56 Works

Data from: Patterns of genomic divergence and signals of selection in sympatric and allopatric northeastern Pacific and Sea of Cortez populations of the sargo (Anisotremus davidsonii) and longjaw mudsucker (Gillichthys mirabilis)

Eric Garcia, Brian Simison & Giacomo Bernardi
Studying how isolation can impact population divergence and adaptation in co-distributed species can bring us closer to understanding how landscapes affect biodiversity. The Sargo, Anisotremus davidsonii (Haemulidae), and the Longjaw mudsucker, Gillichthys mirabilis (Gobiidae), offer a notable framework to study such mechanisms as their Pacific populations cross phylogeographic breaks at Point Conception, California, USA, and Punta Eugenia, Mexico, and are separated to those in the Sea of Cortez by the Baja California peninsula. Here, thousands...

Northern elephant seal UAS mass estimates

Roxanne Beltran
Unmanned aerial system (UAS) photogrammetry offers a method that is safer for both animals and researchers and is logistically simpler than traditional weighing methods (Fiori et al. 2017). Additionally, UAS photogrammetry facilitates larger sample sizes because it allows measurement at larger spatial scales, thereby increasing statistical power (Sweeney et al. 2015). However, UAS photogrammetry requires calibration and validation prior to use in order to assess the error relative to known mass measurements. Species-specific calibration of...

The promise and the perils of resurveying to understand global change impacts

Katharine Stuble, Sharon Bewick, Mark Fisher, Matthew Forister, Susan Harrison, Arthur Shapiro, Andrew Latimer & Laurel Fox
Historical datasets can be useful tools to aid in understanding the impacts of global change on natural ecosystems. Resampling of historically sampled sites (“snapshot resampling”) has often been used to detect long-term shifts in ecological populations and communities, because it allows researchers to avoid long-term monitoring costs and investigate a large number of potential trends. But recent simulation-based research has called the reliability of resampling into question, and its utility has not been comprehensively evaluated....

Patterns of speciation are similar across mountainous and lowland regions for a Neotropical plant radiation (Costaceae: Costus)

Oscar M. Vargas, Brittany Goldston, Dena Louise Grossenbacher & Kathleen M. Kay
High species richness and endemism in tropical mountains are recognized as major contributors to the latitudinal diversity gradient. The processes underlying mountain speciation, however, are largely untested. The prevalence of steep ecogeographic gradients and the geographic isolation of populations by topographic features are predicted to promote speciation in mountains. We evaluate these processes in a species-rich Neotropical genus of understory herbs that range from the lowlands to montane forests and have higher species richness in...

Results of high-performance computing parameter sweeps associated with the Zimbabwe agro-pastoral management model

M.V. Eitzel, Jon Solera, K.B. Wilson, Kleber Neves, Aaron Fisher, André Veski, Oluwasola Omoju, Abraham Mawere Ndlovu & Emmanuel Mhike Hove
This dataset includes all the results of the model runs used to explore the parameters in the Zimbabwe Agro-Pastoral Management Model, archived at ComSES.net (https://doi.org/10.25937/ta23-sn46). This model has been created with and for the researcher-farmers of the Muonde Trust (http://www.muonde.org/), a registered Zimbabwean non-governmental organization dedicated to fostering Indigenous innovation. The results in this dataset were generated using the BehaviorSpace functionality in NetLogo, running headless on a high-performance computing cluster (499,200 runs). The dataset includes...

Data from: Geographic structuring of Antarctic penguin populations

Jarrod Santora, Michelle LaRue & David Ainley
We hypothesized that regional spatial organization of Antarctic penguin breeding populations was affected by social factors, i.e., proximity and size of adjacent colonies, and by physical factors, i.e., availability of breeding habitat and proximity of polynyas and submarine canyons where prey is abundant. The hypothesis of Furness & Birkhead (1984), that forage competition and density-dependence affect geographic structure of seabird populations, was tested previously for Antarctic penguins when biologging to quantify colony foraging areas was...

