24 Works

Modelled mid-trophic pelagic prey fields improve understanding of marine predator foraging behaviour

David Green, Sophie Bestley, Rowan Trebilco, Stuart Corney, Patrick Lehodey, Clive McMahon, C. Guinet & Mark A. Hindell
Biophysical interactions are influential in determining the scale of key ecological processes within marine ecosystems. For oceanic predators, this means foraging behaviour is influenced by processes shaping the distribution of prey. However, oceanic prey is difficult to observe and its abundance and distribution is regionally generalised. We use a spatiotemporally resolved simulation model to describe mid-trophic prey distribution within the Southern Ocean and demonstrate insights that this modelled prey field provides into the foraging behaviour...

Does rapid utilisation of elevated nutrient availability allow eucalypts to dominate in the tropical savannas of Australia?

Harinandanan Paramjyothi, Brett Murphy, Michael Lawes, Natalie Rossitet-Rachor & Anna Richards
Northern Australia's savannas are amongst the most fire-prone biomes on Earth, and are dominated by eucalypts (Eucalyptus and Corymbia spp.). It is not clear what processes allows this group to dominate under such extreme fire frequencies and if a superior ability to compete for nutrients and water might play a role. There is evidence that eucalypts are adapted to frequent fires; juvenile eucalypts escape the fire trap by growing rapidly in height between fires. However,...

Supporting data for the paper 'Small-scale capillary heterogeneity linked to rapid plume migration during CO2 storage' by S.J. Jackson and S. Krevor 2020

Samuel Jackson & Samuel Krevor
Herein lies the supporting data for the paper 'Small-scale capillary heterogeneity linked to rapid plume migration during CO2 storage'. We supply experimental, analytical and numerical simulation data used in the paper. The supplied zipped folders follow the same order as the main paper, with codes to reproduce each figure (and those in the supporting information PDF). There are also video files (in the 5_Field_scale_simulation zipped folder) showing the final CO2 plume evolution from the static...

Climate change, sex reversal, and lability of sex determining systems

Lisa Schwanz, Arthur Georges, Clare Holleley & Stephen Sarre
Sex reversal at high temperatures during embryonic development (e.g. ZZ females) provides the opportunity for new genotypic crosses (e.g. ZZ male x ZZ female). This raises the alarming possibility that climatic warming could lead to the loss of an entire chromosome – one member of the sex chromosome pair (the Y or W) – and the transition of populations to environmental sex determination (ESD). Here we examine the evolutionary dynamics of sex-determining systems exposed to...

Data from: The loss of self-incompatibility in a range expansion

Francisco Encinas-Viso, Andrew Young & John Pannell
It is commonly observed that plant species’ range margins are enriched for increased selfing rates and, in otherwise self-incompatible species, for self-compatibility (SC). This has often been attributed to a response to selection under mate and/or pollinator limitation. However, range expansion can also cause reduced inbreeding depression, and this could facilitate the evolution of selfing in the absence of mate or pollinator limitation. Here, we explore this idea using spatially explicit individual-based simulations of a...

Amino acids (AA) all genes for: Beyond Drosophila: resolving the rapid radiation of schizophoran flies with phylotranscriptomics

Keith Bayless, Michelle Trautwein, Karen Meusemann, David Yeates & Brian Wiegmann
Background: The largest radiation of animal life since the end Cretaceous extinction event 66 million years ago is that of schizophoran flies: a third of fly diversity including Drosophila lab fruit flies, house flies, and many other well and poorly known true flies. Rapid diversification has hindered previous attempts to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships among major schizophoran clades. A robust phylogenetic hypothesis for the major lineages containing these 55,000 described species would be critical to...

Climate more important than soils for predicting forest biomass at the continental scale

Alison Bennett, Trent Penman, Stefan Arndt, Stephen Roxburgh & Lauren Bennett
Above-ground biomass in forests is critical to the global carbon cycle as it stores and sequesters carbon from the atmosphere. Climate change will disrupt the carbon cycle hence understanding how climate and other abiotic variables determine forest biomass at broad spatial scales is important for validating and constraining Earth System models and predicting the impacts of climate change on forest carbon stores. We examined the importance of climate and soil variables to explaining above-ground biomass...

