58 Works

Data from: Do female Nicrophorus vespilloides reduce direct costs by choosing males that mate less frequently?

Paul E. Hopwood, Geoffrey P. F. Mazué, Mauricio J. Carter, Megan L. Head, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Sexual conflict occurs when selection to maximize fitness in one sex does so at the expense of the other sex. In the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, repeated mating provides assurance of paternity at a direct cost to female reproductive productivity. To reduce this cost, females could choose males with low repeated mating rates or smaller, servile males. We tested this by offering females a dichotomous choice between males from lines selected for high or low...

Data from: Insecticide resistance mediated by an exon skipping event

Madeleine Berger, Alin Mirel Puinean, Emma Randall, Christoph T. Zimmer, Wellington M. Silva, Pablo Bielza, Linda M. Field, David Hughes, Ian Mellor, Keywan Hassani-Pak, Herbert A. A. Siqueira, Martin S. Williamson & Chris Bass
Many genes increase coding capacity by alternate exon usage. The gene encoding the insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α6 subunit, target of the bio-insecticide spinosad, is one example of this and expands protein diversity via alternative splicing of mutually exclusive exons. Here, we show that spinosad resistance in the tomato leaf miner, Tuta absoluta is associated with aberrant regulation of splicing of Taα6 resulting in a novel form of insecticide resistance mediated by exon skipping....

Data from: The evolution of cooperation by negotiation in a noisy world

Koichi Ito, John M. McNamara, Atsushi Yamauchi & Andrew D. Higginson
Cooperative interactions among individuals are ubiquitous despite the possibility of exploitation by selfish free-riders. One mechanism that may promote cooperation is “negotiation”: individuals altering their behaviour in response to the behaviour of others. Negotiating individuals decide their actions through a recursive process of reciprocal observation, thereby reducing the possibility of free-riding. Evolutionary games with response rules have shown that infinitely many forms of the rule can be evolutionarily stable simultaneously, unless there is variation in...

Data from: A trade-off between reproductive investment and maternal cerebellum size in a precocial bird

Christina Ebneter, Joel L. Pick & Barbara Tschirren
Natural selection favours increased investment in reproduction, yet considerable variation in parental investment is observed in natural populations. Life-history theory predicts that this variation is maintained by a trade-off between the benefits of increased reproductive investment and its associated costs for the parents. The nature of these costs of reproduction, however, remains poorly understood. The brain is an energetically highly expensive organ and increased reproductive investment may, therefore, negatively affect brain maintenance. Using artificial selection...

Data from: Constrained evolution of the sex comb in Drosophila simulans

Manar S. Maraqa, Robert Griffin, Manmohan D. Sharma, Alastair J. Wilson, John Hunt, David J. Hosken & Clarissa M. House
Male fitness is dependent on sexual traits that influence mate acquisition (pre-copulatory sexual selection) and paternity (post-copulatory sexual selection), and while many studies have documented the form of selection in one or the other of these arenas, fewer have done it for both. Nonetheless, it appears that the dominant form of sexual selection is directional, although theoretically, populations should converge on peaks in the fitness surface, where selection is stabilizing. Many factors, however, can prevent...

Data from: Host diversity limits the evolution of parasite local adaptation

Daniel Morley, Jenny M. Broniewski, Edze R. Westra, Angus Buckling & Stineke Van Houte
Specificity in the interactions between hosts and their parasites can lead to local adaptation. However, the degree of local adaptation is predicted to depend upon the diversity of resistance alleles within the host population; increasing host diversity should decrease mean parasite infectivity and hence reduce local adaptation. In this study, we empirically test this prediction using the highly specific interactions between bacteria with clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas) immunity and their bacteriophage. Bacteria...

Data from: Egg size investment in superb fairy-wrens: helper effects are modulated by climate

Naomi E. Langmore, Liam D. Bailey, Robert G. Heinsohn, Andrew F. Russell & Rebecca M. Kilner
Natural populations might exhibit resilience to changing climatic conditions if they already show adaptive flexibility in their reproductive strategies. In cooperative breeders, theory predicts that mothers with helpers should provide less care when environmental conditions are favourable, but maintain high investment when conditions are challenging. Here, we test for evidence of climate-mediated flexibility in maternal investment in the cooperatively breeding superb fairy-wren Malurus cyaneus. We focus on egg size because in this species egg size...

