41 Works

Data from: Comparing traditional and Bayesian approaches to ecological meta-analysis

Paula Pappalardo, Kiona Ogle, Elizabeth Hamman, James Bence, Bruce Hungate & Craig Osenberg
1. Despite the wide application of meta-analysis in ecology, some of the traditional methods used for meta-analysis may not perform well given the type of data characteristic of ecological meta-analyses. 2. We reviewed published meta-analyses on the ecological impacts of global climate change, evaluating the number of replicates used in the primary studies (ni) and the number of studies or records (k) that were aggregated to calculate a mean effect size. We used the results...

Anuran limbs reflect microhabitat and distal, later-developing bones are more evolutionarily labile

Natasha Stepanova & Molly C. Womack
Tetrapod limbs have been used as a model system to investigate how selective pressures and constraints shape morphological evolution. Anurans have had many independent transitions to various microhabitats, allowing us to dissect how these factors influence limb morphology. Furthermore, anurans provide a unique system to test the generality of developmental constraints proposed in mammals, namely that later-developing limb bones are under less constraint and show more variation. We used micro-computed tomography scans of 236 species...

Data from: Visualizing mineralization processes and fossil anatomy using synchronous synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction mapping

Pierre Gueriau, Solenn Réguer, Nicolas Leclercq, Camila Cupello, Paulo M. Brito, Clément Jauvion, Séverin Morel, Sylvain Charbonnier, Dominique Thiaudière & Cristian Mocuta
Fossils, including those that occasionally preserve decay-prone soft-tissues, are mostly made of minerals. Accessing their chemical composition provides unique insight into their past biology and/or the mechanisms by which they preserve, leading to a series of developments in chemical and elemental imaging. However, the mineral composition of fossils, particularly where soft-tissues are preserved, is often only inferred indirectly from elemental data, while X-ray diffraction that specifically provides phase identification received little attention. Here, we show...

Data from: One panel to rule them all: DArTcap genotyping for population structure, historical demography, and kinship analyses, and its application to a threatened shark

Pierre Feutry, Floriaan Devloo-Delva, Adrien Tran Lu Y, Stefano Mona, Rasanthi Gunasekera, Grant Johnson, Richard Pillans, Damian Jaccoud, Andrzej Kilian, David Morgan, Thor Saunders, Nicholas Bax & Peter Kyne
With recent advances in sequencing technology, genomic data are changing how important conservation management decisions are made. Applications such as Close-Kin Mark-Recapture demand large amounts of data to estimate population size and structure, and their full potential can only be realised through ongoing improvements in genotyping strategies. Here we introduce DArTcap, a cost-efficient method that combines DArTseq and sequence capture, and illustrate its use in a high resolution population analysis of Glyphis garricki, a rare,...

Contribution of genetic versus plastic responses to adaptive patterns in a widespread butterfly along a latitudinal cline

Franziska Günter, Michaël Beaulieu, Kasimir F. Freiberg, Ines Welzel, Nia Toshkova, Žagar, Tatjana Simčič & Klaus Fischer
Understanding how organisms adapt to complex environments is a central goal of evolutionary biology and ecology. This issue is of special interest in the current era of rapidly changing climatic conditions. Here, we investigate clinal variation and plastic responses in life history, morphology, and physiology in the butterfly Pieris napi along a pan-European gradient by exposing butterflies raised in captivity to different temperatures. We found clinal variation in body size, growth rates and concomitant development...

Host identity and symbiotic association affects the genetic and taxonomic diversity of the clownfish-hosting sea anemone microbiome

Benjamin Titus, Robert Laroche, Estafania Rodriguez, Herman Wirshing & Christopher Meyer
All eukaryotic life engages in symbioses with a diverse community of bacteria that are essential for performing basic life functions. In many cases, eukaryotic organisms form additional symbioses with other macroscopic eukaryotes. The tightly-linked physical interactions that characterize many macroscopic symbioses creates opportunities for microbial transfer, which likely affects the diversity and function of individual microbiomes, and may ultimately lead to microbiome convergence between distantly related taxa. Here, we sequence the microbiomes of five species...

Beyond the landscape: resistance modelling infers physical and behavioural gene flow barriers to a mobile carnivore across a metropolitan area

Sophia Kimmig, Joscha Beninde, Myriam Brandt, Anna Schleimer, Stephanie Kramer-Schadt, Heribert Hofer, Konstantin Börner, Christoph Schulze, Ulrich Wittstatt, Mike Heddergott, Tania Halczok, Christoph Staubach & Alain Frantz
Urbanization affects key aspects of wildlife ecology. Dispersal in urban wildlife species may be impacted by geographical barriers but also by a species’ inherent behavioural variability. There are no functional connectivity analyses using continuous individual-based sampling across an urban-rural continuum that would allow a thorough assessment of the relative importance of physical and behavioural dispersal barriers. We used 16 microsatellite loci to genotype 374 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from the city of Berlin and surrounding...

