88 Works

Data from: Measuring the success of reforestation for restoring biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

Mia A. Derhé, Helen Murphy, Geoff Monteith & Rosa Menéndez
Effective assessment of the success of ecological restoration projects is critical in justifying the use of restoration in natural resource management as well as improving best practice. One of the main goals of ecological restoration is the recovery of ecosystem function, yet most researchers assume that increasing species and or functional diversity equates with restoration of ecosystem function, rather than empirically demonstrating these mechanistic relationships. In this study, we assess how dung beetle species diversity,...

Data from: Patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation in resistance gene clusters of two hybridizing European Populus species

Celine Caseys, Kai N. Stölting, Thelma Barbara, Santiago C. Gonzalez-Martinez & Christian Lexer
Resistance genes (R-genes) are essential for long-lived organisms such as forest trees, which are exposed to diverse herbivores and pathogens. In short-lived model species, R-genes have been shown to be involved in species isolation. Here, we studied more than 400 trees from two natural hybrid zones of the European Populus species Populus alba and Populus tremula for microsatellite markers located in three R-gene clusters, including one cluster situated in the incipient sex chromosome region. The...

Data from: Capturing neutral and adaptive genetic diversity for conservation in a highly structured tree species

Isabel Rodríguez-Quilón, Luis Santos-Del-Blanco, María Jesús Serra-Varela, Jarkko Koskela, Santiago César González-Martínez & Ricardo Alía
Preserving intraspecific genetic diversity is essential for long-term forest sustainability in a climate change scenario. Despite that, genetic information is largely neglected in conservation planning, and how conservation units should be defined is still heatedly debated. Here, we use maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), an outcrossing long lived tree with a highly fragmented distribution in the Mediterranean biodiversity hotspot, to prove the importance of accounting for genetic variation - at both neutral molecular markers and...

UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) bird data: 1995-2012

S. Rennie, J. Adamson, R. Anderson, C. Andrews, J. Bater, N. Bayfield, K. Beaton, D. Beaumont, S. Benham, V. Bowmaker, C. Britt, R. Brooker, D. Brooks, A. Brunt, J. Brunt, G. Common, R. Cooper, S. Corbett, N. Critchley, P. Dennis, J. Dick, B. Dodd, N. Dodd, N. Donovan, J. Easter … & M. Whittaker
Bird species data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. Counts of individual bird species are recorded. These data are collected, using the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO)'s Breeding Bird Survey methodology, at all of ECN's terrestrial sites using a standard protocol. They represent continuous records from 1995 to 2012 (the transects are walked twice each year). ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a...

Data from: Species interactions increase the temporal stability of community productivity in Pinus sylvestris-Fagus sylvatica mixtures across Europe

Miren Del Río, Hans Pretzsch, Ricardo Ruiz-Peinado, Evy Ampoorter, Peter Annighöfer, Ignacio Barbeito, Kamil Bielak, Gediminas Brazaitis, Lluis Coll, Lars össler, Marek Fabrika, David I. Forrester, Michael Heym, Václav Hurt, Viktor Kurylyak, Magnus Löf, Fabio Lombardi, Ekaterina Makrickiene, Bratislav Matovic, Frits Mohren, Renzo Motta, Jan Den Ouden, Maciej Pach, Quentin Ponette, Gerhard Schütze … & Lars Drössler
1.There is increasing evidence that species diversity enhances the temporal stability of community productivity in different ecosystems, although its effect at population and tree levels seems to be negative or neutral. Asynchrony in species responses to environmental conditions was found to be one of the main drivers of this stabilizing process. However, the effect of species mixing on the stability of productivity, and the relative importance of the associated mechanisms, remain poorly understood in forest...

Data from: Positive biodiversity-productivity relationships in forests: climate matters

Herve Jactel, Emmanuel S. Gritti, Lars Drössler, David I. Forrester, William L. Mason, Xavier Morin, Hans Pretzsch & Bastien Castagneyrol
While it is widely acknowledged that forest biodiversity contributes to climate change mitigation through improved carbon sequestration, conversely how climate affects tree species diversity - forest productivity relationships is still poorly understood. We combined the results of long-term experiments where forest mixtures and corresponding monocultures were compared on the same site to estimate the yield of mixed-species stands at a global scale, and its response to climatic factors. We found positive mixture effects on productivity...

UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) stream water discharge data: 1993-2015

S. Rennie, J. Adamson, R. Anderson, C. Andrews, J. Bater, N. Bayfield, K. Beaton, D. Beaumont, S. Benham, V. Bowmaker, C. Britt, R. Brooker, D. Brooks, J. Brunt, G. Common, R. Cooper, S. Corbett, N. Critchley, P. Dennis, J. Dick, B. Dodd, N. Dodd, N. Donovan, J. Easter, M. Flexen … & C. Wood
Stream water discharge data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. The data (stage and discharge) are collected by loggers at ECN's terrestrial sites (where a stream is present) using a standard protocol. They represent continuous 15-minute records from 1993 to 2015. The sites at which these data are collected are: Glensaugh, Moor House - Upper Teesdale, Sourhope, Wytham and Y Wyddfa (Snowdon). ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is...

UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) soil solution chemistry data: 1992-2015

S. Rennie, J. Adamson, R. Anderson, C. Andrews, J. Bater, N. Bayfield, K. Beaton, D. Beaumont, S. Benham, V. Bowmaker, C. Britt, R. Brooker, D. Brooks, J. Brunt, G. Common, R. Cooper, S. Corbett, N. Critchley, P. Dennis, J. Dick, B. Dodd, N. Dodd, N. Donovan, J. Easter, M. Flexen … & C. Wood
Soil solution data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. Variables measured include pH, conductivity, alkalinity, aluminium, calcium, chloride, ammonium, nitrate nitrogen, phosphate phosphorous, potassium, sulphate sulphur, sodium, total nitrogen and total dissolved phosphorous. These data are collected by suction samplers at all of ECN's terrestrial sites using a standard protocol. They represent continuous fortnightly records from 1992 to 2015. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme...

Data from: Environment and host as large-scale controls of ectomycorrhizal fungi

Sietse Van Der Linde, Laura M. Suz, C. David L. Orme, Filipa Cox, Henning Andreae, Endla Asi, Bonnie Atkinson, Sue Benham, Christopher Carroll, Nathalie Cools, Bruno De Vos, Hans-Peter Dietrich, Johannes Eichhorn, Joachim Germann, Tine Grebenc, Hyun S. Gweon, Karin Hansen, Frank Jacob, Ferdinand Kristöfel, Pawel Lech, Miklos Manninger, Jan Martin, Henning Meesenburg, Päivi Merilä, Manuel Nicolas … & Martin I. Bidartondo
Explaining the large-scale diversity of soil organisms that drive biogeochemical processes—and their responses to environmental change—is critical. However, identifying consistent drivers of belowground diversity and abundance for some soil organisms at large spatial scales remains problematic. Here we investigate a major guild, the ectomycorrhizal fungi, across European forests at a spatial scale and resolution that is—to our knowledge—unprecedented, to explore key biotic and abiotic predictors of ectomycorrhizal diversity and to identify dominant responses and thresholds...

UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) stream water chemistry data: 1992-2015

S. Rennie, J. Adamson, R. Anderson, C. Andrews, J. Bater, N. Bayfield, K. Beaton, D. Beaumont, S. Benham, V. Bowmaker, C. Britt, R. Brooker, D. Brooks, J. Brunt, G. Common, R. Cooper, S. Corbett, N. Critchley, P. Dennis, J. Dick, B. Dodd, N. Dodd, N. Donovan, J. Easter, M. Flexen … & C. Wood
Stream water chemistry data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. Variables measured include pH, conductivity, alkalinity, aluminium, calcium, chloride, ammonium, nitrate nitrogen, phosphate phosphorous, potassium, sulphate sulphur, sodium, total nitrogen and total dissolved phosphorous. The data are collected by dip samples at ECN's terrestrial sites (where there is a stream present) using a standard protocol. They represent continuous weekly records from 1992 to 2015. The sites at which these data are collected...

Tree trait, insect herbivore abundance and powdery mildew infection data (2016-17) from Forest Research Climate Matching Trials, UK

E Field, K Schonrogge, N Barsoum, A Hector & M Gibbs
This data set comprises two years of data (2016 and 2017) from one trial (Hucking, Kent, UK) and one year (2017) from a second trial (Hartshorne, Derbyshire, UK). Data was collected on tree traits (tree height, shoot length, tree provenance), abundance of foliar insect herbivores (gallers, leaf manipulators and leaf miners) and leaf damage by oak powdery mildew, a foliar fungal pathogen. Data was collected from plots differing in tree diversity (provenance and species diversity).

Associational resistance to both insect and pathogen damage in mixed forests is modulated by tree neighbour identity and drought

Elsa Field, Bastien Castagneyrol, Melanie Gibbs, Hervé Jactel, Nadia Barsoum, Karsten Schonrogge & Andrew Hector
Tree health declines can be caused by interactions between pests and pathogens and many studies have shown a reduction in their damage in mixed species forests compared to monocultures. Yet few authors have considered tree diversity effects on both groups simultaneously. Moreover, it is unclear whether diversity effects on tree pests and pathogens are robust to changes in abiotic conditions, such as drought. We addressed tree diversity effects on foliar insect herbivory, oak powdery mildew...

