41 Works

Data from: Earth history and the passerine superradiation

Carl H. Oliveros, Daniel J. Field, Daniel T. Ksepka, F. Keith Barker, Alexandre Aleixo, Michael J. Andersen, Per Alström, Brett W. Benz, Edward L. Braun, Michael J. Braun, Gustavo A. Bravo, Robb T. Brumfield, R. Terry Chesser, Santiago Claramunt, Joel Cracraft, Andrés M. Cuervo, Elizabeth P. Derryberry, Travis C. Glenn, Michael G. Harvey, Peter A. Hosner, Leo Joseph, Rebecca T. Kimball, Andrew L. Mack, Colin M. Miskelly, A. Townsend Peterson … & Brant C. Faircloth
Avian diversification has been influenced by global climate change, plate tectonic movements, and mass extinction events. However, the impact of these factors on the diversification of the hyperdiverse perching birds (passerines) is unclear because family level relationships are unresolved and the timing of splitting events among lineages is uncertain. We analyzed DNA data from 4,060 nuclear loci and 137 passerine families using concatenation and coalescent approaches to infer a comprehensive phylogenetic hypothesis that clarifies relationships...

Data from: phenotools: an R package for visualizing and analyzing phenomic datasets

Chad M. Eliason, Scott V. Edwards & Julia A. Clarke
1.Phenotypic data is crucial for understanding genotype–phenotype relationships, assessing the tree of life, and revealing trends in trait diversity over time. Large‐scale description of whole organisms for quantitative analyses (phenomics) presents several challenges, and technological advances in the collection of genomic data outpace those for phenomic data. Reasons for this disparity include the time‐consuming and expensive nature of collecting discrete phenotypic data and mining previously‐published data on a given species (both often requiring anatomical expertise...

Data from: Structurally assisted super black in colorful peacock spiders

Dakota E. McCoy, Victoria E. McCoy, Nikolaj K. Mandsberg, Anna V. Shneidman, Joanna Aizenberg, Richard O. Prum & David Haig
Male peacock spiders (Maratus, Salticidae) compete to attract female mates using elaborate, sexually-selected displays. They evolved both brilliant color and velvety black. Here we use scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hyperspectral imaging, and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) optical modeling to investigate the deep black surfaces of peacock spiders. We found that super black regions reflect <0.5% of light (for a 30° collection angle) in Maratus speciosus (0.44%) and Maratus karrie (0.35%) due to microscale structures. Both species...

Data from: Functional performance of turtle humerus shape across an ecological adaptive landscape

Blake V Dickson & Stephanie E Pierce
The concept of the adaptive landscape has been invaluable to evolutionary biologists for visualizing the dynamics of selection and adaptation; and is increasingly being used to study morpho-functional data. Here we construct adaptive landscapes to explore functional trade-offs of humerus morphology in turtles adapted to three different locomotor environments: marine, semiaquatic, and terrestrial. Humerus shape from 40 species of cryptodire turtles was quantified using a pseudolandmark approach. Hypothetical shapes were extracted in a grid across...

Data from: Convergent regulatory evolution and loss of flight in palaeognathous birds

Timothy B. Sackton, Phil Grayson, Alison Cloutier, Zhirui Hu, Jun S. Liu, Nicole E. Wheeler, Paul P. Gardner, Julia A. Clarke, Allan J. Baker, Michele Clamp & Scott V. Edwards
A core question in evolutionary biology is whether convergent phenotypic evolution is driven by convergent molecular changes in proteins or regulatory regions. We combined phylogenomic, developmental, and epigenomic analysis of 11 new genomes of paleognathous birds, including an extinct moa, to show that convergent evolution of regulatory regions, more so than protein-coding genes, is prevalent among developmental pathways associated with independent losses of flight. A Bayesian analysis of 284,001 conserved noncoding elements, 60,665 of which...

