51 Works

Data from: Phylogenomic signatures of ancient introgression in a rogue lineage of darters (Teleostei: Percidae)

Daniel J. MacGuigan & Thomas J. Near
Evolutionary history is typically portrayed as a branching phylogenetic tree, yet not all evolution proceeds in a purely bifurcating manner. Introgressive hybridization is one process that results in reticulate evolution. Most known examples of genome-wide introgression occur among closely related species with relatively recent common ancestry; however, we present evidence for ancient hybridization and genome-wide introgression between major stem lineages of darters, a species-rich clade of North American freshwater fishes. Previous attempts to resolve the...

Data from: Genome-wide assessment of diversity and divergence among extant Galápagos giant tortoise species

Joshua M. Miller, Maud C. Quinzin, Danielle L. Edwards, Deren A.R. Eaton, Evelyn L. Jensen, Michael A. Russello, James P. Gibbs, Washington Tapia, Danny Rueda, Adalgisa Caccone & Deren A R Eaton
Genome-wide assessments allow for fuller characterization of genetic diversity, finer-scale population delineation, and better detection of demographically significant units to guide conservation compared to those based on “traditional” markers. Galapagos giant tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) have long provided a case study for how evolutionary genetics may be applied to advance species conservation. Ongoing efforts to bolster tortoise populations, which have declined by 90%, have been informed by analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequence and microsatellite genotypic data,...

Data from: Developmental shifts in social cognition: socio-emotional biases across the lifespan in rhesus monkeys

Alexandra G. Rosati, Alyssa M. Arre, Michael L. Platt & Laurie R. Santos
Humans exhibit a suite of developmental changes in social cognition across the lifespan. To what extent are these developmental patterns unique? We first review several social domains in which humans undergo critical ontogenetic changes in socio-cognitive processing, including social attention and theory of mind. We then examine whether one human developmental transition—a shift in socioemotional preferences—also occurs in nonhuman primates. Specifically, we experimentally measured socioemotional processing in a large population of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)...

Data from: Molecular evolution of key metabolic genes during transitions to C4 and CAM photosynthesis

Eric W. Goolsby, Abigail J. Moore, Lillian P. Hancock, Jurriaan M. De Vos & Erika J. Edwards
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Next-generation sequencing facilitates rapid production of well-sampled phylogenies built from very large genetic datasets, which can then be subsequently exploited to examine the molecular evolution of the genes themselves. We present an evolutionary analysis of 83 gene families (19 containing carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) genes, 64 containing non-CCM genes) in the portullugo clade (Caryophyllales), a diverse lineage of mostly arid-adapted plants that contains multiple evolutionary origins of all known photosynthesis types in...

Data from: Urban rat races: spatial population genomics of brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) compared across multiple cities

Matthew Combs, Kaylee A. Byers, Bruno M. Ghersi, Michael J. Blum, Adalgisa Caccone, Federico Costa, Chelsea G. Himsworth, Jonathan L. Richardson & Jason Munshi-South
Urbanization often substantially influences animal movement and gene flow. However, few studies to date have examined gene flow of the same species across multiple cities. In this study, we examine brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) to test hypotheses about the repeatability of neutral evolution across four cities: Salvador, Brazil; New Orleans, USA; Vancouver, Canada; New York City, USA. At least 150 rats were sampled from each city and genotyped for a minimum of 15,000 genome-wide SNPs....

Data from: Destabilizing mutations encode nongenetic variation that drives evolutionary innovation

Katherine L. Petrie, Nathan D. Palmer, Daniel T. Johnson, Sarah J. Medina, Stephanie J. Yan, Victor Li, Alita R. Burmeister & Justin R. Meyer
Evolutionary innovations are often achieved by repurposing existing genes to perform new functions; however, the mechanisms enabling the transition from old to new remain controversial. We identified mutations in bacteriophage λ’s host-recognition gene J that confer enhanced adsorption to λ’s native receptor, LamB, and the ability to access a new receptor, OmpF. The mutations destabilize particles and cause conformational bistability of J, which yields progeny of multiple phenotypic forms, each proficient at different receptors. This...