Identification of Y chromosome markers in the eastern three-lined skink (Bassiana duperreyi) using in silico whole genome subtraction

Duminda Dissanayake, Clare Holleley & Arthur Georges
Background: Homologous sex chromosomes can differentiate over time because recombination is suppressed in the region of the sex determining locus, leading to the accumulation of repeats, progressive loss of genes that lack differential influence on the sexes and sequence divergence on the hemizygous homolog. Divergence in the non-recombining regions leads to the accumulation of Y or W specific sequence useful for developing sex-linked markers. Here we use in silico whole-genome subtraction to identify putative sex-linked...

Evolving thermal thresholds explain the distribution of temperature sex reversal in an Australian dragon lizard

Meghan Castelli, Arthur Georges, Caitlin Cherryh, Dan Rosauer, Stephen Sarre, Isabella Contador-Kelsall & Clare Holleley
Aim: Species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) are particularly vulnerable to climate change because a resultant skew in population sex ratio can have severe demographic consequences and increase vulnerability to local extinction. The Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) has a thermosensitive ZZ male/ZW female system of genetic sex determination (GSD). High incubation temperatures cause reversal of the ZZ genotype to a viable female phenotype. Nest temperatures in the wild are predicted to vary on...

Data from: Parallel evolution of bower-building behavior in two groups of bowerbirds suggested by phylogenomics

Per G. P. Ericson, Martin Irestedt, Johan A. A. Nylander, Les Christidis, Leo Joseph & Yanhua Qu
The bowerbirds in New Guinea and Australia include species that build the largest and perhaps most elaborately decorated constructions outside of humans. The males use these courtship bowers, along with their displays, to attract females. In these species, the mating system is polygynous and the females alone incubate and feed the nestlings. The bowerbirds also include 10 species of the socially monogamous catbirds in which the male participates in most aspects of raising the young....

Analysis of RNA-seq, DNA target enrichment, and Sanger nucleotide sequence data resolves deep splits in the phylogeny of cuckoo wasps (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae)

Thomas Pauli, Karen Meusemann, Sandra Kukowka, Manuela Sann, Alexander Donath, Christoph Mayer, Jan Philip Oeyen, Yolanda Ballesteros, Alexander Berg, Eric Van Den Berghe, Hermes Escalona, Adalgisa Guglielmino, Manfred Niehuis, Massimo Olmi, Lars Podsiadlowski, Carlo Polidori, Jeroen De Rond, Paolo Rosa, Thomas Schmitt, Franco Strumia, Mareike Wurdack, Shanlin Liu, Xin Zhou, Bernhard Misof, Ralph Peters … & Oliver Niehuis
The wasp family Chrysididae (cuckoo wasps, gold wasps) comprises exclusively parasitoid and kleptoparasitic species, many of which feature a stunning iridescent coloration and phenotypic adaptations to their parasitic life style. Previous attempts to infer phylogenetic relationships among the family’s major lineages (subfamilies, tribes, genera) based on Sanger sequence data were insufficient to statistically resolve the monophyly and the phylogenetic position of the subfamily Amiseginae and the phylogenetic relationships among the tribes Allocoeliini, Chrysidini, Elampini, and...

Data from: Oxidative stress delays development and alters gene expression in the agricultural pest moth, Helicoverpa armigera

, Bill James, Karl Gordon, Tom Walsh & Angela McGaughran
Stress is a widespread phenomenon that all organisms must endure. Common in nature is oxidative stress, which can interrupt cell homeostasis to cause cell damage and may be derived from respiration or from environmental exposure through diet. As a result of the routine exposure from respiration, many organisms can mitigate the effects of oxidative stress, but less is known about responses to oxidative stress from other sources. Helicoverpa armigera is a major agricultural pest moth...

