22 Works

Data from: Estimating synchronous demographic changes across populations using hABC and its application for a herpetological community from northeastern Brazil

Marcelo Gehara, Adrian Antoinio Garda, Fernanda P. Werneck, Eliana F. Oliveira, Emanuel M. Da Fonseca, Felipe Camurugi, Felipe De M. Magalhães, Flavia Mol Lanna, Jack W. Sites, Ricardo Marques, Ricardo Silveira-Filho, Vinícius A. São-Pedro, Guarino R. Colli, Gabriel C. Costa & Frank T. Burbrink
Many studies propose that Quaternary climatic cycles contracted and /or expanded the ranges of species and biomes. Strong expansion-contraction dynamics of biomes presume concerted demographic changes of associated fauna. The analysis of temporal concordance of demographic changes can be used to test the influence of Quaternary climate on diversification processes. Hierarchical approximate Bayesian computation (hABC) is a powerful and flexible approach that models genetic data from multiple species, and can be used to estimate the...

Data from: Livestock abundance predicts vampire bat demography, immune profiles, and bacterial infection risk

Daniel J. Becker, Gábor Á. Czirják, Dmitriy V. Volokhov, Alexandra B. Bentz, Jorge E. Carrera, Melinda S. Camus, Kristen J. Navara, Vladimir E. Chizhikov, M. Brock Fenton, Nancy B. Simmons, Sergio E. Recuenco, Amy T. Gilbert, Sonia Altizer & Daniel G. Streicker
Human activities create novel food resources that can alter wildlife–pathogen interactions. If resources amplify or dampen pathogen transmission likely depends on both host ecology and pathogen biology, but studies that measure responses to provisioning across both scales are rare. We tested these relationships with a four-year study of 369 common vampire bats across ten sites in Peru and Belize that differ in the abundance of livestock, an important anthropogenic food source. We quantified innate and...

Data from: Range-wide snow leopard phylogeography supports three subspecies

Jan E. Janecka, Yu-Quang Zhang, Di-Qiang Li, Munkhtsog Bariushaa, Bayaraa Munkhtsog, Galsandorj Naranbaatar, Wangchuk R. Tshewang, Karmacharya Dibesh, McCarthy Thomas, Li Juan, Zhi Lu, Zhumabai Uulu Kubanychbek, Gaur Ajay, Kumar Satish, B. Kumar Kesav, Hussain Shafqat, Muhammad Ghulam, Jevit Matthew, Hacker Charlotte, Burger Pamela, Wultsch Claudia, Janecka J. Mary, Helgen Kristofer, Murphy J. William & Jackson Rodney
The snow leopard, Panthera uncia, is an elusive high-altitude specialist that inhabits vast, inaccessible habitat across Asia. We conducted the first range-wide genetic assessment of snow leopards based on noninvasive scat surveys. Thirty-three microsatellites were genotyped and a total of 683-bp of mitochondrial DNA sequenced in 70 individuals. Snow leopards exhibited low genetic diversity at microsatellites (AN = 5.8, HO = 0.433, HE = 0.568), virtually no mtDNA variation, and underwent a bottleneck in the...

Data from: Feeding capability in the extinct giant Siamogale melilutra and comparative mandibular biomechanics of living Lutrinae

Z. Jack Tseng, Denise F. Su, Xiaoming Wang, Stuart C. White & Xueping Ji
At 50 kg in estimated weight, the extinct Siamogale melilutra is larger than all living otters, and ranks among the largest fossil otters. The biomechanical capability of S. melilutra jaws as related to their large size is unknown but crucial to reconstructing the species’ potentially unique ecological niche. Here we compare the mandibular biomechanics of S. melilutra using engineering-based performance measures against ten extant otter biomechanical models. Despite a wide range of feeding preferences from...

Data from: Primate diversification inferred from phylogenies and fossils

James P. Herrera
Biodiversity arises from the balance between speciation and extinction. Fossils record the origins and disappearance of organisms, and the branching patterns of molecular phylogenies allow estimation of speciation and extinction rates, but the patterns of diversification are frequently incongruent between these two data sources. I tested two hypotheses about the diversification of primates based on ~600 fossil species and 90% complete phylogenies of living species: 1) diversification rates increased through time; 2) a significant extinction...