Biogeographic barriers, Pleistocene refugia, and climatic gradients in the southeastern Nearctic drive diversification in corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus complex)

Edward Myers, Alexander McKelvy & Frank Burbrink
The southeastern Nearctic is a biodiversity hotspot that is also rich in cryptic species. This richness can be explained by numerous hypotheses affecting divergence, which include biogeographic barriers, adaptation to climatic gradients across this region, and Pleistocene speciation in glacial refugia. However, previous phylogeographic studies have both supported and refuted these hypotheses. Therefore, while one or more of these hypotheses may explain diversification, it is likely that taxa are forming within this region in species-specific...

Data from: A new small, mesorostrine inioid (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Delphinida) from four late Miocene localities of the Pisco Basin, Peru

Olivier Lambert, Alberto Collareta, Aldo Benites-Palomino, Claudio Di Celma, Christian De Muizon, Mario Urbina & Giovanni Bianucci
The moderately rich past diversity of the superfamily Inioidea (Cetacea, Odontoceti) in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans contrasts with the present survival of a single genus (Inia, Amazon river dolphin, family Iniidae) in freshwater deposits of South America and of a single species (Pontoporia blainvillei, Franciscana, family Pontoporiidae) along the eastern coast of that continent. However, part of the late Miocene to Pliocene inioid fossil record is made of relatively fragmentarily known species, for...

Eye size and investment in frogs and toads correlate with adult habitat, activity pattern and breeding ecology

Kate N. Thomas, David J. Gower, Rayna C. Bell, Matthew K. Fujita, Ryan K. Schott & Jeffrey W. Streicher
Frogs and toads (Amphibia: Anura) display diverse ecologies and behaviours, which are often correlated with visual capacity in other vertebrates. Additionally, anurans exhibit a broad range of relative eye sizes, which have not previously been linked to ecological factors in this group. We measured relative investment in eye size and corneal size for 220 species of anurans representing all 55 currently recognized families and tested whether they were correlated with six natural history traits hypothesized...

Tracking the Near East origins and European dispersal of the house mouse

Thomas CUCCHI, Katerina Papayianni, Sophie Cersoy, Laetitia Aznar-Cormano, Antoine Zazzo, Régis Debruyne, Rémi Berthon, Adrian Bălășescu, Alan Simmons, François Valla, Yannis Hamilakis, Fanis Mavridis, Marjan Mashkour, Jamshid Darvish, Roohollah Siahsarvi, Fereidoun Biglari, Cameron A. Petrie, Lloyd Weeks, Alireza Sardari, Sepideh Maziar, Christiane Denys, David Orton, Emma Jenkins, Melinda Zeder, Jeremy B. Searle … & Jean-Denis Vigne
The house mouse (Mus musculus) is one of the most invasive mammals and an evolutionary model. However, the timing and components of its origin and dispersal remain poorly documented. To track its synanthropisation and subsequent biological invasion during the develoment of complex human societies, we analyzed 829 Mus specimens from 43 archaeological contexts in Southwestern Asia and Southeastern Europe, dating between 40,000 and 3,000 cal. BP, combining geometric morphometris numerical taxonomy with ancient mitochondrial DNA...

Regional assemblages shaped by historical and contemporary factors: evidence from a species-rich insect group

Mengdi Hao, Qian Jin, Guanliang Meng, Caiqing Yang, Shenzhou Yang, Zhiyong Shi, Min Tang, Shanlin Liu, Yinan Li, Dan Zhang, Xu Su, Chungkun Shih, Yiran Sun, Xin Zhou & Ai-Bing Zhang
Understanding the complex diversity patterns is one of the main aims of community ecology. It is important to take both historical and contemporary factors into account in investigating the potential roles in assembling diversity patterns. Here, We compared diversity patterns of two moth assemblages sampled from Taihang and Yanshan mountains in Northern China and performed ancestral range reconstructions using the Multi-State-Speciation and Extinction model to track the origins of these patterns. We subsequently estimate diversification...