Maintenance of variation in virulence and reproduction in populations of an agricultural plant pathogen

Anik Dutta, Daniel Croll, Bruce A. McDonald & Luke G. Barrett
Genetic diversity within pathogen populations is critically important for predicting pathogen evolution, disease outcomes, and prevalence. However, we lack a good understanding of the processes maintaining genetic variation and constraints on pathogen life‐history evolution. Here, we analyzed interactions between 12 wheat host genotypes and 145 strains of Zymoseptoria tritici from five global populations to investigate the evolution and maintenance of variation in pathogen virulence and reproduction. We found a strong positive correlation between virulence (amount...

Natural enemy-herbivore networks along local management and landscape gradients in urban agroecosystems

Stacy Philpott, Azucena Lucatero, Peter Bichier, Monika Egerer, Shalene Jha, Brenda Lin & Heidi Liere
Ecological networks can provide insight into how biodiversity loss and changes in species interactions impact the delivery of ecosystem services. In agroecosystems that vary in management practices, quantifying changes in ecological network structure across gradients of local and landscape composition can inform both the ecology and function of productive agroecosystems. In this study, we examined natural enemy-herbivore co-occurrence networks associated with Brassica oleracea (cole crops), a common crop in urban agricultural systems. Specifically, we investigated...

Around the world in 10 million years: rapid dispersal of a kleptoparasitoid spider wasp (Pompilidae: Ceropales)

Juanita Rodriguez, Sarah Bank, Cecilia Waichert, Carol Von Dohlen & James Pitts
Aim: Our aim was to estimate the historical biogeography of the kleptoparasitoid genus Ceropales and to determine the processes leading to its current worldwide distribution. We tested hypotheses of dispersal and vicariance scenarios underlying its widespread distribution. Location: Worldwide. Methods: Data from two nuclear markers (the D2–D3 regions of the 28S ribosomal RNA and long-wavelength rhodopsin) and one mitochondrial marker (cytochrome c oxidase I) for 52 specimens of Ceropales were used to reconstruct a dated...

Seagrass mapping synthesis: A resource for coastal management in the Great Barrier Reef

Alex Carter, Catherine Collier, Skye McKenna, Michael Rasheed, Roland Pitcher, Len McKenzie & Rob Cole

Coral restoration – a systematic review of current methods, successes, failures and future directions

Lisa Boström-Einarsson, Russell C. Babcock, Elisa Bayraktarov, Daniela Ceccarelli, Nathan Cook, Sebastian C. A. Ferse, Boze Hancock, Peter Harrison, Margaux Hein, Elizabeth Shaver, Adam Smith, David Suggett, Phoebe J. Stewart-Sinclair, Tali Vardi & Ian M. McLeod
Coral reef ecosystems have suffered an unprecedented loss of habitat-forming hard corals in recent decades. While marine conservation has historically focused on passive habitat protection, demand for and interest in active restoration has been growing in recent decades. However, a disconnect between coral restoration practitioners, coral reef managers and scientists has resulted in a disjointed field where it is difficult to gain an overview of existing knowledge. To address this, we aimed to synthesise the...

Oligocene divergence of frogmouth birds (Podargidae) across Wallace’s line

Paul Oliver, Holly Heiniger, Andrew Hugall, Leo Joseph & Kieren Mitchell
Wallace’s Line demarcates the transition between the differentiated regional faunas of Asia and Australia. However, while patterns of biotic differentiation across these two continental landmasses and the intervening island groups (“Wallacea”) have been extensively studied, patterns of long-term dispersal and diversification across this region are less well understood. Frogmouths (Aves: Podargidae) are a relictual family of large nocturnal birds represented by three extant genera occurring respectively in Asia, “Sahul” (Australia and New Guinea), and the...

