9 Works

Data from: Geographic differences in vertical connectivity in the Caribbean coral Montastraea cavernosa despite high levels of horizontal connectivity at shallow depths

Xaymara Serrano, Iliana B. Baums, Katherine O'Reilly, Tyler B. Smith, Ross J. Jones, Tonya L. Shearer, Flavia L. D. Nunes & Andrew C. Baker
The Deep Reef Refugia Hypothesis proposes that deep reefs can act as local recruitment sources for shallow reefs following disturbance. To test this hypothesis, nine polymorphic DNA microsatellite loci were developed and used to assess vertical connectivity in 583 coral colonies of the Caribbean depth-generalist coral Montastraea cavernosa. Samples were collected from three depth zones (≤10 m, 15-20 m and ≥25 m) at sites in Florida Upper Keys, Lower Keys and Dry Tortugas), Bermuda, and...

Data from: Molecular genetics to inform spatial management in benthic invertebrate fisheries: a case study using the Australian greenlip abalone

Karen J. Miller, Craig N. Mundy & Stephen Mayfield
Hierarchical sampling and subsequent microsatellite genotyping of >2,300 Haliotis laevigata (greenlip abalone) from 19 locations distributed across five biogeographic regions has substantially advanced our knowledge of population structure and connectivity in this commercially-important species. The study has found key differences in stock structure of H. laevigata compared with the sympatric and con-generic Haliotis rubra (blacklip abalone) and yielded valuable insights into the management of fisheries targeting species characterised by spatial structure at small scales (i.e....

Data from: Sediment and turbidity associated with offshore dredging increase coral disease prevalence on nearby reefs

F. Joseph Pollock, Joleah B. Lamb, Stuart N. Field, Scott F. Heron, Britta Schaffelke, George Shedrawi, David G. Bourne & Bette L. Willis
In recent decades, coral reef ecosystems have declined to the extent that reefs are now threatened globally. While many water quality parameters have been proposed to contribute to reef declines, little evidence exists conclusively linking specific water quality parameters with increased disease prevalence in situ. Here we report evidence from in situ coral health surveys confirming that chronic exposure to dredging-associated sediment plumes significantly increase the prevalence of white syndromes, a devastating group of globally...

Data from: Genetic structure of populations of whale sharks among ocean basins and evidence for their historic rise and recent decline

Thomas M. Vignaud, Jeffrey A. Maynard, Raphael Leblois, Mark G. Meekan, Ricardo Vázquez-Juárez, Dení Ramírez-Macías, Simon J. Pierce, David Rowat, Michael L. Berumen, Champak Beeravolu, Sandra Baksay & Serge Planes
This study presents genetic evidence that whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, are comprised of at least two populations that rarely mix and is the first to document a population expansion. Relatively high genetic structure is found when comparing sharks from the Gulf of Mexico with sharks from the Indo-Pacific. If mixing occurs between the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, it is not sufficient to counter genetic drift. This suggests whale sharks are not all part of a...

Data from: Immune response genes and pathogen presence predict migration survival in wild salmon smolts

Ken M. Jeffries, Scott G. Hinch, Marika Kirsten Gale, Timothy D. Clark, Andrew G. Lotto, Matthew T. Casselman, Shaorong Li, Erin L. Rechisky, Aswea D. Porter, David W. Welch, Kristina M. Miller & Marika Kirstin Gale
We present the first data to link physiological responses and pathogen presence with subsequent fate during migration of wild salmonid smolts. We tagged and non-lethally sampled gill tissue from sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) smolts as they left their nursery lake (Chilko Lake, BC, Canada) to compare gene expression profiles and freshwater pathogen loads with migration success over the first ~1150 km of their migration to the North Pacific Ocean using acoustic telemetry. Fifteen percent of...

Data from: Exploring Symbiodinium diversity and host specificity in Acropora corals from geographical extremes of Western Australia with 454 amplicon pyrosequencing

Luke Thomas, Gary A. Kendrick, W. Jason Kennington, Zoe T. Richards & Michael Stat
Scleractinian corals have demonstrated the ability to shuffle their endosymbiotic dinoflagellate communities (genus Symbiodinium) during periods of acute environmental stress. This has been proposed as a mechanism of acclimation, which would be increased by a diverse and flexible association with Symbiodinium. Conventional molecular techniques used to evaluate Symbiodinium diversity lack the sensitivity to capture accurate estimates of diversity and are unable to identify genetic lineages present at background levels below 10%. Next generation sequencing (NGS)...

Data from: Does genetic distance between parental species influence outcomes of hybridisation among coral reef butterflyfishes?

Stefano R. Montanari, Jean-Paul A. Hobbs, Morgan S. Pratchett, Line K. Bay & Lynne Van Herwerden
Christmas Island is located at the overlap of the Indian and Pacific Ocean marine provinces and is a hot spot for marine hybridization. Here, we evaluate the ecological framework and genetic consequences of hybridization between butterflyfishes Chaetodon guttatissimus and Chaetodon punctatofasciatus. Further, we compare our current findings to those from a previous study of hybridization between Chaetodon trifasciatus and Chaetodon lunulatus. For both species groups, habitat and dietary overlap between parental species facilitate frequent heterospecific...

Data from: Aerobic scope predicts dominance during early life in a tropical damselfish

Shaun S. Killen, Matthew D. Mitchell, Jodie L. Rummer, Douglas P. Chivers, Maud C. O. Ferrari, Mark I. McCormick & Mark G. Meekan
A range of physiological traits are linked with aggression and dominance within social hierarchies, but the role of individual aerobic capacity in facilitating aggression has seldom been studied. Further, links previously observed between an individual's metabolic rate and aggression level may be context dependent and modulated by factors such as social stress and competitor familiarity. We examined these issues in juvenile Ambon damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, which display intraspecific competition for territories during settlement on coral...

Data from: Larval settlement: the role of surface topography for sessile coral reef invertebrates

Steve Whalan, Muhammad A. Abdul Wahab, Susanne Sprungala, Andrew J. Poole & Rocky De Nys
For sessile marine invertebrates with complex life cycles, habitat choice is directed by the larval phase. Defining which habitat-linked cues are implicated in sessile invertebrate larval settlement has largely concentrated on chemical cues which are thought to signal optimal habitat. There has been less effort establishing physical settlement cues, including the role of surface microtopography. This laboratory based study tested whether surface microtopography alone (without chemical cues) plays an important contributing role in the settlement...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    9
  • James Cook University
    4
  • University of Western Australia
    2
  • Southern Cross University
    1
  • Marine Megafauna Foundation
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • University of Saskatchewan
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
    1
  • University of Geneva
    1