Data from: Genomic analysis of morphometric traits in bighorn sheep using the Ovine Infinium® HD SNP BeadChip

Joshua M. Miller, Marco Festa-Bianchet & David W. Coltman
Elucidating the genetic basis of fitness-related traits is a major goal of molecular ecology. Traits subject to sexual selection are particularly interesting, as non-random mate choice should deplete genetic variation and thereby their evolutionary benefits. We examined the genetic basis of three sexually selected morphometric traits in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis): horn length, horn base circumference, and body mass. These traits are of specific concern in bighorn sheep as artificial selection through trophy hunting opposes...

Data from: Are there general laws for digit evolution in squamates? The loss and re-evolution of digits in a clade of fossorial lizards (Brachymeles, Scincinae)

Günter P. Wagner, Oliver W. Griffith, Philip J. Bergmann, Gaelle Bello-Hellegouarch, Tiana Kohlsdorf, Anjan Bhullar & Cameron D. Siler
Evolutionary simplification of autopodial structures is a major theme in studies of body‐form evolution. Previous studies on amniotes have supported Morse's law, that is, that the first digit reduced is Digit I, followed by Digit V. Furthermore, the question of reversibility for evolutionary digit loss and its implications for “Dollo's law” remains controversial. Here, we provide an analysis of limb and digit evolution for the skink genus Brachymeles. Employing phylogenetic, morphological, osteological, and myological data,...

Data from: A spatial genetics approach to inform vector control of tsetse flies (Glossina fuscipes fuscipes) in Northern Uganda

Norah Saarman, Mary Burak, Robert Opiro, Chaz Hyseni, Richard Echodu, Kirstin Dion, Elizabeth A. Opiyo, Augustine W. Dunn, Giuseppe Amatulli, Serap Aksoy & Adalgisa Caccone
Tsetse flies (genus Glossina) are the only vector for the parasitic trypanosomes responsible for sleeping sickness and nagana across sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda, the tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes fuscipes is responsible for transmission of the parasite in 90% of sleeping sickness cases, and co-occurrence of both forms of human-infective trypanosomes makes vector control a priority. We use population genetic data from 38 samples from northern Uganda in a novel methodological pipeline that integrates genetic data,...

Data from: Two pulses of morphological diversification in Pacific pelagic fishes following the Cretaceous–Palaeogene mass extinction

Elizabeth Sibert, Matthew Friedman, Pincelli Hull, Gene Hunt, Richard Norris & Matt Friedman
Molecular phylogenies suggest some major radiations of open-ocean fish clades occurred roughly coincident with the K/Pg boundary, however the timing and nature of this diversification is poorly constrained. Here we investigate evolutionary patterns in ray-finned fishes across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K/Pg) Mass Extinction 66 million years ago (Ma), using microfossils (isolated teeth) preserved in a South Pacific sediment core spanning 72-43 Ma. Our record does not show significant turnover of fish tooth morphotypes at the K/Pg...

Data from: Interspecific variation in conspecific negative density dependence can make species less likely to coexist

Simon Maccracken Stump & Liza S. Comita
Conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD) is thought to promote plant species diversity. Theoretical studies showing the importance of CNDD often assumed that all species are equally susceptible to CNDD; however, recent empirical studies have shown species can differ greatly in their susceptibility to CNDD. Using a theoretical model, we show that interspecific variation in CNDD can dramatically alter its impact on diversity. First, if the most common species are the least regulated by CNDD, then...

Data from: A well-preserved respiratory system in a Silurian ostracod

David J. Siveter, Derek E.G. Briggs, Derek J. Siveter, Mark D. Sutton & Derek E. G. Briggs
Ostracod crustaceans are diverse and ubiquitous in aqueous environments today but relatively few known species have gills. Ostracods are the most abundant fossil arthropods but examples of soft-part preservation, especially of gills, are exceptionally rare. A new ostracod, Spiricopia aurita (Myodocopa), from the marine Silurian Herefordshire Lagerstätte (430 Mya), UK, preserves appendages, lateral eyes and gills. The respiratory system includes five pairs of gill lamellae with hypobranchial and epibranchial canals that conveyed hemolymph. A heart...