Small scale variability in soil moisture drives infection of vulnerable juniper populations by invasive forest pathogen

Flora Donald, Sarah Green, Kate Searle, Nik J. Cunniffe & Bethan V. Purse
The oomycete plant pathogen, Phytophthora austrocedri, is an aggressive killer of cypress trees causing severe mortality of Chilean cedar (Austrocedrus chilensis) in Argentina since the 1940s and now common juniper (Juniperus communis s.l.) in the UK. Rapid mortality of key UK juniper populations was first observed in the early 2000s; the causal agent of mortality was confirmed as P. austrocedri in 2012 and the pathogen has now been widely detected - but is not ubiquitous...

Larval mass and survival data for Maniola jurtina under drought stress, UK

M.P. Greenwell, M.S. Botham, M.W. Bruford, J.C. Day, L.C. Evans, M. Gibbs, I. Middlebrook, D.B. Roy, K. Watts & T.H. Oliver
Larval mass and survival data for Meadow Brown butterflies (Maniola jurtina) originating from nine different source populations in the UK and reared under one of two host plant treatment groups (either control or drought stress) in an outdoor insectary at UKCEH under natural environmental conditions. Each individual larva was monitored at three growth check points throughout development: 49 days after hatching (pre-overwintering), 162 days after hatching (post overwintering during larval growth) and 309 days after...

Data from: In situ genetic association for serotiny, a fire-related trait, in Mediterranean maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton)

Katharina B. Budde, Myriam Heuertz, Ana Hernández-Serrano, Juli G. Pausas, Giovanni G. Vendramin, Miguel Verdú & Santiago C. González-Martínez
Wildfire is a major ecological driver of plant evolution. Understanding the genetic basis of plant adaptation to wildfire is crucial, because impending climate change will involve fire regime changes worldwide. We studied the molecular genetic basis of serotiny, a fire-related trait, in Mediterranean maritime pine using association genetics. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) set was used to identify genotype : phenotype associations in situ in an unstructured natural population of maritime pine (eastern Iberian Peninsula)...

Data from: Can facilitation influence the spatial genetics of the beneficiary plant population?

Maria Clara Castellanos, Santiago Donat-Caerols, Santiago C. González-Martínez & Miguel Verdú
Plant facilitation is a positive interaction where a nurse or nurse plant community alters the local conditions, improving the life-time fitness of other beneficiary plants. In stressful environments, a common consequence is the formation of discrete vegetation patches under nurse plants, surrounded by open space. The consequences of such spatial patterns have been studied mostly at the community level. At the population level, facilitation causes a distribution of beneficiary individuals that could have intra-specific genetic...

Data from: Climatic drivers of leaf traits and genetic divergence in the tree Annona crassiflora: a broad spatial survey in the Brazilian savannas

Priciane C. Ribeiro, Matheus L. Souza, Larissa A. C. Muller, Vincenzo A. Ellis, Myriam Heuertz, José P. Lemos-Filho & Maria Bernadete Lovato
The Cerrado is the largest South American savanna and encompasses substantial species diversity and environmental variation. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the influence of the environment on population divergence of Cerrado species. Here, we searched for climatic drivers of genetic (nuclear microsatellites) and leaf trait divergence in Annona crassiflora, a widespread tree in the Cerrado. The sampling encompassed all phytogeographic provinces of the continuous area of the Cerrado and included 397 individuals belonging to 21...

Data from: Congruent phylogeographic patterns of eight tree species in Atlantic Central Africa provide insights on the past dynamics of forest cover

Gilles Dauby, Jérôme Duminil, Myriam Heuertz, K. Guillaume Koffi, Tariq Stévart & Olivier J. Hardy
Cycles of Quaternary climate change are assumed to be major drivers of African rainforest dynamics and evolution. However, most hypotheses on past vegetation dynamics relied on palaeobotanical records, an approach lacking spatial resolution, and on current patterns of species diversity and endemism, an approach confounding history and environmental determinism. In this context, a comparative phylogeographic study of rainforest species represents a complementary approach because Pleistocene climate fluctuations may have left interpretable signatures in the patterns...

UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) rabbit and deer data: 1993-2012

S. Rennie, J. Adamson, R. Anderson, C. Andrews, J. Bater, N. Bayfield, K. Beaton, D. Beaumont, S. Benham, V. Bowmaker, C. Britt, R. Brooker, D. Brooks, J. Brunt, G. Common, R. Cooper, S. Corbett, N. Critchley, P. Dennis, J. Dick, B. Dodd, N. Dodd, N. Donovan, J. Easter, E. Eaton … & M. Whittaker
Rabbit and deer data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. These data are collected by transect at ECN's terrestrial sites using a standard protocol. The protocol uses an index method based on dropping counts (of deer, rabbits - and where appropriate sheep and Grouse) to estimate relative abundance. They represent twice-yearly continuous records from 1993 to 2012. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme sponsored by...