Data from: Malagasy cichlids differentially limit impacts of body shape evolution on oral jaw functional morphology

Christopher M. Martinez & John Steven Sparks
Patterns of trait covariation, like integration and modularity, are vital factors that influence the evolution of vertebrate body plans. In functional systems, decoupling of morphological modules buffers functional change in one trait by reducing correlated variation with another. However, for complex morphologies with many-to-one mapping of form to function (MTOM), resistance to functional change may also be achieved by constraining morphological variation within a functionally stable region of morphospace. For this research, we used geometric...

Data from: Resolving a phylogenetic hypothesis for parrots: implications from systematics to conservation

Kaiya L. Provost, Leo Joseph & Brian Tilston Smith
Advances in sequencing technology and phylogenetics have revolutionised avian biology by providing an evolutionary framework for studying natural groupings. In the parrots (Psittaciformes), DNA-based studies have led to a reclassification of clades, yet substantial gaps remain in the data gleaned from genetic information. Here we provide an overview of published genetic data of parrots, characterise sampling depth across the phylogeny, and evaluate support for existing systematic treatments. We inferred a concatenated tree with 307 species...

Data from: Climatic suitability, isolation by distance and river resistance explain genetic variation in a Brazilian whiptail lizard

Eliana F. Oliveira, Pablo A. Martinez, Vinicius A. São-Pedro, Marcelo Gehara, Frank T. Burbrink, Daniel O. Mesquita, Adrian A. Garda, Guarino R. Colli & Gabriel C. Costa
Spatial patterns of genetic variation can help understand how environmental factors either permit or restrict gene flow and create opportunities for regional adaptations. Organisms from harsh environments such as the Brazilian semiarid Caatinga biome may reveal how severe climate conditions may affect patterns of genetic variation. Herein we combine information from mitochondrial DNA with physical and environmental features to study the association between different aspects of the Caatinga landscape and spatial genetic variation in the...

Data from: Evaluating behavioral responses of nesting lesser snow geese to unmanned aircraft surveys

Andrew Barnas, Robert Newman, Christopher J. Felege, Michael P. Corcoran, Samuel D. Hervey, Tanner J. Stechmann, Robert F. Rockwell & Susan N. Ellis-Felege
Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are relatively new technologies gaining popularity among wildlife biologists. As with any new tool in wildlife science, operating protocols must be developed through rigorous protocol testing. Few studies have been conducted that quantify the impacts UAS may have on unhabituated individuals in the wild using standard aerial survey protocols. We evaluated impacts of unmanned surveys by measuring UAS-induced behavioral responses during the nesting phase of lesser snow geese (Anser caerulescens caerulescens)...

Data from: Host conservatism, geography, and elevation in the evolution of a Neotropical moth radiation

Joshua P. Jahner, Matthew L. Forister, Thomas L. Parchman, Angela M. Smilanich, James S. Miller, Joseph S. Wilson, Thomas R. Walla, Eric J. Tepe, Lora A. Richards, Mario A. Quijano-Abril, Andrea E. Glassmire & Lee A. Dyer
The origins of evolutionary radiations are often traced to the colonization of novel adaptive zones, including unoccupied habitats or unutilized resources. For herbivorous insects, the predominant mechanism of diversification is typically assumed to be a shift onto a novel lineage of host plants. However, other drivers of diversification are important in shaping evolutionary history, especially for groups residing in regions with complex geological histories. We evaluated the contributions of shifts in host plant clade, bioregion,...

Data from: Worldwide exploration of the microbiome harbored by the cnidarian model, Exaiptasia pallida (Agassiz in Verrill, 1864) indicates a lack of bacterial association specificity at a lower taxonomic rank

Tanya Brown, Christopher Otero, Alejandro Grajales, Estefania Rodriguez & Mauricio Rodriguez-Lanetty
Examination of host-microbe interactions in early diverging metazoans, such as cnidarians, is of great interest from an evolutionary perspective to understand how host-microbial consortia have evolved. To address this problem, we analyzed whether the bacterial community associated with the cosmopolitan and model sea anemone Exaiptasia pallida shows specific patterns across worldwide populations ranging from the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. By comparing sequences of the V1–V3 hypervariable regions of the bacterial 16S...