Data from: Genetic pedigree analysis of the pilot breeding program for the rediscovered Galapagos giant tortoise from Floreana island

Joshua M. Miller, Maud C. Quinzin, Elizabeth H. Scheibe, Claudio Ciofi, Fredy Villalva, Washington Tapia & Adalgisa Caccone
An aim of many captive breeding programs is to increase population sizes for reintroduction and establishment of self-sustaining wild populations. Genetic analyses play a critical role in these programs: monitoring genetic variation, identifying the origin of individuals, and assigning parentage to track family sizes. Here we use genetic pedigree analyses to examine three seasons of a pilot breeding program for the Floreana island Galapagos giant tortoise, C. niger, that had been declared extinct for ~150...

Data from: Acceleration or deceleration of litter decomposition by herbivory depends on nutrient availability through intraspecific differences in induced plant resistance traits

Karin T. Burghardt, Mark A. Bradford & Oswald J. Schmitz
1. Herbivores often induce changes in plant defensive chemistry or nutrient content that may respectively inhibit or promote microbial decomposition of senesced litter. Often the directional impact of herbivores on decomposition is considered to be a property of a species or ecosystem. While rarely explored, intraspecific plasticity in the induction of defensive strategies across environmental gradients may also result in divergent impacts of herbivores on decomposition (deceleration vs. acceleration). 2. Here, we examined how soil...

Data from: Individual-level trait variation and negative density dependence affects growth in tropical tree seedlings

Maria Natalia Umana, Elise F. Zipkin, Caicai Zhang, Min Cao, Luxiang Lin & Nathan G. Swenson
1. Individual-level interactions with neighbours and their surrounding environments are key factors influencing performance that ultimately shape and maintain diversity in tropical plant communities. Theory predicts that the strength of these interactions depends on the similarity among neighbours, the turnover in composition caused by individuals that enter as new recruits and individuals that die, and fitting to local conditions. Despite considerable phenotypic variation among individuals and high community dynamics, these three factors have rarely been...

Data from: Experimentally-induced variation in neuroendocrine processes affects male reproductive behavior, sperm characteristics, and social interactions

Bridget M. Nugent, Kelly A. Stiver, Hans A. Hofmann & Suzanne H. Alonzo
While extensive research has focused on how social interactions evolve, the fitness consequences of the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these interactions have rarely been documented, especially in the wild. Here, we measure how the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying male behavior affecting mating success and sperm competition in the ocellated wrasse (Symphodus ocellatus). In this species, males exhibit three alternative reproductive types. ‘Nesting males’ provide parental care, defend territories, and form cooperative associations with unrelated ‘satellites’, who cheat...

Data from: Multifactorial processes underlie parallel opsin loss in neotropical bats

Alexa Sadier, Kalina T. J. Davies, Laurel R. Yohe, Kun Yun, Paul Donat, Brandon P. Hedrick, Elizabeth R. Dumont, Liliana M. Davalos, Stephen J. Rossiter & Karen E. Sears
The loss of previously adaptive traits is typically linked to relaxation in selection, yet the molecular steps leading to such repeated losses are rarely known. Molecular studies of loss have tended to focus on gene sequences alone, but overlooking other aspects of protein expression might underestimate phenotypic diversity. Insights based almost solely on opsin gene evolution, for instance, have made mammalian color vision a textbook example of phenotypic loss. We address this gap by investigating...

Data from: The population genomics of multiple tsetse fly (Glossina fuscipes fuscipes) admixture zones in Uganda

Norah P. Saarman, Robert Opiro, Chaz Hyseni, Richard Echodu, Elizabeth A. Opiyo, Kirstin Dion, Thomas Johnson, Serap Aksoy & Adalgisa Caccone
Understanding the mechanisms that enforce, maintain, or reverse the process of speciation is an important challenge in evolutionary biology. This study investigates the patterns of divergence and discusses the processes that form and maintain divergent lineages of the tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes fuscipes in Uganda. We sampled 251 flies from 18 sites spanning known genetic lineages and the four admixture zones between them. We apply population genomics, hybrid zone, and approximate Bayesian computation to the...

Data from: Oxygen, temperature and the deep-marine stenothermal cradle of Ediacaran evolution

Thomas H. Boag, Richard G. Stockey, Leanne E. Elder, Pincelli M. Hull & Erik A. Sperling
Ediacaran fossils document the early evolution of complex megascopic life, contemporaneous with geochemical evidence for widespread marine anoxia. These data suggest early animals experienced frequent hypoxia. Research has thus focused on the concentration of molecular oxygen (O2) required by early animals, while also considering the impacts of climate. One model, the Cold Cradle hypothesis, proposed the Ediacaran biota originated in cold, shallow-water environments due to increased O2 solubility. First, we demonstrate using principles of gas...