Data from: Causes and consequences of large clonal assemblies in a poplar hybrid zone

David Macaya-Sanz, Myriam Heuertz, Dorothea Lindtke, Giovanni G. Vendramin, Christian Lexer & Santiago C. Gonzalez-Martinez
Asexual reproduction is a common and fundamental mode of reproduction in plants. Although persistence in adverse conditions underlies most known cases of clonal dominance, proximal genetic drivers remain unclear, in particular for populations dominated by a few large clones. In this study, we studied a clonal population of the riparian tree Populus alba in the Douro river basin (northwestern Iberian Peninsula) where it hybridizes with Populus tremula, a species that grows in highly contrasted ecological...

UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) moth data: 1992-2015

S. Rennie, J. Adamson, R. Anderson, C. Andrews, J. Bater, N. Bayfield, K. Beaton, D. Beaumont, S. Benham, V. Bowmaker, C. Britt, R. Brooker, D. Brooks, J. Brunt, G. Common, R. Cooper, S. Corbett, N. Critchley, P. Dennis, J. Dick, B. Dodd, N. Dodd, N. Donovan, J. Easter, M. Flexen … & C. Wood
Moth data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. Counts of individual species are recorded. These data are collected by moth traps at all of ECN's terrestrial sites using a standard protocol.They represent continuous nightly records from 1992 to 2015. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a consortium of fourteen government departments and agencies. These organisations contribute to the programme through funding either site...

Data from: Interannual variations in needle and sapwood traits of Pinus edulis branches under an experimental drought

Marceau Guerin, Dario Martin-Benito, Georg Von Arx, Laia Andreu Hayles, Kevin L. Griffin, Rayann Hamdan, Nate G. McDowell, Robert Muscarella, Will Pockman, Pierre Gentine, William Pockman & Laia Andreu-Hayles
1) In the Southwest United States, recent large-scale die-offs of conifers raise the question of their resilience and mortality under droughts. To date, little is known about the interannual structural response to droughts. 2) We hypothesized that piñon pines (Pinus edulis) respond to drought by reducing the drop of leaf water potential in branches from year to year through needle morphological adjustments. We tested our hypothesis using a seven-year experiment in central New Mexico with...

Data from: Severity of impacts of an introduced species corresponds with regional eco-evolutionary experience

Kimberley T. Davis, Ragan M. Callaway, Alex Fajardo, Anibal Pauchard, Martin A Nunez, Rob W Brooker, Bruce D. Maxwell, Romina D Dimarco, Duane A Peltzer, Bill Mason, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Anne C S McIntosh, Robin J Pakeman, Alyssa Laney Smith & Michael Gundale
Invasive plant impacts vary widely across introduced ranges. We tested the hypothesis that differences in the eco-evolutionary experience of native communities with the invader correspond with the impacts of invasive species on native vegetation, with impacts increasing with ecological novelty. We compared plant species richness and composition beneath Pinus contorta to that in adjacent vegetation and other P. contorta stands across a network of sites in its native (Canada and USA) and non-native (Argentina, Chile,...

Data from: Context-dependent colonisation of terrestrial habitat 'islands' by a long-distance migrant bird

Robin C. Whytock, Elisa Fuentes-Montemayor, Kevin Watts, Nicholas A. Macgregor, Lefora Williams & Kirsty J. Park
Landscape context can affect how individuals perceive patch quality during colonisation. However, although context-dependent colonisation has been observed in aquatic environments it has rarely been studied in terrestrial environments or at large spatial scales. Here, we assessed how landscape context influenced colonisation rates in a large-scale (c.7000 km2) terrestrial system where colonisers (Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus) are capable of rapid, long-distance movements. Bioacoustic recorders were used to detect first song dates (an indicator of colonisation...

UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) atmospheric nitrogen chemistry data: 1993-2015

S. Rennie, J. Adamson, R. Anderson, C. Andrews, J. Bater, N. Bayfield, K. Beaton, D. Beaumont, S. Benham, V. Bowmaker, C. Britt, R. Brooker, D. Brooks, J. Brunt, G. Common, R. Cooper, S. Corbett, N. Critchley, P. Dennis, J. Dick, B. Dodd, N. Dodd, N. Donovan, J. Easter, M. Flexen … & C. Wood
Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide data from the UK Environmental Change Network (ECN) terrestrial sites. These data (weight of NO2) are collected by diffusion tubes at all of ECN's terrestrial sites using a standard protocol. They represent continuous fortnightly records from 1993 to 2015. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. It is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a consortium of fourteen government departments and agencies. These organisations contribute to the programme through funding either site...

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