Data from: Interactive effects of yolk testosterone and carotenoid on prenatal growth and offspring physiology in a precocial bird

Mathieu Giraudeau, Ann-Kathrin Ziegler, Joel L. Pick, Simon Ducatez, Cindy I. Canale & Barbara Tschirren
Conditions experienced by individuals during prenatal development can have long-term effects on their phenotype. Maternally transmitted resources are important mediators of such prenatal effects, but the potential interactive effects among them in shaping offspring phenotype have never been studied. Maternally derived testosterone is known to stimulate growth, but these benefits may be counterbalanced by an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Maternally transmitted carotenoids might have the capacity to scavenge ROS and...

Data from: Immigration of susceptible hosts triggers the evolution of alternative parasite defence strategies

Hélène Chabas, Van Houte Stineke, Molin Hoyland-Kroghsbo Nina, Buckling Angus, Westra R. Edze, Nina Molin Høyland-Kroghsbo, Angus Buckling, Stineke Van Houte & Edze R. Westra
Migration of hosts and parasites can have a profound impact on host–parasite ecological and evolutionary interactions. Using the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 and its phage DMS3vir, we here show that immigration of naive hosts into coevolving populations of hosts and parasites can influence the mechanistic basis underlying host defence evolution. Specifically, we found that at high levels of bacterial immigration, bacteria switched from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) to surface modification-mediated defence. This...

Data from: Impact of controlled neonicotinoid exposure on bumblebees in a realistic field setting

Andres N. Arce, Thomas I. David, Emma L. Randall, Ana Ramos Rodrigues, Thomas J. Colgan, Yannick Wurm & Richard J. Gill
Pesticide exposure has been implicated as a contributor to insect pollinator declines. In social bees, which are crucial pollination service providers, the effect of low-level chronic exposure is typically non-lethal leading researchers to consider whether exposure induces sublethal effects on behaviour and whether such impairment can affect colony development. Studies under laboratory conditions can control levels of pesticide exposure and elucidate causative effects, but are often criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field studies can...

Data from: Selection on an antagonistic behavioral trait can drive rapid genital coevolution in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides

Paul Edward Hopwood, Megan L. Head, Eleanor J. Jordan, Mauricio J. Carter, Emma Davey, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Male and female genital morphology varies widely across many taxa, and even among populations. Disentangling potential sources of selection on genital morphology is problematic because each sex is predicted to respond to adaptations in the other due to reproductive conflicts of interest. To test how variation in this sexual conflict trait relates to variation in genital morphology we used our previously developed artificial selection lines for high and low repeated mating rates. We selected for...

Data from: Dietary carotenoid availability affects avian color discrimination

Hui Hui Lim & Thomas W. Pike
Carotenoid pigments are found in the retinas of many vertebrate species, where they serve a range of functions. In birds, carotenoid-containing retinal oil droplets act as optical filters, modifying the light reaching the underlying visual pigment and thereby enhancing color vision. Dietary carotenoid manipulation is known to affect the allocation of carotenoids to the retina, although the effects this has on vision are less well understood. Using dietary manipulations, in which juvenile Japanese quail (Coturnix...

Soil dates using radiocarbon in profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soil dates determined using radiocarbon in profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Depth-specific soil core samples were dated using radiocarbon. Soil cores were sampled during early summer in 2013 and 2014. Each year soil cores were sampled from a peatland plateau, thawing features of the peatland plateau, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites in Yukon and Northwest Territories.

Laboratory soil incubation respiration rates from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset contains measures of laboratory soil incubation respiration rates from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Samples from soil cores were incubated in the laboratory to quantify CO2 and CH4 gas production rates at two different temperatures under both anoxic and oxic incubations. Soil cores were sampled from a peatland plateau and a thawing feature of the peatland plateau and from a unburnt and a burnt black spruce forest, and also additional sites in Yukon.

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) eddy covariance flux data for Cartmel Sands, Morecambe

T.C. Hill & M. Chocholek
The eddy covariance flux data describes the fluxes of CO2, latent energy and sensible heat. It also includes ancillary data: air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction, vapour pressure deficit, friction velocity, Monin-Obukhov stability and modelled respiration. Data collection was carried out at Cartmel Sands marsh from the 31 May 2013 till the 26 January 2015. The Cartmel Sands site is in Morecambe, North West England, and...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) meteorological data from Abbotts Hall, Essex

T.C. Hill & M Chocholek
The meteorological data describes the air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction and the vapour pressure deficit. Data collection was carried out at Abbotts Hall marsh from the 15th of December 2012 till the 27th of January 2015. The Abbotts Hall site is in Essex, South East England, and the meteorological tower was situated in the middle of the marsh. This data was collected as part of...

Soil moisture profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soil moisture profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil mositure profiles were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites.

