move between both countries, but it is disputed whether the stocks are reproductively linked. Accurate and unbiased...

Data from: Contrasting processes drive ophiuroid phylodiversity across shallow and deep seafloors

Timothy J. O'Hara, Andrew F. Hugall, Skipton N.C. Woolley, Guadalupe Bribiesca-Contreras & Nocholas J. Bax
Our knowledge of the distribution and evolution of deep-sea life is limited, impeding our ability to identify priority areas for conservation. Here we analyse, for the first time, large integrated phylogenomic and distributional datasets of seafloor fauna from sea surface to abyss and equator to pole of the Southern Hemisphere for an entire class of invertebrates (Ophiuroidea). We find that latitudinal diversity gradients are assembled through contrasting evolutionary processes for shallow (0-200 m) and deep...

Data from: A comprehensive large-scale assessment of fisheries bycatch risk to threatened seabird populations

Thomas A. Clay, Cleo Small, Geoffrey N. Tuck, Deborah Pardo, Ana P.B. Carneiro, Andrew G. Wood, John P. Croxall, Glenn T. Crossin & Richard A. Phillips
1. Incidental mortality (bycatch) in fisheries remains the greatest threat to many large marine vertebrates and is a major barrier to fisheries sustainability. Robust assessments of bycatch risk are crucial for informing effective mitigation strategies, but are hampered by missing information on the distributions of key life-history stages (adult breeders and non-breeders, immatures and juveniles). 2. Using a uniquely comprehensive biologging dataset (1697 tracks, 790 individuals), we assessed spatial overlap of four threatened seabird populations...

Modelled arable area for Great Britain under different climate and policy scenarios

G.S. Smith & P.D.L. Ritchie
The dataset contains model output from an agricultural land use model at kilometre scale resolution over Great Britain (GB) for four different climate and policy scenarios. Specifically, arable area is modelled for with or without a climate tipping point (standard (medium emissions scenario SRES-A1B) climate change vs Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) collapse) and with or without widespread irrigation use for farmers from 2000 to 2089.

The percentage of total agricultural area under maize, rice, wheat, vegetables, pulses and fruit production, by country, subject to water scarcity in 2050 as estimated from a multi-model ensemble

N. Fitton, P. Alexander, N. Arnell, B. Bajzelj, K. Calvin, J. Doelman, J.S. Gerber, P. Havlik, T. Hasegawa, M. Herrero, T. Krisztin, H. Van Meijl, T. Powell, R. Sands, E. Stehfest, P.C. West & P. Smith
Projections of global changes in water scarcity with the current extent of maize, rice, wheat, vegetables, pulses and fruit production commodities were combined to identify the potential country level vulnerabilities of cropland land to water scarcity in 2050. The data relate to an analysis of the impact changes in water availability will have on maize, rice, wheat, vegetables, pulses and fruit production commodities availability in 2050.

Data from: Earth history and the passerine superradiation

Carl H. Oliveros, Daniel J. Field, Daniel T. Ksepka, F. Keith Barker, Alexandre Aleixo, Michael J. Andersen, Per Alström, Brett W. Benz, Edward L. Braun, Michael J. Braun, Gustavo A. Bravo, Robb T. Brumfield, R. Terry Chesser, Santiago Claramunt, Joel Cracraft, Andrés M. Cuervo, Elizabeth P. Derryberry, Travis C. Glenn, Michael G. Harvey, Peter A. Hosner, Leo Joseph, Rebecca T. Kimball, Andrew L. Mack, Colin M. Miskelly, A. Townsend Peterson … & Brant C. Faircloth
Avian diversification has been influenced by global climate change, plate tectonic movements, and mass extinction events. However, the impact of these factors on the diversification of the hyperdiverse perching birds (passerines) is unclear because family level relationships are unresolved and the timing of splitting events among lineages is uncertain. We analyzed DNA data from 4,060 nuclear loci and 137 passerine families using concatenation and coalescent approaches to infer a comprehensive phylogenetic hypothesis that clarifies relationships...

Data from: Pollen analogues are transported across greater distances in bee-pollinated than in hummingbird-pollinated species of Justicia (Acanthaceae)

Alexander N. Schmidt-Lebuhn, Matthias Muller, Paola Pozo, Francisco Encinas-Viso & Michael Kessler
Several hummingbird-pollinated plant lineages have been demonstrated to show increased rates of diversification compared to related insect-pollinated lineages. It has been argued that this pattern is produced by a higher degree of specialization on part of both hummingbirds and plants. We here test an alternative hypothesis: The often highly territorial hummingbirds may on average carry pollen over shorter distances than other pollinators and drive diversification by reducing gene flow distances. We present experimental data from...

Data from: Genetic diversity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) throughout West Africa

Curtis Lind, Seth Agyakwah, Felix Attipoe, Christopher Nugent, Richard Crooijmans & Aboubacar Toguyeni
Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is a globally significant aquaculture species rapidly gaining status as a farmed commodity. In West Africa, wild Nile tilapia genetic resources are abundant yet knowledge of fine-scale population structure and patterns of natural genetic variation are limited. Coinciding with this is a burgeoning growth in tilapia aquaculture in Ghana and other countries within the region underpinned by locally available genetic resources. Using 192 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers this study conducted...

