4 Works

Data from: Using genetic relatedness to understand heterogeneous distributions of urban rat-associated pathogens

Kaylee Byers, Tom Booker, Matthew Combs, Chelsea Himsworth, Jason Munshi-South, David Patrick & Michael Whitlock
Urban Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) carry several pathogens transmissible to people. However, pathogen prevalence can vary across fine spatial scales (i.e., by city block). Using a population genomics approach, we sought to describe rat movement patterns across an urban landscape, and to evaluate whether these patterns align with pathogen distributions. We genotyped 605 rats from a single neighborhood in Vancouver, Canada and used 1,495 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms to identify parent-offspring and sibling relationships using...

Genetic Adaptation in New York City Rats

Arbel Harpak, Nandita Garud, Noah Rosenberg, Dmitri Petrov, Pleuni Pennings & Jason Munshi-South
Brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) thrive in urban environments by navigating the anthropocentric environment and taking advantage of human resources and by-products. From the human perspective, rats are a chronic problem that causes billions of dollars in damage to agriculture, health and infrastructure. Did genetic adaptation play a role in the spread of rats in cities? To approach this question, we collected whole-genome sequences from 29 brown rats from New York City (NYC) and scanned for...

Variation in brown rat cranial shape shows directional selection over 120 years in New York City

Emily Puckett, Emma Sherratt, Matthew Combs, Elizabeth Carlen, William Harcourt-Smith & Jason Munshi-South
Urbanization exposes species to novel environments and selection pressures that may change morphological traits within a population. We investigated how the shape and size of crania and mandibles changed over time within a population of brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) living in Manhattan, New York, USA, a highly urbanized environment. We measured 3D landmarks on the cranium and mandible of 62 adult individuals sampled in the 1890s and 2010s. Static allometry explained approximately 22% of shape...

Data from: Phylogenomics reveals novel relationships among Neotropical crocodiles (Crocodylus spp.)

Yoamel Milian-Garcia, George Amato, John Gatesy, Evon Hekkala, Natalia Rossi & Michael Russello
Extant species in the order Crocodylia are remnants of an ancient lineage of large-bodied archosaur reptiles. Despite decades of systematic studies, phylogenetic relationships among members of the genus Crocodylus (true crocodiles) in the Neotropics are poorly understood. Here we estimated phylogenomic relationships among the four extant Crocodylus species in the Americas. Species-tree reconstructions using genotypic data from 17,538 SNPs collected for 33 individuals spanning six Crocodylus species (four ingroup and two outgroup) revealed novel relationships...

Registration Year

  • 2020
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Fordham University
    4
  • Columbia University
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • American Museum of Natural History
    2
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Memphis
    1
  • University of Guelph
    1
  • University of California Los Angeles
    1
  • Wildlife Conservation Society
    1