10 Works

Context dependent fitness costs of reproduction despite stable body mass costs in an Arctic herbivore

Gabriel Pigeon, Steve Albon, Leif Egil Loe, Richard Bischof, Christophe Bonenfant, Mads Farchhammer, Justine Irvine, Erik Ropstad, Vebjorn Veiberg & Audun Stein
1. The cost of reproduction on demographic rates is often assumed to operate through changing body condition. Several studies have found that reproduction depresses body mass more if the current conditions are severe, such as high population densities or adverse weather, than under benign environmental conditions. However, few studies have investigated the association between the fitness and body mass costs of reproduction. 2. Using 25 years of individual-based capture-recapture data from Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus...

Potential benefits of incorporating arable wildflowers into living mulches for sustainable agriculture

Jennifer Rowntree, Clare Dean, Freddie Morrison, Rob Brooker & Elizabeth Price
Background: As agriculture has intensified, many once-common wildflowers have declined in arable landscapes, which has widespread implications for associated ecosystem services. The incorporation of sustainable practices, for example, growing living mulches (in-field, non-crop plant ground cover, maintained during the target crop growing season), can boost arable biodiversity, but few wildflower species have been utilised in this context. Aims: Our aim was to determine the suitability of arable wildflower species, once considered weeds, for use as...

Tripartite symbioses regulate plant-soil feedback in alder

Agnes Ardanuy, Jennifer KM Walker, Ully Kritzler, Andy FS Taylor & David Johnson
• Plant-soil feedbacks regulate plant productivity and diversity, but potential mechanisms underpinning such feedbacks, such as the allocation of recent plant assimilate, remain largely untested especially for plants forming tripartite symbioses. • We tested how soils from under alder (Alnus glutinosa) and beneath other species of the same and different families affected alder growth and nutrition, and colonisation of roots by nitrogen-fixing Frankia bacteria and ectomycorrhizal fungi. We also measured how the soil environment affected...

Drought has negative consequences on aphid fitness and plant vigour: insights from a meta-analysis

Daniel J Leybourne, Katharine F Preedy, Tracy A Valentine, Jorunn I B Bos & Alison J Karley
1. Aphids are abundant in natural and managed vegetation, supporting a diverse community of organisms and causing damage to agricultural crops. Due to a changing climate, periods of drought are anticipated to increase, and the potential consequences of this for aphid-plant interactions are unclear. 2. Using a meta-analysis and synthesis approach, we aimed to advance understanding of how increased drought incidence will affect this ecologically and economically important insect group, and to characterise any potential...

Determinants of heart rate in Svalbard reindeer reveal mechanisms of seasonal energy management

L. Monica Trondrud, Gabriel Pigeon, Steve Albon, Walter Arnold, Alina L. Evans, R. Justin Irvine, Elżbieta Król, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Vebjørn Veiberg, John R. Speakman & Leif Egil Loe
Seasonal energetic challenges may constrain an animal’s ability to respond to changing individual and environmental conditions. Here we investigated variation in heart rate, a well-established proxy for metabolic rate, in Svalbard reindeer, a species with strong seasonal changes in foraging and metabolic activity. In 19 adult females we recorded heart rate, subcutaneous temperature and activity using biologgers. Mean heart rate more than doubled from winter to summer. Typical drivers of energy expenditure, such as reproduction...

Fat storage influences fasting endurance more than body size in an ungulate

L. Monica Trondrud, Gabriel Pigeon, Elżbieta Król, Steve Albon, Alina L. Evans, Walter Arnold, Catherine Hambly, R. Justin Irvine, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Vebjørn Veiberg, John R. Speakman & Leif Egil Loe
1. The fasting endurance hypothesis (FEH) predicts strong selection for large body size in mammals living in environments where food supply is interrupted over prolonged periods of time. The Arctic is a highly seasonal and food restricted environment, but contrary to predictions from the FEH, empirical evidence shows that Arctic mammals are often smaller than their temperate conspecifics. Intraspecific studies integrating physiology and behaviour of different-sized individuals, may shed light on this paradox. 2. We...

Irreproducibility in searches of scientific literature: a comparative analysis

Gabor Pozsgai, Gabor Lövei, Liette Vasseur, Geoff Gurr, Péter Batáry, Janos Korponai, Nick Littlewood, Jian Liu, Arnold Móra, John Obrycki, Olivia Reynolds, Jenni Stockan, Heather VanVolkenburg, Jie Zhang, Wenwu Zhou & Minsheng You
1. Repeatability is the cornerstone of science and it is particularly important for systematic reviews. However, little is known on how researchers’ choice of database and search platform influence the repeatability of systematic reviews. Here, we aim to unveil how the computer environment and the location where the search was initiated from influence hit results. 2. We present a comparative analysis of time-synchronized searches at different institutional locations in the world, and evaluate the consistency...

Chromosome evolution and the genetic basis of agronomically important traits in greater yam

Jessen Bredeson, Jessica Lyons, Ibukun Oniyinde, Nneka Okereke, Olufisayo Kolade, Ikenna Nnabue, Nneka Okereke, Christian Nwadili, Eva Hribova, Matthew Parker, Jeremiah Nwogha, Shengqiang Shu, Joseph Carlson, Robert Kariba, Samuel Muthemba, Katarzyna Knop, Geoffrey Barton, Anna Sherwood, Antonio Lopez-Montes, Robert Asiedu, Ramni Jamnadass, Alice Muchugi, David Goodstein, Chiedozie Egesi, Jonathan Featherston … & Daniel Rokhsar
The nutrient-rich tubers of the greater yam, Dioscorea alata L., provide food and income security for millions of people around the world. Despite its global importance, however, greater yam remains an ‘orphan crop.’ Here we address this resource gap by presenting a highly contiguous chromosome-scale genome assembly of D. alata combined with a dense genetic map derived from African breeding populations. The genome sequence reveals an ancient allotetraploidization in the Dioscorea lineage, followed by extensive...

Long-term multisite Scots pine single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes and phenotypes for marker-trait association analysis

A. Perry, J. Beaton, G. Iason, J. Cottrell, J. Stockan & S. Cavers
This dataset contains data pertaining to the phenotypes (height and budburst) and genotypes (via SNP array) for a subset of trees from a long term multi-site Scots pine experimental trial.

Data from: Location, but not defensive genotype, determines ectomycorrhizal community composition in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings

Jim Downie, Andy F. S. Taylor, Glenn Iason, Ben Moore, Jonathan Silvertown, Stephen Cavers & Richard Ennos
1. For successful colonisation of host roots, ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi must overcome host defence systems, and defensive phenotypes have previously been shown to affect the community composition of EM fungi associated with hosts. Secondary metabolites, such as terpenes, form a core part of these defence systems, but it is not yet understood whether variation in these constitutive defences can result in variation in colonisation of hosts by specific fungal species. 2. We planted seedlings from...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    10

Affiliations

  • James Hutton Institute
    10
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    3
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    3
  • Frankfurt Zoological Society
    2
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    2
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2
  • Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences
    2
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    2
  • University of Dundee
    2