An escape theory model for directionally moving prey and an experimental test in juvenile Chinook salmon

Megan Sabal, Joseph Merz, Suzanne Alonzo & Eric Palkovacs
Prey evaluate risk and make decisions based on the balance between the costs of predation and those of engaging in antipredator behavior. Economic escape theory has been valuable in understanding responses of stationary prey under predation risk; however, current models are not applicable for directionally moving prey. Here we present an extension of existing escape theory that predicts how much predation risk is perceived by directionally moving prey. Perceived risk is measured by the extent...

Mixed-species herding levels the landscape of fear

Keenan Stears, Melissa Schmitt, Christopher Wilmers & Adrian Shrader
Prey antipredator behaviours are influenced by perceived predation risk in a landscape and social information gleaned from herd mates regarding predation risk. It is well documented that high-quality social information about risk can come from heterospecific herd mates. Here, we integrate social information with the landscape of fear to quantify how these landscapes are modified by mixed-species herding. To do this, we investigated zebra vigilance in single- and mixed-species herds across different levels of predation...

Heat flux and temperature at depth beneath InSight landing site through time

Szilard Gyalay, Francis Nimmo, Ana-Catalina Plesa & Mark Wieczorek
The heat flux and thus temperature gradient of the Martian crust is critical for comparison with measurements of crustal properties. This allows for constraints upon the inferred thermal history of Mars. Each file contains the heat flux and temperature at several depths as a function of time after Mars formed, but assuming different crustal properties.

Data from: The socially parasitic ant Polyergus mexicanus has host-associated genetic population structure and related neighboring nests

Joseph Sapp, Jenn Yost & Bruce Lyon
The genetic structure of populations can be both a cause and a consequence of ecological interactions. For parasites, genetic structure may be a consequence of preferences for host species or of mating behavior. Conversely, genetic structure can determine where conspecific interactions among parasites lay on a spectrum from cooperation to conflict. We used microsatellite loci to characterize the genetic structure of a population of the socially parasitic dulotic (aka “slave-making”) ant (Polyergus mexicanus), which is...

Data from: Puma energetics: laboratory oxygen consumption and GPS information from free-ranging individuals

Terrie Williams, Nikki Marks, Christopher Wilmers, Caleb Bryce, Barry Nickel, Lisa Wolfe, David Scantlebury & Carolyn Dunford
Abstract Background Under current scenarios of climate change and habitat loss, many wild animals, especially large predators, are moving into novel energetically challenging environments. Consequently, changes in terrain associated with such moves may heighten energetic costs and effect the decline of populations in new localities. Methods To examine locomotor costs of a carnivorous mammal moving in mountainous habitats, the oxygen consumption of captive pumas (Puma concolor) was measured during treadmill locomotion on level and incline...

Recent warming reduces the reproductive advantage of large size and contributes to evolutionary downsizing in nature

David C Fryxell, Alexander N. Hoover, Daniel A. Alvarez, Finn J. Arnesen, Javiera N. Benavente, Emma R. Moffett, Michael T. Kinnison, Kevin S. Simon & Eric P. Palkovacs
Body size is a key functional trait that is predicted to decline under warming. Warming is known to cause size declines via phenotypic plasticity, but evolutionary responses of body size to warming are poorly understood. To test for warming-induced evolutionary responses of body size and growth rates, we used populations of mosquitofish ( Gambusia affinis ) recently established (less than 100 years) from a common source across a strong thermal gradient (19–33°C) created by geothermal...

Data from: Zooming in on mechanistic predator-prey ecology: integrating camera traps with experimental methods to reveal the drivers of ecological interactions

Justine Smith, Justin Suraci, Jennifer Hunter, Kaitlyn Gaynor, Carson Keller, Meredith Palmer, Justine Atkins, Irene Castañeda, Michael Cherry, Patrick Garvey, Sarah Huebner, Dana Morin, Lisa Teckentrup, Martijn Weterings & Lydia Beaudrot
1. Camera trap technology has galvanized the study of predator-prey ecology in wild animal communities by expanding the scale and diversity of predator-prey interactions that can be analyzed. While observational data from systematic camera arrays have informed inferences on the spatiotemporal outcomes of predator-prey interactions, the capacity for observational studies to identify mechanistic drivers of species interactions is limited. 2. Experimental study designs that utilize camera traps uniquely allow for testing hypothesized mechanisms that drive...

