452 Works

Data from: Evolutionary trade-offs in the chemical defense of floral and fruit tissues across genus Cornus

Chase M. Mason, Danielle R. De La Pascua, Corrinne Smith-Winterscheidt, Jordan A. Dowell & Eric W. Goolsby
Premise of the study Defense investment in plant reproductive structures is relatively understudied compared to the defense of vegetative organs. Here the evolution of chemical defenses in reproductive structures is examined in light of the optimal defense, apparency, and resource availability hypotheses within the genus Cornus using a phylogenetic comparative approach in relation to phenology and native habitat environmental data. Methods Individuals representing 25 Cornus species were tracked for reproductive phenology over a full growing...

Data from: Selection of Pairings Reaching Evenly Across the Data (SPREAD): a simple algorithm to design maximally informative fully crossed mating experiments

Kolea Zimmerman, Daniel Levitis, Ethan Addicott & Anne Pringle
We present a novel algorithm for the design of crossing experiments. The algorithm identifies a set of individuals (a "crossing-set") from a larger pool of potential crossing-sets by maximizing the diversity of traits of interest, for example, maximizing the range of genetic and geographic distances between individuals included in the crossing-set. To calculate diversity, we use the mean nearest neighbor distance of crosses plotted in trait space. We implement our algorithm on a real dataset...

Data from: Morphological and genomic comparisons of Hawaiian and Japanese Black-footed Albatrosses (Phoebastria nigripes) using double digest RADseq: implications for conservation

Elisa G. Dierickx, Allison J. Shultz, Fumio Sato, Takashi Hiraoka & Scott V. Edwards
Evaluating the genetic and demographic independence of populations of threatened species is important for determining appropriate conservation measures, but different technologies can yield different conclusions. Despite multiple studies, the taxonomic status and extent of gene flow between the main breeding populations of Black-footed Albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), a Near-Threatened philopatric seabird, are still controversial. Here, we employ double digest RADseq to quantify the extent of genomewide divergence and gene flow in this species. Our genomewide data...

Data from: Biological traits, phylogeny and human footprint signatures on the geographic range size of passerines (Order Passeriformes) worldwide

Miguel Ángel Olalla-Tárraga, Talita Amado, Luis Mauricio Bini, Pablo Martínez, Ignacio Morales-Castilla, Erik Joaquin Torres-Romero & Fabricio Villalobos
Aim Multiple hypotheses exist to explain the astonishing geographic range size variation across species, but these have rarely been tested under a unifying framework that simultaneously considers direct and indirect effects of ecological niche processes and evolutionary dynamics. Here, we jointly evaluate ecological and evolutionary hypotheses that may account for global interspecific patterns of range size in the most species-rich avian order: Passeriformes (perching birds). Location Global Time period CurrentMajor taxa studied Order Passeriformes Methods...

Data from: Range-wide multilocus phylogeography of the red fox reveals ancient continental divergence, minimal genomic exchange, and distinct demographic histories

Mark J. Statham, Zhenghuan Wang, Carl D. Soulsbury, Jan Janecka, Benjamin N. Sacks, Keith B. Aubry, Oliver Berry, Ceiridwen J. Edwards & James Murdoch
Widely distributed taxa provide an opportunity to compare biogeographic responses to climatic fluctuations on multiple continents and to investigate speciation. We conducted the most geographically and genomically comprehensive study to date of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), the world's most widely distributed wild terrestrial carnivore. Analyses of 697 bp of mitochondrial sequence in ~1000 individuals suggested an ancient Middle Eastern origin for all extant red foxes and a 400 kya (SD = 139 kya) origin...

Data from: Exploring phylogenetic relationships within Myriapoda and the effects of matrix composition and occupancy on phylogenomic reconstruction

Rosa Fernández, Gregory D. Edgecombe & Gonzalo Giribet
Myriapods, including the diverse and familiar centipedes and millipedes, are one of the dominant terrestrial arthropod groups. Although molecular evidence has shown that Myriapoda is monophyletic, its internal phylogeny remains contentious and understudied, especially when compared to those of Chelicerata and Hexapoda. Until now, efforts have focused on taxon sampling (e.g., by including a handful of genes from many species) or on maximizing matrix size (e.g., by including hundreds or thousands of genes in just...