Mechanisms of convergent egg provisioning in poison frogs

Eva K. Fischer, Alexandre B. Roland, Nora A. Moskowitz, Charles Vidoudez, Ndimbintsoa Ranaivorazo, Elicio E. Tapia, Sunia A. Trauger, Miguel Vences, Luis A. Coloma & Lauren A. O'Connell
Parental provisioning of offspring with physiological products (nursing) occurs in many animals, yet little is known about the neuroendocrine basis of nursing in non-mammalian species. Within amphibians, maternal provisioning has evolved multiple times, with mothers of some species feeding unfertilized eggs to their developing offspring until tadpoles complete metamorphosis. We conducted field studies in Ecuador and Madagascar to ask whether convergence at the behavioral level provides similar benefits to offspring and relies on shared neural...

The genetics of morphological and behavioural island traits in deer mice

Felix Baier & Hopi Hoekstra
Animals on islands often exhibit dramatic differences in morphology and behaviour compared to mainland individuals, a phenomenon known as the "island syndrome". These differences are thought to be adaptations to island environments, but the extent to which they have a genetic basis or instead represent plastic responses to environmental extremes is often unknown. Here, we revisit a classic case of island syndrome in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) from British Columbia. We first show that Saturna...

Learning from dynamic traits: Seasonal shifts yield insights into ecophysiological tradeoffs across scales from macroevolutionary to intra-individual

Chase Mason, Michael C. LaScaleia, Danielle R. De La Pascua, J. Grey Monroe & Eric W. Goolsby
Premise of the Research. Phylogenetic comparative methods provide a powerful approach for exploring the macroevolution of plant functional traits. Such approaches can uncover trait-trait correlations through evolutionary time, as well as provide evidence of the role of traits in adaptation across environmental gradients. For continuous traits, most phylogenetic comparative approaches to date employ a single trait value per species, often a mean of sampled individuals, or alternatively incorporate intraspecific variation as a distribution around such...

London Stage Database

Mattie Burkert, Will Daland, Emma Hallock, Todd Hugie, Lauren Liebe, Derek Miller, Dustin Olsen & Ben R. Schneider Jr.
Recovered files, and documents and archival data used to revitalize the London Stage Information Bank, which was completed in the 1970s but had become technologically obsolete.

Data from: Immune genes are hotspots of shared positive selection across birds and mammals

Allison J Shultz, Timothy Sackton & Timothy B Sackton
Consistent patterns of positive selection in functionally similar genes can suggest a common selective pressure across a group of species. We use alignments of orthologous protein-coding genes from 39 species of birds to estimate parameters related to positive selection for 11,000 genes conserved across birds. We show that functional pathways related to the immune system, recombination, lipid metabolism, and phototransduction are enriched for positively selected genes. By comparing our results with mammalian data, we find...

Data from: Biodiversity and thermal ecological function: the influence of freshwater algal diversity on local thermal environments

Anouch Missirian, Eyal G. Frank, Jess T. Gersony, Jason C.Y. Wong & Shahid Naeem
The influence of temperature on diversity and ecosystem functioning is well studied; the converse however, i.e. how biodiversity influences temperature, much less so. We manipulated freshwater algal species diversity in microbial microcosms to uncover how diversity influenced primary production, which is well documented in biodiversity research. We then also explored how visible-spectrum absorbance and the local thermal environment responded to biodiversity change. Variations in the local thermal environment, that is, in the temperature of the...

Revisiting the origin of octoploid strawberry

Aaron Liston, Na Wei, Jacob Tennessen, Jumin Li, Ming Dong & Ashman Tia-Lynn
The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa) is an octoploid, and the identity of its four subgenomes has long been a mystery. In their recent strawberry genome publication, Edger et al. present a novel hypothesis: each subgenome originated from a different extant diploid progenitor, and the hexaploid species Fragaria moschata was a direct ancestor. We reanalyzed the four octoploid subgenomes in a phylogenomic context and our results support only two extant diploids progenitors; we also found no...

