591 Works

Data from: Social evolution of toxic metal bioremediation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Siobhán O'Brien, David J. Hodgson & Angus Buckling
Bacteria are often iron-limited, and hence produce extracellular iron-scavenging siderophores. A crucial feature of siderophore production is that it can be an altruistic behaviour (individually costly but benefitting neighbouring cells), thus siderophore producers can be invaded by non-producing social ‘cheats’. Recent studies have shown that siderophores can also bind other heavy metals (such as Cu and Zn), but in this case siderophore chelation actually reduces metal uptake by bacteria. These complexes reduce heavy metal toxicity,...

Data from: Flexible mate choice when mates are rare and time is short

Robin M. Tinghitella, Emily G. Weigel, Megan Head & Janette W. Boughman
Female mate choice is much more dynamic than we once thought. Mating decisions depend on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, and these two may interact with one another. In this study, we investigate how responses to the social mating environment (extrinsic) change as individuals age (intrinsic). We first conducted a field survey to examine the extent of natural variation in mate availability in a population of threespine sticklebacks. We then manipulated the sex ratio in...

Data from: Extra-group mating increases inbreeding risk in a cooperatively breeding bird

Xavier A. Harrison, Jennifer E. York, Dominic L. Cram & Andrew J. Young
In many cooperatively-breeding species females mate extra-group, the adaptive value of which remains poorly understood. One hypothesis posits that females employ extra-group mating to access mates whose genotypes are more dissimilar to their own than their social mates’, so as to increase offspring heterozygosity. We test this hypothesis using life-history and genetic data from 36 cooperatively-breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali) groups. Contrary to prediction, a dominant female’s relatedness to her social mate did not...

Southern Ocean procellariform blood and feather stable isotope data

T.W. Bodey, E.J. Ward, R.A. Phillips, R.A.R. McGill & S. Bearhop
This dataset comprises the delta-13C and delta-15N stable isotopic information from two tissue samples (whole blood and mantle feathers) from 16 adults of 8 species of Southern Ocean procellariform collected at Bird Island, South Georgia during the austral summer 2001-2002. There have been numerous long-term research projects carried out at Bird Island under the auspices of the British Antarctic Survey, and this data represents one very small component that has been used to examine inter-specific...

Data from: The evolution of bacterial mutation rates under simultaneous selection by inter-specific and social parasitism

Siobhán O'Brien, Antonio M. M. Rodrigues & A. Buckling
Many bacterial populations harbour substantial numbers of hypermutable bacteria, in spite of hypermutation being associated with deleterious mutations. One reason for the persistence of hypermutators is the provision of novel mutations, enabling rapid adaptation to continually changing environments, for example coevolving virulent parasites. However, hypermutation also increases the rate at which intraspecific parasites (social cheats) are generated. Interspecific and intraspecific parasitism are therefore likely to impose conflicting selection pressure on mutation rate. Here, we combine...

Data from: Sequential mate choice and sexual isolation in threespine stickleback species

Genevieve M. Kozak, Megan L. Head, Alycia C. R. Lackey & Janette W. Boughman
Sequential mate choice strategies predict how females should alter their choosiness based on the availability of attractive males. While there are many studies on sequential mate choice within species, few have asked if females apply these strategies to interactions between species and how these strategies may affect hybridization. We tested how previous interactions with conspecific and heterospecific males affect mate preference and sexual isolation in two threespine stickleback species (benthics and limnetics: Gasterosteus spp.). Consistent...

Data from: Important impacts of tissue selection and lipid extraction on ecological parameters derived from stable isotope ratios

Matthew J. Perkins, Robbie A. McDonald, F. J. Frank Van Veen, Simon D. Kelly, Gareth Rees & Stuart Bearhop
1. The nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios of animal tissues can help identify the composition of diets and open up a myriad of ecological applications. However, consumers do not ingest or assimilate all components of food items, and it is not well understood how sampling different tissues of sources and consumers may affect isotopic values ascribed, and thereby how such variation affects derived ecological measures. 2. Utilising a simple prey–predator feeding relationship in...

Data from: Diet complexity in early life affects survival in released pheasants by altering foraging efficiency, food choice, handling skills and gut morphology

Mark A. Whiteside, Rufus Sage & Joah R. Madden
1. Behavioural and physiological deficiencies are major reasons why reintroduction programmes suffer from high mortality when captive animals are used. Mitigation of these deficiencies is essential for successful reintroduction programmes. 2. Our study manipulated early developmental diet to better replicate foraging behaviour in the wild. Over 2 years, we hand-reared 1800 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), from 1 day old, for 7 weeks under different dietary conditions. In year one, 900 pheasants were divided into three groups...