Data from: Breeding system evolution influenced the geographic expansion and diversification of the core Corvoidea (Aves: Passeriformes)

Petter Z. Marki, Pierre-Henri Fabre, Knud A. Jønsson, Carsten Rahbek, Jon Fjeldså & Jonathan D. Kennedy
Birds vary greatly in their life-history strategies, including their breeding systems, which range from brood parasitism to a system with multiple non-breeding helpers at the nest. By far the most common arrangement, however, is where both parents participate in raising the young. The traits associated with parental care have been suggested to affect dispersal propensity and lineage diversification, but to date tests of this potential relationship at broad temporal and spatial scales have been limited....

Transitions in paternal social status predict patterns of offspring growth and metabolic transcription

Joseph W. Cauceglia, Adam C. Nelson, Nimrod D. Rubinstein, Shweta Kukreja, Lynsey N. Sasso, John A. Beaufort, Oliver J. Rando & Wayne K. Potts
Parental effects occur when changes in the parental phenotype or environment cause changes to offspring phenotype. While some parental effects are triggered in response to an environmental cue in a time-locked fashion, other parental effects persist even after the cue has been removed, suggesting multiple timescales of action. For parental effects to serve as reliable signals of current environmental conditions, they should be reversible, such that when the cue changes, offspring phenotypes change in accordance....

Data from: Population genomics and demographic sampling of the ant-plant Vachellia drepanolobium and its symbiotic ants from sites across its range in East Africa.

John H. Boyle, Dino Martins, Paul M. Musili & Naomi E. Pierce
The association between the African ant plant, Vachellia drepanolobium, and the ants that inhabit it has provided insight into the boundaries between mutualism and parasitism, the response of symbioses to environmental perturbations, and the ecology of species coexistence. We use a landscape genomics approach at sites sampled throughout the range of this system in Kenya to investigate the demographics and genetic structure of the different partners in the association. We find that different species of...

Phototactic choices of Drosophila melanogaster

Indrikis Krams, Tatjana Krama, Ronalds Krams, Giedrius Trakimas, Sergejs Popovs, Priit Jõers, Maris Munkevics, Didzis Elferts, Markus Rantala, Janis Makna & Benjamin De Bivort
When organisms' environmental conditions vary unpredictably in time, it can be advantageous for individuals to hedge their phenotypic bets. It has been shown that a bet-hedging strategy underlies the high inter-individual diversity of phototactic choice in Drosophila melanogaster. This study shows that fruit flies from a population living in a boreal and relatively unpredictable climate had more variable phototactic choices than fruit flies from a more stable tropical climate, consistent with bet-hedging theory. We experimentally...

Ecological opportunity and the rise and fall of crocodylomorph evolutionary innovation

Thomas Stubbs, Stephanie Pierce, Armin Elsler, Philip Anderson, Emily Rayfield & Michael Benton
Understanding the origin, expansion and loss of biodiversity is fundamental to evolutionary biology. The approximately 26 living species of crocodylomorphs (crocodiles, caimans, alligators and gharials) represent just a snapshot of the group’s rich 230-million-year history, whereas the fossil record reveals a hidden past of great diversity and innovation, including ocean and land-dwelling forms, herbivores, omnivores and apex predators. In this macroevolutionary study of skull and jaw shape disparity, we show that crocodylomorph ecomorphological variation peaked...

Habitat structure mediates vulnerability to climate change through its effects on thermoregulatory behavior

Lauren Neel, Michael Logan, Daniel Nicholson, Christina Miller, Albert Chung, Inbar Maayan, Zach Degon, Madeline DuBois, John David Curlis, Q Taylor, Kaitlin Keegan, Owen McMillan, Jonathan Losos & Christian Cox
Tropical ectotherms are thought to be especially vulnerable to climate change because they are thermal specialists, having evolved in aseasonal thermal environments. However, even within the tropics, habitat structure can influence opportunities for behavioral thermoregulation. Open (and edge) habitats likely promote more effective thermoregulation due to the high spatial heterogeneity of the thermal landscape, while forests are thermally homogenous and may constrain opportunities for behavioral buffering of environmental temperatures. Nevertheless, the ways in which behavior...