Data from: Multiple independent colonizations into the Congo Basin during the continental radiation of African Mastacembelus spiny eels

Julia J. Day, Antonie Fages, Katherine J. Brown, Emmanuel J. Vreven, Melanie L. J. Stiassny, Roger Bills, John P. Friel, Lukas Rüber & Antoine Fages
Aim: There has been recent interest in the origin and assembly of continental biotas based on densely sampled species-level clades, however, studies from African freshwaters are few so that the commonality of macroevolutionary patterns and processes among continental clades remain to be tested. Within the Afrotropics, the Congo Basin contains the highest diversity of riverine fishes, yet it is unclear how this fauna was assembled. To address this, and the diversification dynamics of a continental...

Data from: Widespread gene flow between oceans in a pelagic seabird species complex

Claire Raisin, Deborah A. Dawson, Helen Hipperson, Gavin J. Horsburgh, Jim J. Groombridge, Stefanie M.H. Ismar, Paul Sweet, Carl G. Jones, Vikash Tatayah, Kevin Ruhomaun, Norris Ken, Katherine A. Booth Jones, Malcolm A.C. Nicoll, Malcolm A. C. Nicoll, Ken Norris & Stefanie M. H. Ismar
Global-scale gene flow is an important concern in conservation biology as it has the potential to either increase or decrease genetic diversity in species and populations. Although many studies focus on the gene flow between different populations of a single species, the potential for gene flow and introgression between species is understudied, particularly in seabirds. The only well-studied example of a mixed-species, hybridizing population of petrels exists on Round Island, in the Indian Ocean. Previous...

Data from: How well does a part represent the whole? A comparison of cranidial shape evolution with exoskeletal character evolution in the trilobite family Pterocephaliidae

Melanie Jane Hopkins
For taphonomic and practical reasons, our understanding of morphological evolution within and among species is based primarily on measurements taken from one or a few morphological traits. However, patterns can be highly dependent on trait choice, making it difficult to draw conclusions about evolution of species or clades as a whole. In this paper, I test whether patterns of evolutionary change in the shape of a part are coincident with patterns of evolutionary change based...

Data from: Population structure of a widespread bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) in an island system

Kelly A. Speer, Brandi Jo Petronio, Nancy B. Simmons, Rebecca Richey, Kristin Magrini, J. Angel Soto-Centeno & David L. Reed
Dispersal is a driving factor in the creation and maintenance of biodiversity, yet little is known about the effects of habitat variation and geography on dispersal and population connectivity in most mammalian groups. Bats of the family Molossidae are fast-flying mammals thought to have potentially high dispersal ability, and recent studies have indicated gene flow across hundreds of kilometers in continental North American populations of the Brazilian free-tailed bat, Tadarida brasiliensis. We examined the population...

Data from: Multi-DICE: R package for comparative population genomic inference under hierarchical co-demographic models of independent single-population size changes

Alexander T. Xue & Michael J. Hickerson
Population genetic data from multiple taxa can address comparative phylogeographic questions about community-scale response to environmental shifts, and a useful strategy to this end is to employ hierarchical co-demographic models that directly test multi-taxa hypotheses within a single, unified analysis while benefiting in statistical power from aggregating datasets. This approach has been applied to classical phylogeographic datasets such as mitochondrial barcodes as well as reduced-genome polymorphism datasets that can yield 10,000s of SNPs, produced by...

Data from: The challenge of modeling niches and distributions for data-poor species: a comprehensive approach to model complexity

Peter J. Galante, Babatunde Alade, Robert Muscarella, Sharon A. Jansa, Steven M. Goodman & Robert P. Anderson
Models of species ecological niches and geographic distributions now represent a widely used tool in ecology, evolution, and biogeography. However, the very common situation of species with few available occurrence localities presents major challenges for such modeling techniques, in particular regarding model complexity and evaluation. Here, we summarize the state of the field regarding these issues and provide a worked example using the technique Maxent for a small mammal endemic to Madagascar (the nesomyine rodent...