Versatile simulations of admixture and accurate local ancestry inference with mixnmatch and ancestryinfer

Molly Schumer, Daniel Powell & Russell Corbett-Detig
It is now clear that hybridization between species is much more common than previously recognized. As a result, we now know that the genomes of many modern species, including our own, are a patchwork of regions derived from past hybridization events. Increasingly researchers are interested in disentangling which regions of the genome originated from each parental species using local ancestry inference methods. Due to the diverse effects of admixture, this interest is shared across disparate...

Community-level reorganizations following migratory pollinator dynamics along a latitudinal gradient

Ainhoa Magrach, Carlos Lara, Márquez-Luna Ubaldo, Sergio Díaz-Infante & Ingrid M. Parker
Predicting how communities re-arrange in response to changes in species composition remains a key challenge in ecology. Migratory species, which enter and leave communities across latitudinal gradients, offer us a unique opportunity to evaluate community and species-level responses to a shift in community composition. We focused on a migratory hummingbird and the communities that host it along a latitudinal and species diversity gradient. Our results show higher niche overlap in more diverse communities, allowing resident...

Gardener demographics, experience, and motivations drive differences in plant species richness and composition in urban gardens

Stacy Philpott, Monika Egerer, Peter Bichier, Hamutahl Cohen, Roseann Cohen, Heidi Liere, Shalene Jha & Brenda Lin
Urban agriculture has received considerable attention for its role in supporting biodiversity and ecosystem services, and health and well-being for growing urban populations. Urban gardens managed with agroecological practices and higher plant diversity support more biodiversity and may support higher crop production. Plant selection in gardens is a function of temperature and environmental conditions and also depends on gardener socio-demographic characteristics, motivations for gardening, and gardening experience. In this study, we examined how plant richness...

Data from: Global hotspots for coastal ecosystem-based adaptation

Holly P. Jones, Barry A. Nickel, Tanja Srebotnjak, Will Turner, Mariano Gonzalez-Roglich, Erika Zavaleta & David G. Hole
Helping the world’s coastal communities adapt to climate change impacts requires evaluating the vulnerability of coastal communities and assessing adaptation options. This includes understanding the potential for ‘natural’ infrastructure (ecosystems and the biodiversity that underpins them) to reduce communities’ vulnerability, alongside more traditional ‘hard’ infrastructure approaches. Here we present a spatially explicit global evaluation of the vulnerability of coastal-dwelling human populations to key climate change exposures and explore the potential for coastal ecosystems to help...

CT DICOM studies from: In vivo measurements of lung volumes in ringed seals: insights from biomedical imaging

Holly Hermann-Sorensen, Nicole Thometz, Kathleen Woodie, Sophie Dennison-Gibby & Colleen Reichmuth
This dataset supports: Hermann-Sorensen, H., Thometz, N.M., Woodie, K., Dennison-Gibby, S., and Reichmuth, C. In vivo measurements of lung volumes in ringed seals: insights from biomedical imaging. Journal of Experimental Biology. Marine mammals rely on oxygen stored in blood, muscle, and lungs to support breath-hold diving and foraging at sea. Here, we used biomedical imaging to examine lung oxygen stores and other key respiratory parameters in living ringed seals (Pusa hispida). Three-dimensional models created from...

Single-chain heteropolymers transport protons selectively and rapidly

Tao Jiang, Aaron Hall, Marco Eres, Zahra Hemmatian, Baofu Qiao, Yun Zhou, Zhiyuan Ruan, Andrew D. Couse, William T. Heller, Haiyan Huang, Monica Olvera De La Cruz, Marco Rolandi & Ting Xu
Precise protein sequencing and folding are believed to generate the natural channel structure and chemical diversity of proteins, both of which are essential to synthetically achieve proton transport performance comparable to that seen in natural systems. Geometrically defined channels have been fabricated using peptides, DNAs, carbon nanotubes, sequence-defined polymers and organic frameworks; however, none of these channels rivals the performance observed in their natural counterparts. Here we show that without forming an atomically structured channel,...