Data from: Early origin of sweet perception in the songbird radiation

Yasuka Toda, Meng-Ching Ko, Qiaoyi Liang, Eliot Miller, Alejandro Rico-Guevara, Tomoya Nakagita, Ayano Sakakibara, Kana Uemura, Timothy Sackton, Takashi Hayakawa, Simon Yung Wa Sin, Yoshiro Ishimaru, Takumi Misaka, Pablo Oteiza, James Crall, Scott Edwards, Shuichi Matsumura & Maude Baldwin
Early events in the evolutionary history of a clade can shape the sensory systems of descendant lineages. Although the avian ancestor may not have had a sweet receptor, the widespread incidence of nectar-feeding birds suggests multiple acquisitions of sugar detection. In this study, we identify a single early sensory shift of the umami receptor (the T1R1-T1R3 heterodimer) that conferred sweet-sensing abilities in songbirds, a large radiation containing nearly half of all living birds. We demonstrate...

Cambrian comb jellies from Utah illuminate the early evolution of nervous and sensory systems in ctenophores - Phylogenetic dataset

Luke Parry, Rudy Lerosey Aubril, James Weaver & Javier Ortega-Hernández
Ctenophores are a group of predatory macroinvertebrates whose controversial phylogenetic position has prompted several competing hypotheses regarding the evolution of animal organ systems. Although ctenophores date back at least to the Cambrian, they have a poor fossil record due to their gelatinous bodies. Here, we describe two ctenophore species from the Cambrian of Utah, which illuminate the early evolution of nervous and sensory features in the phylum. Thalassostaphylos elegans has 16 comb rows, an oral...

Allometric escape from acoustic constraints in frog calls is rare

Joao Filipe Tonini, Diogo Provete, Natan Maciel, Alessandro Morais, Sandra Goutte, Felipe Toledo & R. Alexander Pyron
Allometric constraint is a product of natural selection, particularly with respect to body size and traits constrained by physical properties thereof, such as metabolism, longevity, and vocal frequency. Parameters describing allometric relationships are conserved across most lineages, indicating that physical constraints dictate scaling patterns in deep time, despite substantial genetic and ecological divergence among organisms. Acoustic allometry (sound frequency ~ body size) is conserved across frogs, in defiance of massive variation in both body size...

Coping with impostor feelings: evidence-based recommendations from a mixed methods study

Jill Barr-Walker, Debra A. Werner, Liz Kellermeyer & Michelle B. Bass
The negative effects of impostor phenomenon, also called impostor syndrome, include burnout and decreased job satisfaction and have led to an increased interest in addressing this issue in libraries in recent years. While previous research has shown that many librarians experience impostor phenomenon, the experience of coping with these feelings has not been widely studied. Our study’s aim was to understand how health sciences librarians cope with impostor phenomenon in the workplace, using a quantitative...

No state change in pelagic fish production and biodiversity during the Eocene-Oligocene Transition

Elizabeth Sibert, Michelle Zill, Ella Frigyik & Richard Norris
The Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) boundary ~33.9 million years ago, has been described as a state change in the Earth system marked by the permanent glaciation of Antarctica and a proposed increase in oceanic productivity. Here we quantified the response of fish production and biodiversity to this event using microfossil fish teeth (ichthyoliths) in seven deep-sea sediment cores from around the world. Ichthyolith accumulation rate (a proxy for fish biomass production) shows no synchronous trends across the...

Phylogeographic and phenotypic outcomes of brown anole colonization across the Caribbean provide insight into the beginning stages of an adaptive radiation

Jason J. Kolbe, Richard E. Glor, Marta López‐Darias, C. Verónica Gómez Pourroy, Alexis S. Harrison, Kevin De Queiroz, Liam J. Revell, Jonathan B. Losos & Robert Graham Reynolds
Some of the most important insights into the ecological and evolutionary processes of diversification and speciation have come from studies of island adaptive radiations, yet relatively little research has examined how these radiations initiate. We suggest that Anolis sagrei is a candidate for understanding the origins of the Caribbean Anolis adaptive radiation and how a colonizing anole species begins to undergo allopatric diversification, phenotypic divergence and, potentially, speciation. We undertook a genomic and morphological analysis...

