58 Works

Data from: Increased prenatal maternal investment reduces inbreeding depression in offspring

Kate E. Ihle, Pascale Hutter & Barbara Tschirren
Inbreeding depression refers to the reduction of fitness that results from matings between relatives. Evidence for reduced fitness in inbred individuals is widespread, but the strength of inbreeding depression varies widely both within and among taxa. Environmental conditions can mediate this variation in the strength of inbreeding depression, with environmental stress exacerbating the negative consequences of inbreeding. Parents can modify the environment experienced by offspring, and have thus the potential to mitigate the negative consequences...

Data from: Testing the stability of behavioural coping style across stress contexts in the Trinidadian guppy

Thomas M. Houslay, Maddalena Vierbuchen, Andrew J. Grimmer, Andrew J. Young & Alastair J. Wilson
Within populations, individuals can vary in stress response, a multivariate phenomenon comprising neuroendocrine, physiological and behavioural traits. Verbal models of individual stress “coping style” have proposed that the behavioural component of this variation can be described as a single axis, with each individual's coping style being consistent across time and stress contexts. Focusing on this behavioural component of stress response and combining repeated measures of multiple traits with a novel multivariate modelling framework, we test...

Data from: Phenotypic and genetic integration of personality and growth under competition in the sheepshead swordtail, Xiphophorus birchmanni

Kay Boulton, Craig A. Walling, Andrew J. Grimmer, Gil G. Rosenthal, Alastair Wilson & Alastair J. Wilson
Competition for resources including food, physical space, and potential mates is a fundamental ecological process shaping variation in individual phenotype and fitness. The evolution of competitive ability, in particular social dominance, depends on genetic (co)variation among traits causal (e.g., behavior) or consequent (e.g., growth) to competitive outcomes. If dominance is heritable, it will generate both direct and indirect genetic effects (IGE) on resource-dependent traits. The latter are expected to impose evolutionary constraint because winners necessarily...

Data from: Behavioural mediators of genetic life-history trade-offs: a test of the pace-of-life syndrome hypothesis in field crickets

Francesca Santostefano, Alastair J. Wilson, Petri T. Niemela & Niels J. Dingemanse
The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis predicts associations between life-history and ‘risky’ behaviours. Individuals with ‘fast’ lifestyles should develop faster, reproduce earlier, exhibit more risk-prone behaviour, and die sooner than those with ‘slow’ lifestyles. While support for POLS has been equivocal to date, studies have relied on individual-level (phenotypic) patterns in which genetic trade-offs may be masked by environmental effects on phenotypes. We estimated genetic correlations between life-history (development, lifespan, size) and risky behaviours (exploration, aggression)...

Data from: Spatial separation without territoriality in shark communities

Yannis P. Papastamatiou, Thomas W. Bodey, Alan M. Friedlander, Christopher G. Lowe, Darcy Bradley, Kevin Weng, Victoria Priestley & Jennifer E. Caselle
Spatial separation within predator communities can arise via territoriality but also from competitive interactions between and within species. However, linking competitive interactions to predator distribution patterns is difficult and theoretical models predict different habitat selection patterns dependent on habitat quality and how competition manifests itself. While models generally consider competitors to be either equal in ability, or for one phenotype to have a fixed advantage over the other, few studies consider that an animal may...

Data from: Mortality risk and social network position in resident killer whales: sex differences and the importance of resource abundance

Samuel Ellis, Daniel W. Franks, Stuart Nattrass, Michael A. Cant, M. N. Weiss, Deborah Giles, Kenneth C. Balcomb & Darren P. Croft
An individual’s ecological environment affects their mortality risk, which in turn has fundamental consequences for life history evolution. In many species social relationships are likely to be an important component of an individual’s environment, and therefore their mortality risk. Here we examine the relationship between social position and mortality risk in resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) using over three decades of social and demographic data. We find that the social position of male, but not...

Data from: Sexual selection and population divergence II. divergence in different sexual traits and signal modalities in field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus)

Sonia Pascoal, Magdalena Mendrok, Alastair J. Wilson, John Hunt & Nathan W. Bailey
Sexual selection can target many different types of traits. However, the relative influence of different sexually-selected traits during evolutionary divergence is poorly understood. We used the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus to quantify and compare how five traits from each of three sexual signal modalities and components diverge among allopatric populations: male advertisement song, cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles and forewing morphology. Population divergence was unexpectedly consistent: we estimated the among-population (genetic) variance-covariance matrix, D, for all...

Data from: Cognitive performance is linked to group size and affects fitness in Australian magpies

Benjamin J Ashton, Amanda R Ridley, Emily K Edwards & Alex Thornton
The Social Intelligence Hypothesis argues that the demands of social life drive cognitive evolution. This idea receives support from comparative studies linking variation in group size or mating systems with cognitive and neuroanatomical differences across species, but findings are contradictory and contentious. To understand the cognitive consequences of sociality it is also important to investigate social variation within species. Here we show that in wild, cooperatively breeding Australian magpies, individuals living in larger groups show...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    58

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    58

Affiliations

  • University of Exeter
    58
  • Western Sydney University
    4
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    3
  • University of Edinburgh
    3
  • Bangor University
    2
  • Plymouth University
    2
  • University of Pennsylvania
    2
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • University of Jaén
    2