Data from: Trophic ecology of large herbivores in a reassembling African ecosystem

Johan Pansu, Jennifer A. Guyton, Arjun B. Potter, Justine L. Atkins, Joshua H. Daskin, Bart Wursten, Tyler R. Kartzinel & Robert M. Pringle
1. Diverse megafauna assemblages have declined or disappeared throughout much of the world, and many efforts are underway to restore them. Understanding the trophic ecology of such reassembling systems is necessary for predicting recovery dynamics, guiding management, and testing general theory. Yet there are few studies of recovering large-mammal communities, and fewer still that have characterized food-web structure with high taxonomic resolution. 2. In Gorongosa National Park, large herbivores have rebounded from near-extirpation following the...

Replication data for “Can you take the heat?\" Heat-health symptoms are associated with protective behaviors

Emily D. Esplin, Jennifer R. Marlon, Anthony Leiserowitz & Peter Howe
This dataset contains survey data of the U.S. adult population that includes self-reported heat-health symptoms, protective behaviors implemented during heat waves, and perceptions of how a heat wave would affect personal health and the health of others. Temperature estimates of what participants may have experienced the summer prior to the survey are included at the county level. Demographic variables and spatial scales by region, state, and county are also included.

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure of the tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Diptera: Glossinidae) in Northern Uganda: implications for vector control

Robert Opiro, Norah P. Saarman, Richard Echodu, Elizabeth A. Opiyo, Kirstin Dion, Alexis Halyard, Augustine W. Dunn, Serap Aksoy, Adalgisa Caccone & Philippe Solano
Uganda is the only country where the chronic and acute forms of human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness both occur and are separated by < 100 km in areas north of Lake Kyoga. In Uganda, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes is the main vector of the Trypanosoma parasites responsible for these diseases as well for the animal African Trypanosomiasis (AAT), or Nagana. We used highly polymorphic microsatellite loci and a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker to provide...

Data from: The interplay of past diversification and evolutionary isolation with present imperilment across the amphibian tree of life

Walter Jetz & R. Alexander Pyron
Human activities continue to erode the tree of life, requiring us to prioritize research and conservation. Amphibians represent key victims and bellwethers of global change, and the need for action to conserve them is drastically outpacing knowledge. We provide a phylogeny incorporating nearly all extant amphibians (7,238 species). Current amphibian diversity is composed of both older, depauperate lineages and extensive, more recent tropical radiations found in select clades. Frog and salamander diversification increased strongly after...

Data from: The Palaeozoic colonization of the water column and the rise of global nekton

Christopher D. Whalen, Derek E.G. Briggs & Derek E. G. Briggs
The colonization of the water column is among the most important transformations in the evolution of animal life and global ecosystems. The Devonian Nekton Revolution (DNR) has been identified as a major macroevolutionary event signifying the sudden occupation of the water column by independent radiations of swimming animals. Using new data, an expanded taxonomic coverage, sample standardization, and increased ecological resolution, we reanalysed the timing, duration, and magnitude of this event. We find that nekton...

Data from: Organic matter and nutrient inputs from large wildlife influence ecosystem function in the Mara River, Africa

Amanda L. Subalusky, Christopher L. Dutton, Laban Njoroge, Emma J. Rosi & David M. Post
Animals can be important vectors for the movement of resources across ecosystem boundaries. Animals add resources to ecosystems primarily through egestion, excretion and carcasses, and the stoichiometry and bioavailability of these inputs likely interacts with characteristics of the recipient ecosystem to determine their effects on ecosystem function. We studied the influence of hippopotamus excretion/egestion and wildebeest carcasses, and their interactions with discharge, in the Mara River, Kenya. We measured nutrient dissolution and decomposition rates of...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    51

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    51

Affiliations

  • Yale University
    51
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    6
  • University of Pennsylvania
    4
  • University of California, San Diego
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
    3
  • University of Basel
    3
  • Gulu University
    3
  • University of California Los Angeles
    3
  • National Museums of Kenya
    3