Thoracic adaptations for ventilation during locomotion in humans and other mammals

William Callison, Daniel Lieberman & Nicholas Holowka
Bipedal humans, like canids and some other cursorial mammals, are thought to have been selected for endurance running, which requires the ability to sustain aerobic metabolism over long distances by inspiring large volumes of air for prolonged periods of time. Here we test the general hypothesis that humans and other mammals selected for vigorous endurance activities evolved derived thoracic features to increase ventilatory capacity. To do so, we investigate whether humans and dogs rely on...

Context dependence of local adaptation to abiotic and biotic environments: a quantitative and qualitative synthesis

Ryan Briscoe Runquist, Amanda Gorton, Jeremy Yoder, Nicholas Deacon, Jake Grossman, Shan Kothari, Marta Lyons, Seema Sheth, Peter Tiffin & David Moeller
Understanding how spatially-variable selection shapes adaptation is an area of longstanding interest in evolutionary ecology. Recent meta-analyses have quantified the extent of local adaptation, but the relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors in driving population divergence remains poorly understood. To address this gap, we combined a quantitative meta-analysis and a qualitative meta-synthesis to (1) quantify the magnitude of local adaptation to abiotic and biotic factors and (2) characterize major themes that influence the motivation...

Data from: Historical contingency in the evolution of antibiotic resistance after decades of relaxed selection

Kyle J. Card, Thomas LaBar, Jasper B. Gomez & Richard E. Lenski
Populations often encounter changed environments that remove selection for the maintenance of particular phenotypic traits. The resulting genetic decay of those traits under relaxed selection reduces an organism’s fitness in its prior environment. However, whether and how such decay alters the subsequent evolvability of a population upon restoration of selection for a previously diminished trait is not well understood. We addressed this question using Escherichia coli strains from the long-term evolution experiment (LTEE) that independently...

Illumination of cell cycle progression by multi-fluorescent sensing system

Shuo Liu, Jun Li, Teng Wang, Jiawen Xu, Zhipei Liu, Haobin Wang, Gong-Hong Wei, Alessandro Ianni, Thomas Braun & Shijing Yue
Multi-fluorescent imaging of cell cycle progression is essential for the study of cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. However, there remain challenges, particularly to image cell cycle progression in living cell with available imaging techniques due to lacking the suitable probe. Here, we design a triple fluorescent sensors system making the cell cycle progression visible. Multi-fluorescent sensor shows the proliferating or proliferated cells with different colors. We thus generate the construct and adenovirus to...

Illumination of cell cycle progression by multi-fluorescent sensing system

Shuo Liu, Jun Li, Teng Wang, Jiawen Xu, Zhipei Liu, Haobin Wang, Gong-Hong Wei, Alessandro Ianni, Thomas Braun & Shijing Yue
Multi-fluorescent imaging of cell cycle progression is essential for the study of cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. However, there remain challenges, particularly to image cell cycle progression in living cell with available imaging techniques due to lacking the suitable probe. Here, we design a triple fluorescent sensors system making the cell cycle progression visible. Multi-fluorescent sensor shows the proliferating or proliferated cells with different colors. We thus generate the construct and adenovirus to...

Data from: Strength of species interactions determines biodiversity and stability in microbial communities

Christoph Ratzke, Julien Barrere & Jeff Gore
Organisms, especially microbes, tend to live in complex communities. While some of these ecosystems are very bio-diverse, others aren′t, and while some are very stable over time others undergo strong temporal fluctuations. Despite a long history of research and a plethora of data it is not fully understood what sets biodiversity and stability of ecosystems. Theory as well as experiments suggest a connection between species interaction, biodiversity, and stability of ecosystems, where an increase of...

Coping with impostor feelings: evidence-based recommendations from a mixed methods study

Jill Barr-Walker, Debra A. Werner, Liz Kellermeyer & Michelle B. Bass
The negative effects of impostor phenomenon, also called impostor syndrome, include burnout and decreased job satisfaction and have led to an increased interest in addressing this issue in libraries in recent years. While previous research has shown that many librarians experience impostor phenomenon, the experience of coping with these feelings has not been widely studied. Our study’s aim was to understand how health sciences librarians cope with impostor phenomenon in the workplace, using a quantitative...