Data from: Comparative genomics to explore phylogenetic relationship, cryptic sexual potential and host specificity of Rhynchosporium species on grasses

Daniel Penselin, Martin Muensterkoetter, Susanne Kirsten, Marius Felder, Stefan Taudien, Matthias Platzer, Kevin Ashelford, Konrad H. Paskiewicz, Richard J. Harrison, David J. Hughes, Thomas Wolf, Ekaterina Shelest, Jenny Graap, Jan Hoffmann, Claudia Wenzel, Nadine Woeltje, Kevin M. King, Bruce D. L. Fitt, Ulrich Gueldener, Anna Avrova & Wolfgang Knogge
Background: The Rhynchosporium species complex consists of hemibiotrophic fungal pathogens specialized to different sweet grass species including the cereal crops barley and rye. A sexual stage has not been described, but several lines of evidence suggest the occurrence of sexual reproduction. Therefore, a comparative genomics approach was carried out to disclose the evolutionary relationship of the species and to identify genes demonstrating the potential for a sexual cycle. Furthermore, due to the evolutionary very young...

Data from: Age-related declines in immune response in a wild mammal are unrelated to immune cell telomere length

Christopher Beirne, Laura Waring, Robbie McDonald, Richard Delahay, Andrew Young & Robbie A. McDonald
Senescence has been hypothesised to arise in part from age-related declines in immune performance, but the patterns and drivers of within-individual age-related changes in immunity remain virtually unexplored in natural populations. Here, using a long-term epidemiological study of wild European badgers (Meles meles), we (i) present evidence of a within-individual age-related decline in the response of a key immune-signalling cytokine, Interferon-gamma (IFNγ), to ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation, and (ii) investigate three putative drivers of individual...

Data from: Adaptation to abiotic conditions drives local adaptation in bacteria and viruses coevolving in heterogeneous environments

Florien A. Gorter, Pauline D. Scanlan & Angus Buckling
Parasite local adaptation, the greater performance of parasites on their local compared with foreign hosts, has important consequences for the maintenance of diversity and epidemiology. While the abiotic environment may significantly affect local adaptation, most studies to date have failed either to incorporate the effects of the abiotic environment, or to separate them from those of the biotic environment. Here, we tease apart biotic and abiotic components of local adaptation using the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens...

Data from: Reproductive competition triggers mass eviction in cooperative banded mongooses

Faye J. Thompson, Harry H. Marshall, Jennifer J. Sanderson, Emma I. K. Vitikainen, Hazel J. Nichols, Jason S. Gilchrist, Andrew J. Young, Sarah J. Hodge & Michael A. Cant
In many vertebrate societies, forced eviction of group members is an important determinant of population structure, but little is known about what triggers eviction. Three main explanations are (1) the reproductive competition hypothesis; (2) the coercion of cooperation hypothesis; and (3) the adaptive forced dispersal hypothesis. The last hypothesis proposes that dominant individuals use eviction as an adaptive strategy to propagate copies of their alleles through a highly structured population. We tested these hypotheses as...

Soil thaw depth from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This datasets contains measures of soil thaw depth from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil thaw depth was measured in 2013 and 2014 in sites from Yukon and Northwest Territories.

Soil temperature profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soil temperature profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil temperature profiles were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, thawing features of peatland plateaus, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites.

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) eddy covariance flux data for Abbotts Hall, Essex

T. Hill & M. Chocholek
The eddy covariance data describes the fluxes of CO2, latent energy, and sensible heat. It also includes ancillary data: air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction, vapour pressure deficit, friction velocity, Monin-Obukhov stability and modelled respiration. Data collection was carried out at Abbotts Hall marsh from the 15 December 2012 till the 27 January 2015. The Abbotts Hall site is in Essex, South East England, and the...

Data from: Relative advantages of dichromatic and trichromatic color vision in camouflage breaking

Jolyon Troscianko, Jared Wilson-Aggarwal, David Griffiths, Claire N. Spottiswoode & Martin Stevens
There is huge diversity in visual systems and color discrimination abilities, thought to stem from an animal’s ecology and life history. Many primate species maintain a polymorphism in color vision, whereby most individuals are dichromats but some females are trichromats, implying that selection sometimes favors dichromatic vision. Detecting camouflaged prey is thought to be a task where dichromatic individuals could have an advantage. However, previous work either has not been able to disentangle camouflage detection...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    58

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    58

Affiliations

  • University of Exeter
    58
  • University of Edinburgh
    13
  • University of Sheffield
    11
  • University of Sussex
    10
  • University of St Andrews
    5
  • University of Glasgow
    3
  • Australian National University
    3
  • University of Zurich
    3
  • Rothamsted Research
    3
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    2