Data from: The interplay of landscape composition and configuration: new pathways to manage functional biodiversity and agro-ecosystem services across Europe

Emily A. Martin, Matteo Dainese, Yann Clough, András Báldi, Riccardo Bommarco, Vesna Gagic, Michael Garratt, Andrea Holzschuh, David Kleijn, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Lorenzo Marini, Simon G. Potts, Henrik G. Smith, Diab Al Hassan, Matthias Albrecht, Georg K. S. Andersson, Josep Asis, Stephanie Aviron, Mario Balzan, Laura Baños-Picón, Ignasi Bartomeus, Peter Batary, Françoise Burel, Berta Caballero-López, Elena D. Concepcion … & Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Managing agricultural landscapes to support biodiversity and ecosystem services is a key aim of a sustainable agriculture. However, how the spatial arrangement of crop fields and other habitats in landscapes impacts arthropods and their functions is poorly known. Synthesising data from 49 studies (1515 landscapes) across Europe, we examined effects of landscape composition (% habitats) and configuration (edge density) on arthropods in fields and their margins, pest control, pollination and yields. Configuration effects interacted with...

Data from: Avian mitochondrial genomes retrieved from museum eggshell

Alicia Grealy, Michael Bunce & Clare Holleley
Avian eggshell is a bio-ceramic material with exceptional properties for preserving DNA within its crystalline structure, presenting an opportunity to retrieve genomic information from extinct or historic populations of birds. However, intracrystalline DNA has only been recovered from the large, thick eggshell of palaeognaths; members of their more-diverse sister group (neognaths) lay smaller, thinner eggs that may not exhibit the same propensity for DNA preservation. Here, we use three 40-60 year-old museum eggshell specimens of...

Data from: Changing landscapes of Southeast Asia and rodent-borne diseases: decreased diversity but increased transmission risks

Serge Morand, Kim Blasdell, Frédéric Bordes, Philippe Buchy, Bernard Carcy, Kittipong Chaisiri, Yannick Chaval, Julien Claude, Jean-François Cosson, Marc Desquesnes, Sathaporn Jittapalapong, Tawisa Jiyipong, Anamika Karnchanabanthoen, Pumhom Pornpan, Jean-Marc Rolain & Annelise Tran
The reduction in biodiversity through land use changes due to urbanization and agricultural intensification, appears linked to major epidemiological changes in many human diseases. Increasing disease risks and the emergence of novel pathogens appear to result from increased contact between wildlife, domesticated animals and humans. We investigate how increasing human domination of the environment may favor generalist and synanthropic rodent species and affect the diversity and prevalence of rodent-borne pathogens in Southeast Asia, a hotspot...

Data from: Biocontrol in insecticide sprayed crops does not benefit from semi-natural habitats and recovers slowly after spraying

Vesna Gagic, Andrew D. Hulthen, Anna Marcora, Xiaobei Wang, Laura Jones & Nancy A. Schellhorn
1. To enhance biological pest control in crop fields, it is recommended to increase semi-natural area on farm and decrease insecticide spraying. While the benefits of semi-natural area for biocontrol in unsprayed fields are often demonstrated, it remains largely unknown if there are any benefits in real world, commonly sprayed crops. 2. Here, we explored the combined effects of semi-natural field margins and insecticide spraying on pest (cotton bollworm) egg predation in 53 Australian cotton...

Data from: Sensitivity of global soil carbon stocks to combined nutrient enrichment

Thomas W. Crowther, Charlotte Riggs, Eric M. Lind, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Sarah E. Hobbie, E. R. Jasper Wubs, Peter B. Adler, Jennifer Firn, Laureano Gherardi, Nicole Hagenah, Kirsten S. Hofmockel, Johannes M. H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Pablo L. Peri, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens & Devin Routh
Soil stores approximately twice as much carbon as the atmosphere and fluctuations in the size of the soil carbon pool directly influence climate conditions. We used the Nutrient Network global change experiment to examine how anthropogenic nutrient enrichment might influence grassland soil carbon storage at a global scale. In isolation, enrichment of nitrogen and phosphorous had minimal impacts on soil carbon storage. However, when these nutrients were added in combination with potassium and micronutrients, soil...

Data from: The inverted U-shaped effect of urban hotspots spatial compactness on urban economic growth

Weipan Xu, Haohui Chen, Enrique Frias-Martinez, Manuel Cebrian & Xun Li
The compact city, as a sustainable concept, is intended to augment the efficiency of urban function. However, previous studies have concentrated more on morphology than on structure. The present study focuses on urban structural elements, i.e., urban hotspots consisting of high-density and high-intensity socioeconomic zones, and explores the economic performance associated with their spatial structure. We use nighttime luminosity (NTL) data and the Loubar method to identify and extract the hotspot and ultimately draw two...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    16

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    16

Affiliations

  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    15
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Curtin University
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of Padua
    1
  • University of Bath
    1
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    1