The Church, intensive kinship, and global psychological variation

Jonathan Schulz, Duman Bahrami Rad, Jonathan Beauchamp & Joseph Henrich
Recent research not only confirms the existence of substantial psychological variation around the globe but also highlights the peculiarity of many Western populations. We propose that part of this 15 variation can be traced back to the action and diffusion of the Western Church, the branch of Christianity that evolved into the Roman Catholic Church. Specifically, we propose that the Church’s transformation of European kinship, by promoting small, nuclear households, weak family ties and residential...

Stepwise shifts underlie evolutionary trends in morphological complexity of the mammalian vertebral column

Katrina Jones
A fundamental concept in evolutionary biology is that life tends to become more complex through geologic time, but empirical examples of this phenomenon are controversial. One debate is whether increasing complexity is the result of random variations, or if there are evolutionary processes which actively drive its acquisition, and if these processes act uniformly across clades. The mammalian vertebral column provides an opportunity to test these hypotheses because it is composed of serially-repeating vertebrae for...

Data from: Population genomics and demographic sampling of the ant-plant Vachellia drepanolobium and its symbiotic ants from sites across its range in East Africa.

John H. Boyle, Dino Martins, Paul M. Musili & Naomi E. Pierce
The association between the African ant plant, Vachellia drepanolobium, and the ants that inhabit it has provided insight into the boundaries between mutualism and parasitism, the response of symbioses to environmental perturbations, and the ecology of species coexistence. We use a landscape genomics approach at sites sampled throughout the range of this system in Kenya to investigate the demographics and genetic structure of the different partners in the association. We find that different species of...

Data from: Biological traits, phylogeny and human footprint signatures on the geographic range size of passerines (Order Passeriformes) worldwide

Miguel Ángel Olalla-Tárraga, Talita Amado, Luis Mauricio Bini, Pablo Martínez, Ignacio Morales-Castilla, Erik Joaquin Torres-Romero & Fabricio Villalobos
Aim Multiple hypotheses exist to explain the astonishing geographic range size variation across species, but these have rarely been tested under a unifying framework that simultaneously considers direct and indirect effects of ecological niche processes and evolutionary dynamics. Here, we jointly evaluate ecological and evolutionary hypotheses that may account for global interspecific patterns of range size in the most species-rich avian order: Passeriformes (perching birds). Location Global Time period CurrentMajor taxa studied Order Passeriformes Methods...

Data from: Heterochronic shifts and conserved embryonic shape underlie crocodylian craniofacial disparity and convergence

Zachary S. Morris, Kent A. Vliet, Arkhat Abzhanov & Stephanie E. Pierce
The distinctive anatomy of the crocodylian skull is intimately linked with dietary ecology, resulting in repeated convergence on blunt- and slender-snouted ecomorphs. These evolutionary shifts depend upon modifications of the developmental processes which direct growth and morphogenesis. Here we examine the evolution of cranial ontogenetic trajectories to shed light on the mechanisms underlying convergent snout evolution. We use geometric morphometrics to quantify skeletogenesis in an evolutionary context and reconstruct ancestral patterns of ontogenetic allometry to...

Transitions in paternal social status predict patterns of offspring growth and metabolic transcription

Joseph W. Cauceglia, Adam C. Nelson, Nimrod D. Rubinstein, Shweta Kukreja, Lynsey N. Sasso, John A. Beaufort, Oliver J. Rando & Wayne K. Potts
Parental effects occur when changes in the parental phenotype or environment cause changes to offspring phenotype. While some parental effects are triggered in response to an environmental cue in a time-locked fashion, other parental effects persist even after the cue has been removed, suggesting multiple timescales of action. For parental effects to serve as reliable signals of current environmental conditions, they should be reversible, such that when the cue changes, offspring phenotypes change in accordance....

Registration Year

  • 2019
    41

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    41

Affiliations

  • Harvard University
    41
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    3
  • West China Hospital of Sichuan University
    2
  • Zhejiang University
    2
  • Dalian Polytechnic University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • Southwest Medical University
    2
  • Utah State University
    2
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • Royal Ontario Museum
    2