Data from: Anthropogenic and ecological drivers of amphibian disease (Ranavirosis)

Alexandra C. North, David J. Hodgson, Stephen J. Price & Amber G. F. Griffiths
Ranaviruses are causing mass amphibian die-offs in North America, Europe and Asia, and have been implicated in the decline of common frog (Rana temporaria) populations in the UK. Despite this, we have very little understanding of the environmental drivers of disease occurrence and prevalence. Using a long term (1992-2000) dataset of public reports of amphibian mortalities, we assess a set of potential predictors of the occurrence and prevalence of Ranavirus-consistent common frog mortality events in...

Data from: Assembly mechanisms determining high species turnover in aquatic communities over regional and continental scales

Duarte S. Viana, Jordi Figuerola, Klaus Schwenk, Marina Manca, Anders Hobæk, Marit Mjelde, Christopher D. Preston, Richard J. Gornall, Jane M. Croft, Robert A. King, Andy J. Green & Luis Santamaría
Niche and neutral processes drive community assembly and metacommunity dynamics, but their relative importance might vary with the spatial scale. The contribution of niche processes is generally expected to increase with increasing spatial extent at a higher rate than that of neutral processes. However, the extent to what community composition is limited by dispersal (usually considered a neutral process) over increasing spatial scales might depend on the dispersal capacity of composing species. To investigate the...

Methane fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada

M.A. Cooper, C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset contains methane fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Methane fluxes were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus and thawing features of peatland plateaus.

Soil dates using 210Pb in profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soils dated using 210Pb in profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil cores were sampled during early summer in 2013 and 2014 from peatland plateaus, thawing peatland plateaus, burnt and unburnt black spruce forests in Yukon and Northwest Territories. The upper part of the soil profile was dated using 210Pb to quantify recent carbon accumulation rates.

Data from: Impacts of regular and random noise on the behaviour, growth and development of larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

Sophie L. Nedelec, Stephen D. Simpson, Erica L. Morley, Brendan Nedelec & Andrew N. Radford
Anthropogenic noise impacts behaviour and physiology in many species, but responses could change with repeat exposures. As repeat exposures can vary in regularity, identifying regimes with less impact is important for regulation. We use a 16-day split-brood experiment to compare effects of regular and random acoustic noise (playbacks of recordings of ships), relative to ambient-noise controls, on behaviour, growth and development of larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Short-term noise caused startle responses in newly hatched...

Data from: Sexual selection and population divergence I: the influence of socially flexible cuticular hydrocarbon expression in male field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus)

Sonia Pascoal, Magdalena Mendrok, Christopher Mitchell, Alastair J. Wilson, John Hunt & Nathan W. Bailey
Debates about how coevolution of sexual traits and preferences might promote evolutionary diversification have permeated speciation research for over a century. Recent work demonstrates that the expression of such traits can be sensitive to variation in the social environment. Here we examined social flexibility in a sexually selected male trait – cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles – in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus and tested whether population genetic divergence predicts the extent or direction of social...

Data from: The price of associating with breeders in the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler: foraging constraints, survival and sociality

Enrico Sorato, Simon C. Griffith & Andy F. Russell
Understanding the costs of living with breeders might offer new insights into the factors that counter evolutionary transitions from selfish individuals to cooperative societies. While selection on early dispersal is well-understood, it is less clear whether costs are also associated with remaining with family members during subsequent breeding; a pre-requisite to the evolution of kin-based cooperation. We propose and test the hypothesis that living in groups containing breeders is costly and that such costs are...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) meteorological data from Cartmel Sands, Morecambe

T.C. Hill & M. Chocholek
The meteorological data describes the air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction and the vapour pressure deficit. Data collection was carried out at Cartmel Sands marsh from the 31st of May 2013 till the 26th of January 2015. The Cartmel Sands site is in Morecambe, North West England, and the meteorological tower was situated in the middle of the marsh. This data was collected as part of...

Data from: Assessing bundles of ecosystem services from regional to landscape scale: insights from the French Alps

Emilie Crouzat, Maud Mouchet, Francis Turkelboom, Coline Byczek, Jeroen Meersmans, Frederic Berger, Pieter Johannes Verkerk & Sandra Lavorel
1. Assessments of ecosystem services (ES) and biodiversity (hereafter ecological parameters) provide a comprehensive view of the links between landscapes, ecosystem functioning and human well-being. The investigation of consistent associations between ecological parameters, called bundles, and of their links to landscape composition and structure is essential to inform management and policy, yet it is still in its infancy. 2. We mapped over the French Alps an unprecedented array of 18 ecological parameters (16 ES and...

Data from: Phenotype-environment matching in sand fleas

Martin Stevens, Annette C. Broderick, Brendan J. Godley, Alice E. Lown, Jolyon Troscianko, Nicola Weber & Sam B. Weber
Camouflage is perhaps the most widespread anti-predator strategy in nature, found in numerous animal groups. A long-standing prediction is that individuals should have camouflage tuned to the visual backgrounds where they live. However, while several studies have demonstrated phenotype–environment associations, few have directly shown that this confers an improvement in camouflage, particularly with respect to predator vision. Here, we show that an intertidal crustacean, the sand flea (Hippa testudinaria), has coloration tuned to the different...