The only complete articulated early Miocene chameleon skull (Rusinga Island, Kenya) suggests an African origin for Madagascar’s endemic chameleons

Andrej Cernansky, Anthony Herrel, Job Kibii, Christopher Anderson, Renaud Boistel & Thomas Lehmann
We here present the first detailed study of the specimen KNM-RU 18340 from Rusinga Island (Kenya), the only known complete early Miocene chameleon skull, using micro-CT. This specimen represents one of the oldest chameleon fossils ever recovered. For the first time, the skull bone internal surfaces, their sutures, and elements contained inside the rocky matrix are observed. Our morphological comparisons and phylogenetic analyses place this specimen confidently in the genus Calumma and a new species,...

Trait-dependency of trophic interactions in zooplankton food webs

Florian Vincent, Andrea Bertolo, Gérard Lacroix, Maud Mouchet & Eric Edeline
Anthropogenic change in the abundance or identity of dominant top predators may induce reorganizations in whole food webs. Predicting these reorganizations requires identifying the biological rules that govern trophic niches. However, we still lack a detailed understanding of the respective contributions of body size, behaviour (e.g., match between predator hunting mode and prey antipredator strategy), phylogeny and/or ontogeny in determining both the presence and strength of trophic interactions. Here, we address this question by measuring...

Hybridization and transgressive exploration of colour pattern and wing morphology in Heliconius butterflies

Claire Mérot, Vincent Debat, Yann Le Poul, Richard M Merrill, Russell E Naisbit, Adélie Tholance, Chris Jiggins & Mathieu Joron
Hybridization can generate novel phenotypes distinct from those of parental lineages, a phenomenon known as transgressive trait variation. Transgressive phenotypes might negatively or positively affect hybrid fitness, and increase available variation. Closely related species of Heliconius butterflies regularly produce hybrids in nature and hybridization is thought to play a role in the diversification of novel wing colour patterns despite strong stabilizing selection due to interspecific mimicry. Here, we studied wing phenotypes in first and second...

Phenotypic divergence in two sibling species of shorebird: Common Snipe and Wilson's Snipe (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae)

Tiago M Rodrigues, Edward Miller, Sergei V Drovetski, Robert M Zink, Jon Fjeldså & David Gonçalves
Natural selection and social selection are among the main shapers of biological diversity, but their relative importance in divergence remains understudied. Additionally, although neutral evolutionary processes may promote phenotypic divergence, their potential contribution in speciation is often overlooked in studies of comparative morphology. In this study, we investigated phenotypic differentiation in two allopatric shorebirds: the Palearctic Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago and the Nearctic Wilson’s Snipe G. delicata. Specimens of Common Snipe (n = 355 skins,...

The mark of captivity: plastic responses in the ankle bone of a wild ungulate (Sus scrofa)

Thomas CUCCHI, Hugo Harbers, Dimitri Neaux, Katia Ortiz, Flavie Laurens, Isabelle Baly, Cécile Callou, Renate Schafberg, Ashleigh Haruda, François Lecompte, Jacqueline Studer, Sabrina Renaud, Yann Locatelli, Jean-Denis Vigne & Anthony Herrel
Deciphering the plastic (non-heritable) changes induced by human control over wild animals in the archaeological record is challenging. We hypothesized that changes in locomotor behaviour in a wild ungulate due to mobility control could be quantified in the bone anatomy. To test this, we experimented the effect of mobility reduction on the skeleton of wild boar (Sus scrofa), using the calcaneus shape as a possible phenotypic marker. We first assessed differences in shape variation and...

Resolving spatial complexities of hybridization in the context of the gray zone of speciation in North American ratsnakes (Pantherophis obsoletus complex)

Frank Burbrink, Marcelo Gehara, Alexander McKelvy & Edward Myers
Inferring the history of divergence between species in a framework that permits the presence of gene flow has been crucial for characterizing the “gray zone” of speciation, which is the period of time where lineages have diverged but have not yet achieved strict reproductive isolation. However, estimates of both divergence times and rates of gene flow often ignore spatial information, for example when considering the location and width of hybrid zones with respect to changes...

Global Diversification Dynamics Since the Jurassic: Low Dispersal and Habitat-Dependent Evolution Explain Hotspots of Diversity and Shell Disparity in River Snails (Viviparidae)

Björn Stelbrink, Romy Richter, Frank Köhler, Frank Riedel, Ellen Strong, Bert Van Bocxlaer, Christian Albrecht, Torsten Hauffe, Timothy Page, David Aldridge, Arthur Bogan, Li-Na Du, Marivene Manuel-Santos, Ristiyanti Marwoto, Alena Shirokaya & Thomas Von Rintelen
The Viviparidae, commonly known as River Snails, is a dominant group of freshwater snails with a nearly worldwide distribution that reaches its highest taxonomic and morphological diversity in Southeast Asia. The rich fossil record is indicative of a probable Middle Jurassic origin on the Laurasian supercontinent where the group started to diversify during the Cretaceous. However, it remains uncertain when and how the biodiversity hotspot in Southeast Asia was formed. Here, we used a comprehensive...