Data From: Ecosystem size shapes antipredator trait evolution in estuarine threespine stickleback

Ben A. Wasserman, Antoine Paccard, Travis M. Apgar, Simone Des Roches, Rowan D.H. Barrett, Andrew P. Hendry & Eric P. Palkovacs
Ecosystem size is known to influence both community structure and ecosystem processes. Less is known about the evolutionary consequences of ecosystem size. A few studies have shown that ecosystem size shapes the evolution of trophic diversity by shaping habitat heterogeneity, but the effects of ecosystem size on antipredator trait evolution have not been explored. Ecosystem size may impact antipredator trait evolution by shaping predator presence (larger ecosystems have longer food chains) and habitat complexity (larger...

Data for: Environmentally-driven escalation of host egg-rejection decimates success of an avian brood parasite

John Eadie & Bruce Lyon
The black-headed duck (Heteronetta atricapilla) of South America is the only known avian obligate brood parasite with precocial offspring. In Argentina, it relies on two species of coots as primary hosts, which typically reject 35-65% of duck eggs. We show that environmentally-driven increases in host egg-rejection behavior lead to substantial reductions in the reproductive success of the brood parasite. Episodes of flooding and vegetation loss caused dramatic shifts in host egg rejection behavior, resulting in...

Data from: Integrative genomic analysis in African American children with asthma finds 3 novel loci associated with lung function

Pagé Goddard, Kevin Keys, Angel Mak, Eunice Lee, Amy Liu, Lesly-Anne Samedy-Bates, Oona Risse-Adams, Maria Contreras, Jennifer Elhawary, Donglei Hu, Sam Oh, Sandra Salazar, Celeste Eng, Blanca Himes, Marquitta White & Esteban Burchard
Bronchodilator drugs are commonly prescribed for treatment and management of obstructive lung function present with diseases such as asthma. Administration of bronchodilator medication can partially or fully restore lung function as measured by pulmonary function tests. The genetics of baseline lung function measures taken prior to bronchodilator medication has been extensively studied, and the genetics of the bronchodilator response itself has received some attention. However, few studies have focused on the genetics of post-bronchodilator lung...

Data from: Laboratory culture of the California Sea Firefly Vargula tsujii (Ostracoda: Cypridinidae): developing a model system for the evolution of marine bioluminescence

Jessica A. Goodheart, Geetanjali Minsky, Mira N. Brynjegard-Bialik, Michael S. Drummond, J. David Munoz, Timothy R. Fallon, Darrin T. Schultz, Jing-Ke Weng, Elizabeth Torres & Todd H. Oakley
Bioluminescence, or the production of light by living organisms via chemical reaction, is widespread across Metazoa. Laboratory culture of bioluminescent organisms from diverse taxonomic groups is important for determining the biosynthetic pathways of bioluminescent substrates, which may lead to new tools for biotechnology and biomedicine. Some bioluminescent groups may be cultured, including some cnidarians, ctenophores, and brittle stars, but those use luminescent substrates (luciferins) obtained from their diets, and therefore are not informative for determination...

Quantifying thermal exposure for migratory riverine species: phenology of Chinook salmon populations predicts thermal stress

Alyssa FitzGerald, Sara John, Travis Apgar, Nathan Mantua & Benjamin Martin
Migratory species are particularly vulnerable to climate change because habitat throughout their entire migration cycle must be suitable for the species to persist. For migratory species in rivers, predicting climate change impacts is especially difficult because there is a lack of spatially-continuous and seasonally-varying stream temperature data, habitat conditions can vary for an individual throughout its life cycle, and vulnerability can vary by life stage and season. To predict thermal impacts on migratory riverine populations,...

The case of an arctic wild ass highlights the utility of ancient DNA for validating problematic identifications in museum collections

Alisa Vershinina, Joshua D. Kapp, Gennady Baryshnikov & Beth Shapiro
Museum collections are essential for reconstructing and understanding past biodiversity. Many museum specimens are, however, challenging to identify. Museum samples may be incomplete, have an unusual morphology, or represent juvenile individuals, all of which complicate accurate identification. In some cases, inaccurate identification can lead to false biogeographic reconstructions with cascading impacts on paleontological and paleoecological research. Here we analyze an unusual Equid mandible found in the Far North of the Taymyr peninsula that was identified...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    56

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56

Affiliations

  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    56
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    4
  • Stanford University
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • California Polytechnic State University
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • California State University Los Angeles
    2
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    2
  • Seattle University
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2