Data from: Genome-wide transcriptional signatures of migratory flight activity in a globally invasive insect pest

Christopher M. Jones, Alexie Papanicolaou, George K. Mironidis, John Vontas, Yihua Yang, Ka S. Lim, Kumar S. Singh, John G. Oakeshott, Christopher Bass, Jason W. Chapman & Chris Bass
Migration is a key life history strategy for many animals and requires a suite of behavioural, morphological and physiological adaptations which together form the ‘migratory syndrome’. Genetic variation has been demonstrated for many traits that make up this syndrome, but the underlying genes involved remain elusive. Recent studies investigating migration-associated genes have focussed on sampling migratory and nonmigratory populations from different geographic locations but have seldom explored phenotypic variation in a migratory trait. Here, we...

Data from: Local adaptation is associated with zinc tolerance in Pseudomonas endophytes of the metal-hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens

Helen N. Fones, Hannah McCurrach, Aziz Mithani, J. Andrew C. Smith & Gail M. Preston
Metal hyperaccumulating plants, which are hypothesised to use metals for defence against pests and pathogens, provide a unique context in which to study plant–pathogen co-evolution. Previously, we demonstrated that the high concentrations of zinc found in leaves of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens provide protection against bacterial pathogens, with a potential trade-off between metal-based and pathogen-induced defences. We speculated that an evolutionary arms race between zinc-based defences in N. caerulescens and zinc tolerance in pathogens might...

Data from: Protein and carbohydrate intake influence sperm number and male fertility in male cockroaches but not sperm viability

Harriet Bunning, James Rapkin, Catharine Ruth Archer, Kim Jensen, John Hunt & Laurence Belcher
It is commonly assumed that because males produce many, tiny sperm, they are cheap to produce. Recent work, however, suggests that sperm production is not cost-free. If sperm are costly to produce, sperm number and/or viability should be influenced by diet, and this has been documented in numerous species. Yet few studies have examined the exact nutrients responsible for mediating these effects. Here, we quantify the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on...

Data from: Limited plasticity in the phenotypic variance-covariance matrix for male advertisement calls in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus

William R. Pitchers, Robert Brooks, Michael D. Jennions, Tom Tregenza, Ian Dworkin & John Hunt
Phenotypic integration and plasticity are central to our understanding of how complex phenotypic traits evolve. Evolutionary change in complex quantitative traits can be predicted using the multivariate breeders’ equation, but such predictions are only accurate if the matrices involved are stable over evolutionary time. Recent study, however, suggests that these matrices are temporally plastic, spatially variable and themselves evolvable. The data available on phenotypic variance-covariance matrix (P) stability are sparse, and largely focused on morphological...

Data from: Genotype-by-environment interactions for cuticular hydrocarbon expression in Drosophila simulans

Fiona C. Ingleby, David J. Hosken, Kristy Flowers, Michael F. Hawkes, Sarah M. Lane, James Rapkin, Ian Dworkin & John Hunt
Genotype-by-environment interactions (G x Es) describe genetic variation for phenotypic plasticity. Recent interest in the role of these interactions in sexual selection has identified G x Es across a diverse range of species and sexual traits. Additionally, theoretical work predicts that G x Es in sexual traits could help to maintain genetic variation, but could also disrupt the reliability of these traits as signals of mate quality. However, empirical tests of these theoretical predictions are...

Data from: Interactive effects of inbreeding and endocrine disruption on reproduction in a model laboratory fish

Lisa K. Bickley, Andrew R. Brown, David J. Hosken, Patrick B. Hamilton, Gareth Le Page, Gregory C. Paull, Stewart F. Owen & Charles R. Tyler
Inbreeding depression is expected to be more severe in stressful environments. However, the extent to which inbreeding affects the vulnerability of populations to environmental stressors, such as chemical exposure, remains unresolved. Here we report on the combined impacts of inbreeding and exposure to an endocrine disrupting chemical (the fungicide, clotrimazole) on zebrafish (Danio rerio). We show that whilst inbreeding can negatively affect reproductive traits, not all traits are affected equally. Inbreeding depression frequently only became...

Data from: Stress hormone receptors change as range expansion progresses in house sparrows

Andrea L. Liebl & Lynn B. Martin
As ranges expand, individuals encounter different environments at the periphery than at the centre of the range. Previously, we have shown that glucocorticoids (GCs) vary with range expansion: individuals at the range edge release more GCs in response to restraint. Here, we measured hippocampal mRNA expression of GC receptors (mineralocorticoid, MR and glucocorticoid, GR) in eight house sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations varying in age. We found that individuals closest to the range edge had the...

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