Risk of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in patients with Alzheimer disease: A synthesis of the literature

Reem Waziry, Lori B Chibnik, Daniel Bos, M Kamran Ikram & Hofman Albert
Objective To assess the risk of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to non-AD subjects with similar risk profiles. Methods A search was conducted on Embase and Medline for reports published up to September 26, 2018. Studies were included if they: 1) assessed incidence of stroke in patients diagnosed with AD; 2) included patients with no history of stroke; and 3) reported outcomes by stroke subtype. The main outcome was...

Demographic data collection in STEM organizations

Nicholas Burnett, Alyssa Hernandez, Emily King, Richelle Tanner & Kathryn Wilsterman
Professional organizations in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) can use demographic data to quantify recruitment and retention (R&R) of underrepresented groups within their memberships. However, variation in the types of demographic data collected can influence the targeting and perceived impacts of R&R efforts - e.g., giving false signals of R&R for some groups. We obtained demographic surveys from 73 U.S.-affiliated STEM organizations, collectively representing 712,000 members and conference-attendees. We found large differences in the...

Profiling, monitoring and conserving caterpillar fungus in the Himalayan region using anchored hybrid enrichment markers

Zhengyang Wang
The collection of caterpillar fungus accounts for 50-70% of the household income of thousands of Himalayan communities and has an estimated market value of $5-11 billion across Asia. However, Himalayan collectors are at multiple economic disadvantages compared with collectors on the Tibetan plateau because their product is not legally recognized. Using a customized hybrid-enrichment probe set and market-grade caterpillar fungus (with samples up to 30 years old) from 94 production zones across Asia, we uncovered...

Histological and life history data for small-bodied mammals from: Multituberculate mammals show evidence of a life history strategy similar to that of placentals, not marsupials

Lucas Weaver, Henry Fulghum, David Grossnickle, William Brightly, Zoe Kulik, Gregory Wilson Mantilla & Megan Whitney
The remarkable evolutionary success of placental mammals has been partly attributed to their reproductive strategy of prolonged gestation and birthing of relatively precocial, quickly weaned neonates. Although this strategy was conventionally considered derived relative to that of marsupials with highly altricial neonates and long lactation periods, mounting evidence has challenged this view. Until now, the fossil record has been relatively silent on this debate, but here we find that proportions of different bone tissue microstructures...

Changes in temperature alter competitive interactions and overall structure of fig wasp communities

Khin Me Me Aung, Huan-Huan Chen, Simon Segar, Yan-Qiong Peng & Cong Liu
1. Organisms exist within ecological networks, connected through interactions such as parasitism, predation and mutualism which can modify their abundance and distribution within habitat patches. Differential species responses make it hard to predict the influence of climate change at the community scale. Understanding the interplay between climate and biotic interactions can improve our predictions of how ecosystems will respond to current global warming. 2. We aim to understand how climate affects the multi-trophic biotic interactions...

TCCON data from Indianapolis (US), Release GGG2020.R0

L. T. Iraci, J. R. Podolske, P. W. Hillyard, C. Roehl, P. O. Wennberg, J.-F. Blavier, J. Landeros, N. Allen, D. Wunch, J. Zavaleta, E. Quigley, G. B. Osterman, E. Barrow & J. Barney
The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) is a network of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers that record direct solar absorption spectra of the atmosphere in the near-infrared. From these spectra, accurate and precise column-averaged abundances of atmospheric constituents including CO2, CH4, N2O, HF, CO, H2O, and HDO, are retrieved. This is the GGG2020 data release of observations from the TCCON station at Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Barcoded Bulk QTL mapping reveals highly polygenic and epistatic architecture of complex traits in yeast

Alex N. Nguyen Ba, Katherine Lawrence, Artur Rego-Costa, Shreyas Gopalakrishnan, Daniel Temko, Franziska Michor & Michael Desai
Mapping the genetic basis of complex traits is critical to uncovering the biological mechanisms that underlie disease and other phenotypes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in humans and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in model organisms can now explain much of the observed heritability in many traits, allowing us to predict phenotype from genotype. However, constraints on power due to statistical confounders in large GWAS and smaller sample sizes in QTL studies still limit our ability...

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