Data from: Genomic evidence reveals a radiation of placental mammals uninterrupted by the KPg boundary

Liang Liu, Jin Zhang, Frank E. Rheindt, Fumin Lei, Yanhua Qu, Yu Wang, Yu Zhang, Corwin Sullivan, Wenhui Nie, Jinhuan Wang, Fengtang Yang, Jinping Chen, Scott V. Edwards, Jin Meng & Shaoyuan Wu
The timing of the diversification of placental mammals relative to the Cretaceous–Paleogene (KPg) boundary mass extinction remains highly controversial. In particular, there have been seemingly irreconcilable differences in the dating of the early placental radiation not only between fossil-based and molecular datasets but also among molecular datasets. To help resolve this discrepancy, we performed genome-scale analyses using 4,388 loci from 90 taxa, including representatives of all extant placental orders and transcriptome data from flying lemurs...

Data from: A new genus of horse from Pleistocene North America

Peter D. Heintzman, Grant D. Zazula, Ross D.E. MacPhee, Eric Scott, James A. Cahill, Brianna K. McHorse, Joshua D. Kapp, Mathias Stiller, Matthew J. Wooller, Ludovic Orlando, John R. Southon, Duane G. Froese, Beth Shapiro & John Southon
The extinct “New World stilt-legged”, or NWSL, equids constitute a perplexing group of Pleistocene horses endemic to North America. Their slender distal limb bones resemble those of Asiatic asses, such as the Persian onager. Previous palaeogenetic studies, however, have suggested a closer relationship to caballine horses than to Asiatic asses. Here, we report complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes from NWSL equids from across their geographic range. Although multiple NWSL equid species have been named,...

Data from: The genetic architecture of ecological adaptation: intraspecific variation in host plant use by the lepidopteran crop pest Chloridea virescens

Sara J. Oppenheim, Fred Gould & Keith R. Hopper
Intraspecific variation in ecologically important traits is a cornerstone of Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection. The evolution and maintenance of this variation depends on genetic architecture, which in turn determines responses to natural selection. Some models suggest that traits with complex architectures are less likely to respond to selection than those with simple architectures, yet rapid divergence has been observed in such traits. The simultaneous evolutionary lability and genetic complexity of host plant...

Data from: Why are tropical mountain passes ‘low’ for some species? genetic and stable-isotope tests for differentiation, migration, and expansion in elevational generalist songbirds

Chauncey R. Gadek, Seth D. Newsome, Elizabeth J. Beckman, Andrea N. Chavez, Spencer C. Galen, Emil Bautista & Christopher C. Witt
1.Most tropical bird species have narrow elevational ranges, likely reflecting climatic specialization. This is consistent with Janzen's Rule, the tendency for mountain passes to be effectively ‘higher’ in the tropics. Hence, those few tropical species that occur across broad elevational gradients (elevational generalists) represent a contradiction to Janzen's Rule. 2.Here we aim to address the following questions. Are elevational generalists being sundered by diversifying selection along the gradient? Does elevational movement cause these species to...

Data from: Isolation with asymmetric gene flow during the nonsynchronous divergence of dry forest birds

Jessica A. Oswald, Isaac Overcast, , Michael J. Andersen & Brian Tilston Smith
Dry forest bird communities in South America are often fragmented by intervening mountains and rainforests, generating high local endemism. The historical assembly of dry forest communities likely results from dynamic processes linked to numerous population histories among codistributed species. Nevertheless, species may diversify in the same way through time if landscape and environmental features, or species ecologies, similarly structure populations. Here we tested whether six co-distributed taxon pairs that occur in the dry forests of...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    22

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22

Affiliations

  • American Museum of Natural History
    22
  • Queens College, CUNY
    3
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • University of New Mexico
    2
  • Royal Museum for Central Africa
    1
  • City University of New York
    1
  • National University of San Marcos
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1