Data from: Recent biological invasion shapes species recognition and aggressive behavior in a native species: a behavioral experiment using robots in the field

Claire Dufour, David Clark, Jonathan Losos & Anthony Herrel
Invasive species are a worldwide threat to biodiversity. Yet, our understanding of biological invasions remains incomplete, partly due to the difficulty of tracking and studying behavioral interactions in recently created species interactions. We tested whether the interactions between the recently introduced invasive lizard Anolis cristatellus and the native Anolis oculatus in Dominica have led to changes in species recognition and aggressive behavior of the native species. The use of realistic robots allowed us to test...

A new target capture phylogeny elucidates the systematics and evolution of wing coupling in sack‐bearer moths

Ryan St Laurent, Carlos G. C. Mielke, Daniel Herbin, Kelly M. Dexter & Akito Y. Kawahara
The frenulum is a wing coupling structure that is found on the wings of most families of Lepidoptera. It is a single bristle or set of bristles that originate from the base of the hindwing that often interlocks with the forewing during flight. This wing coupling mechanism is thought to have been a major evolutionary innovation that allowed for enhanced flight in Lepidoptera. The sack-bearer moths (Mimallonidae) are unusual among Lepidoptera in that not all...

Data from: A mobile laboratory for ancient DNA analysis

Jose Utge, Jean-Marc Elalouf, Noémi Sévêque, Anne-Sophie Lartigot-Campin, Agnès Testu, Anne-Marie Moigne, Régis Vézian, Frédéric Maksud, Robert Begouën, Sylvain Soriano & Chistine Verna
Mobile devices for on-field DNA analysis have been used for medical diagnostics at the point-of-care, forensic investigation and environmental survey, but still have to be validated for ancient DNA studies. We report here on a mobile laboratory that we setup using commercially available devices, including a compact real-time PCR machine, and describe procedures to perform DNA extraction and analysis from a variety of archeological samples within 4 hours. The process is carried out on 50...

Data from: Shells of the bivalve Astarte moerchi give new evidence of a strong pelagic-benthic coupling shift occurring since the late 1970s in the NOW Polynya

Frederic Olivier, Blandine Gaillard, Julien Thébault, Tarik Meziane, Réjean Tremblay, Dany Dumont, Simon Bélanger, Michel Gosselin, Aurélie Jolivet, Laurent Chauvaud, André L. Martel, Søren Rysgaard, Anne-Hélène Olivier, Julien Pettré, Jérôme Mars, Silvain Gerber & Philippe Archambault
Climate changes in the Arctic may weaken the currently tight pelagic-benthic coupling. In response to decreasing sea ice cover, arctic marine systems are expected to shift from a ‘sea-ice algae-benthos’ to a ‘phytoplankton-zooplankton’ dominance. We used mollusk shells as bioarchives and fatty acid trophic markers to estimate the effects of the reduction of sea ice cover on the exported food to the seafloor. Bathyal bivalve Astarte moerchi that lives at 600 m depth in northern...

Shifts in sexual dimorphism across a mass extinction in ostracods: implications for sexual selection as a factor in extinction risk

Gene Hunt
Sexual selection often favors investment in expensive sexual traits that help individuals compete for mates. In a rapidly changing environment, however, allocation of resources to traits related to reproduction at the expense of those related to survival may elevate extinction risk. Empirical testing of this hypothesis in the fossil record, where extinction can be directly documented, is largely lacking. The rich fossil record of cytheroid ostracods offers a unique study system in this context: the...

Towards a taxonomically unbiased EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030

Stefano Mammola, Nicoletta Riccardi, Vincent Prié, Ricardo Correia, Pedro Cardoso, Manuel Lopes-Lima & Ronaldo Sousa
Through the Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and the LIFE projects financial investments, Europe has been the world’s experimental arena for biological conservation. With an estimated budget of €20 billion/year, the EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030 has set an ambitious goal of reaching 30% Protected Areas and ensure no deterioration in conservation trends and status of all protected species. We analyzed LIFE projects focused on animals from 1992 to 2018 and we found that investment towards vertebrates...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    41

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    41

Affiliations

  • National Museum of Natural History
    41
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • American Museum of Natural History
    3
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • University of Greifswald
    2
  • BGI-Japan
    2
  • Smithsonian Institution
    2
  • Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • University of Camerino
    1