Data from: Capturing open ocean biodiversity: comparing environmental DNA metabarcoding to the continuous plankton recorder

Leonie Suter, Andrea Polanowski, Laurence Clarke, John Kitchener & Bruce Deagle
Environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding is emerging as a novel, objective tool for monitoring marine metazoan biodiversity. Zooplankton biodiversity in the vast and important open ocean is currently monitored through continuous plankton recorder (CPR) surveys, using ship-based bulk plankton sampling and morphological identification. We assessed whether eDNA metabarcoding (2 L filtered seawater) could capture similar Southern Ocean biodiversity as conventional CPR bulk sampling (~1500 L filtered seawater per CPR sample). We directly compared eDNA metabarcoding with...

Data from: One panel to rule them all: DArTcap genotyping for population structure, historical demography, and kinship analyses, and its application to a threatened shark

Pierre Feutry, Floriaan Devloo-Delva, Adrien Tran Lu Y, Stefano Mona, Rasanthi Gunasekera, Grant Johnson, Richard Pillans, Damian Jaccoud, Andrzej Kilian, David Morgan, Thor Saunders, Nicholas Bax & Peter Kyne
With recent advances in sequencing technology, genomic data are changing how important conservation management decisions are made. Applications such as Close-Kin Mark-Recapture demand large amounts of data to estimate population size and structure, and their full potential can only be realised through ongoing improvements in genotyping strategies. Here we introduce DArTcap, a cost-efficient method that combines DArTseq and sequence capture, and illustrate its use in a high resolution population analysis of Glyphis garricki, a rare,...

Data from: Resilience of an integrated crop-livestock system to climate change: a simulation analysis of cover crop grazing in southern Brazil

Caitlin Peterson, Lindsay Bell, Paulo Carvalho & Amelie Gaudin
Integrated crop-livestock systems are a form of sustainable intensification of agriculture that rely on synergistic relationships between plant and animal components to bolster critical agroecosystem processes. We simulated cash crop and cover crop productivity dynamics in an integrated beef-soybean cover crop grazing system typical of southern Brazil to gain a better understanding of the impacts of livestock integration on system performance. Long-term historical simulations in APSIM showed that the integrated system resulted in greater system-wide...

High elevation increases the risk of Y chromosome loss in Alpine skink populations with sex reversal

Arthur Georges, Duminda Dissanayake, Clare Holleley & Janine Deakin
The view genotypic sex determination (GSD) and environmental sex determination (ESD) are mutually exclusive states has been contradicted by the discovery that chromosomal sex and environmental influences can co-exist within the same species, hinting at a continuum of intermediate states. Systems where genes and the environment interact to determine sex present the opportunity for sex reversal to occur, where the phenotypic sex is the opposite of that predicted by their sex chromosome complement. The skink...

Self-compatible blueberry cultivars require fewer floral visits to maximise fruit production than a partially self-incompatible cultivar

Liam K. Kendall, Vesna Gagic, Lisa Evans, Brian Cutting, Jessica Scalzo, Yolanda Hanusch, Jeremy Jones, Maurizio Rocchetti, Carolyn Sonter, Matthew Keir & Romina Rader
Effective pollination is a complex phenomenon determined by the outcome of the interaction between pollen transfer and a plants’ pollinator dependency, yet most studies investigate pollinator effectiveness without consideration of plant mating system differences. We investigated pollinator effectiveness in three types of blueberry that differed in their degree of pollinator dependency as measured by plant mating system: two self-compatible highbush cultivars and one partially self-incompatible rabbiteye cultivar. We quantified pollinator effectiveness as a function of...

Genetic barcoding of museum eggshell improves data integrity of avian biological collections

Alicia Grealy, Naomi Langmore, Leo Joseph & Clare Holleley
Natural history collections are often plagued by missing or inaccurate metadata for collection items, particularly for specimens that are difficult to verify or rare. Avian eggshell in particular can be challenging to identify due to extensive morphological ambiguity among taxa. Species identifications can be improved using DNA extracted from museum eggshell; however, the suitability of current methods for use on small museum eggshell specimens has not been rigorously tested, hindering uptake. In this study, we...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    24
  • Australian National University
    3
  • University of Canberra
    3
  • Southern Cross University
    2
  • Charles Darwin University
    2
  • James Cook University
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    2
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • University of Würzburg
    1
  • The Nature Conservancy
    1